Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

Students achieving intercultural competence through group work: realised or idealised?

Students achieving intercultural competence through group work: realised or idealised? Purpose – The purpose of this study was to explore local and international business students' perceptions of their intercultural group work experience as a mechanism for developing intercultural competence and group work skills. Design/methodology/approach – Using qualitative interviews, the group work experiences of 11 final‐year undergraduate local and international students in a business program in a large Australian university were analysed. Findings – The findings suggest that international and local students working together on group assignments create social and academic situations that result in “at best” limited positive intercultural learning and relationships. Differences in expectations, motivations, language fluency, trust and relationship issues were evident when students collaborated on group assignments. Thus, it appears that group assignments are potentially flawed mechanisms for delivering the goals of intercultural competence and group work skills in business students. Practical implications – Although this exploratory study is limited in scope, the research has implications for pedagogical strategies, in particular, the use and design of group assignments and the preparation of students for working on group tasks in intercultural groups. It also has implications for developing effective learning mechanisms that lead to improved student intercultural competence, greater socio‐cultural engagement and the academic success of international and local business students, as well as positive learning experiences for all. Originality/value – The findings of this study are likely to be a useful resource for university staff considering the use of group work assignments for the development of intercultural understanding and competence and collaborative skills. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of International Education in Business Emerald Publishing

Students achieving intercultural competence through group work: realised or idealised?

Journal of International Education in Business , Volume 7 (1): 17 – Apr 29, 2014

Loading next page...
 
/lp/emerald-publishing/students-achieving-intercultural-competence-through-group-work-5bEPOQ8LiS
Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2014 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
2046-469X
DOI
10.1108/JIEB-05-2013-0017
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this study was to explore local and international business students' perceptions of their intercultural group work experience as a mechanism for developing intercultural competence and group work skills. Design/methodology/approach – Using qualitative interviews, the group work experiences of 11 final‐year undergraduate local and international students in a business program in a large Australian university were analysed. Findings – The findings suggest that international and local students working together on group assignments create social and academic situations that result in “at best” limited positive intercultural learning and relationships. Differences in expectations, motivations, language fluency, trust and relationship issues were evident when students collaborated on group assignments. Thus, it appears that group assignments are potentially flawed mechanisms for delivering the goals of intercultural competence and group work skills in business students. Practical implications – Although this exploratory study is limited in scope, the research has implications for pedagogical strategies, in particular, the use and design of group assignments and the preparation of students for working on group tasks in intercultural groups. It also has implications for developing effective learning mechanisms that lead to improved student intercultural competence, greater socio‐cultural engagement and the academic success of international and local business students, as well as positive learning experiences for all. Originality/value – The findings of this study are likely to be a useful resource for university staff considering the use of group work assignments for the development of intercultural understanding and competence and collaborative skills.

Journal

Journal of International Education in BusinessEmerald Publishing

Published: Apr 29, 2014

Keywords: Diversity; Collaborative learning; Internationalisation; Group assignments; Intercultural group work

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$499/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month