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SuperKey and the OCLC MICROCON Service

SuperKey and the OCLC MICROCON Service SuperKey and th e OCLC MICROCON Service Mark Lager the means to speed data input for the ret­ St. John's Seminary rospective conversion and reclass projects. Camarillo, CA 93010 Since MICROCON uses nine of the ten function keys available on the old-style IBM keyboards for the program itself, staff When the Theology Library at St. John's members defined other keys on the key­ Seminary undertook to modernize and up­ board that aren't directly useful for the grade its functions, specific decisions to program: <F7 > replaced the two- reclass holdings to the Library of Congress keystroke # sign (SHIFT & 3 keys); the scheme and to convert all records to the <HOME> key was redefined as 050; the MARC format ensued. Once we began minus [or hyphen] key stored the subfield using the OCLC Online Union Catalog for b series needed in creating call numbers current cataloging, all incoming materials ($b. ). [SuperKey allows you to assign defi­ were classed into the Library of Congress nitions to any of the standard alphanu­ scheme, which created the problem of meric keys, as well as to combinations of subject materials being placed in more than keys, thus providing the potential for liter­ one area. (Previously, all functions were ally hundreds of macros.] Since the macros performed manually. Philosophical/reli­ can be changed at any time, we've also in­ gious items, that is, LC's B classes, were serted LC class letters in our definitions. classified into the specifically Catholic SuperKey is a RAM-resident program. Lynn-Peterson system.) Our decision to im­ Implementin g SuperKey That is, it resides in active memory, un­ plement retrospective conversion concur­ seen by the user, but it can be called at rently with the changeover, coupled with Stroke s any time. By the use of certain keystrokes, the fact that we have a small staff, meant The MICROCON input screen contains stored data can be either created, replayed, that we needed to find a way to complete seven areas for input: or changed. To use SuperKey effectively, it these projects efficiently. 1) the search key must be loaded before the MICROCON Since our reason for both reclassifica­ 2) the 035 field software. The MICROCON program is then tion and retrospective conversion was to 3) the 049 field loaded with its required data fields. (The enhance our participation in OCLC, we 4) the call number field MICROCON software allows us to use all decided to use the OCLC MICROCON off­ 5) Notes field the search keys we could use online, plus line conversion program as an inexpensive 6 and 7) 9xx fields for local information the date and format qualifiers. We nor­ conversion method. mally use the author/title, LCCN, ISBN, Certain elements in these fields are repeat- and OCLC control number keys.) able: the search key as well as the call At the first record where a field with Ou r Two-Step Process number fields hold recurring elements repeatable data is encountered, the staff (#, 050, 090, $b., etc.). We wanted to When retrieving records from the Online member calls forth the menus from Super- eliminate these duplicate keystrokes to en­ Union Catalog, the MICROCON program Key and creates a macro. The key is thus hance accuracy and efficiency. Also, since defaults to acceptance of 050 fields (re)defined and can be used throughout the our staff is small and we have a number of (Library of Congress call numbers), if avail­ session. Because these macros reside in ac­ parttime student workers, lack of daily, able on the OCLC master record. Since we tive memory, they're lost when the power consistent contact required retraining. We had previously used LC printed cards or is turned off. Saving the macros to disk wanted a means to create "function" keys CIP data, conversion and reclassification of prevents them from being lost and allows or macros so that users could (re)define a a majority of the collection was simple—all them to be recalled on startup. The rede­ certain key that would recreate these LC copy was accepted. fined macro keys are once again accessible, repetitive keystrokes. Then, when the de­ However, many records in the OCLC eliminating the need for typing. fined key was struck, the information Online Union Catalog have no 050; these Resetting the keys for use with other would be replayed. This capability also are original input records contributed by programs after using the MICROCON soft­ would eliminate the need for major participating member libraries. Since many ware is simple. A warm boot of the system retraining. of these records contain usable 090 call is all that's required. Unfortunately, the MICROCON pro­ numbers, we first processed records for We're now near completion of these gram provided no approach to assist with these materials using the MICROCON soft­ major projects. The .MICROCON software these repetitive data elements. So we pur­ ware. Then, records that we determined has saved us money by letting us enter chased Borland's SuperKey, a utility pro­ did not have an 050 were processed a sec­ data offline. SuperKey has saved us time gram that offers the ability to create and ond time, using the Cataloging Micro En­ by enabling us to create macros. They've store macros. [The 1985 version, 1.11A, hancer program to retrieve the records for been a real knockout combination. was reviewed in OCLC Micro, vol. 3, no . editing. To assist in verification, we en­ 3, p. 27.] With SuperKey working in con­ tered a local note that contained the origi­ junction with MICROCON, we now had nal Lynn-Peterson call number. OCLC Micro Vol. 5, No. 2 April 1989 2 1 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png OCLC Micro Emerald Publishing

SuperKey and the OCLC MICROCON Service

OCLC Micro , Volume 5 (2): 1 – Feb 1, 1989

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Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
8756-5196
DOI
10.1108/EUM0000000003568
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Abstract

SuperKey and th e OCLC MICROCON Service Mark Lager the means to speed data input for the ret­ St. John's Seminary rospective conversion and reclass projects. Camarillo, CA 93010 Since MICROCON uses nine of the ten function keys available on the old-style IBM keyboards for the program itself, staff When the Theology Library at St. John's members defined other keys on the key­ Seminary undertook to modernize and up­ board that aren't directly useful for the grade its functions, specific decisions to program: <F7 > replaced the two- reclass holdings to the Library of Congress keystroke # sign (SHIFT & 3 keys); the scheme and to convert all records to the <HOME> key was redefined as 050; the MARC format ensued. Once we began minus [or hyphen] key stored the subfield using the OCLC Online Union Catalog for b series needed in creating call numbers current cataloging, all incoming materials ($b. ). [SuperKey allows you to assign defi­ were classed into the Library of Congress nitions to any of the standard alphanu­ scheme, which created the problem of meric keys, as well as to combinations of subject materials being placed in more than keys, thus providing the potential for liter­ one area. (Previously, all functions were ally hundreds of macros.] Since the macros performed manually. Philosophical/reli­ can be changed at any time, we've also in­ gious items, that is, LC's B classes, were serted LC class letters in our definitions. classified into the specifically Catholic SuperKey is a RAM-resident program. Lynn-Peterson system.) Our decision to im­ Implementin g SuperKey That is, it resides in active memory, un­ plement retrospective conversion concur­ seen by the user, but it can be called at rently with the changeover, coupled with Stroke s any time. By the use of certain keystrokes, the fact that we have a small staff, meant The MICROCON input screen contains stored data can be either created, replayed, that we needed to find a way to complete seven areas for input: or changed. To use SuperKey effectively, it these projects efficiently. 1) the search key must be loaded before the MICROCON Since our reason for both reclassifica­ 2) the 035 field software. The MICROCON program is then tion and retrospective conversion was to 3) the 049 field loaded with its required data fields. (The enhance our participation in OCLC, we 4) the call number field MICROCON software allows us to use all decided to use the OCLC MICROCON off­ 5) Notes field the search keys we could use online, plus line conversion program as an inexpensive 6 and 7) 9xx fields for local information the date and format qualifiers. We nor­ conversion method. mally use the author/title, LCCN, ISBN, Certain elements in these fields are repeat- and OCLC control number keys.) able: the search key as well as the call At the first record where a field with Ou r Two-Step Process number fields hold recurring elements repeatable data is encountered, the staff (#, 050, 090, $b., etc.). We wanted to When retrieving records from the Online member calls forth the menus from Super- eliminate these duplicate keystrokes to en­ Union Catalog, the MICROCON program Key and creates a macro. The key is thus hance accuracy and efficiency. Also, since defaults to acceptance of 050 fields (re)defined and can be used throughout the our staff is small and we have a number of (Library of Congress call numbers), if avail­ session. Because these macros reside in ac­ parttime student workers, lack of daily, able on the OCLC master record. Since we tive memory, they're lost when the power consistent contact required retraining. We had previously used LC printed cards or is turned off. Saving the macros to disk wanted a means to create "function" keys CIP data, conversion and reclassification of prevents them from being lost and allows or macros so that users could (re)define a a majority of the collection was simple—all them to be recalled on startup. The rede­ certain key that would recreate these LC copy was accepted. fined macro keys are once again accessible, repetitive keystrokes. Then, when the de­ However, many records in the OCLC eliminating the need for typing. fined key was struck, the information Online Union Catalog have no 050; these Resetting the keys for use with other would be replayed. This capability also are original input records contributed by programs after using the MICROCON soft­ would eliminate the need for major participating member libraries. Since many ware is simple. A warm boot of the system retraining. of these records contain usable 090 call is all that's required. Unfortunately, the MICROCON pro­ numbers, we first processed records for We're now near completion of these gram provided no approach to assist with these materials using the MICROCON soft­ major projects. The .MICROCON software these repetitive data elements. So we pur­ ware. Then, records that we determined has saved us money by letting us enter chased Borland's SuperKey, a utility pro­ did not have an 050 were processed a sec­ data offline. SuperKey has saved us time gram that offers the ability to create and ond time, using the Cataloging Micro En­ by enabling us to create macros. They've store macros. [The 1985 version, 1.11A, hancer program to retrieve the records for been a real knockout combination. was reviewed in OCLC Micro, vol. 3, no . editing. To assist in verification, we en­ 3, p. 27.] With SuperKey working in con­ tered a local note that contained the origi­ junction with MICROCON, we now had nal Lynn-Peterson call number. OCLC Micro Vol. 5, No. 2 April 1989 2 1

Journal

OCLC MicroEmerald Publishing

Published: Feb 1, 1989

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