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Student perception of learning through a problem‐based learning exercise: an exploratory study

Student perception of learning through a problem‐based learning exercise: an exploratory study Purpose – Staff at Idaho Peace Officer Standards and Training developed a 70‐hour problem‐based learning exercise (PBLE) and integrated this program into the existing Basic Patrol Officer Academy. This paper aims to examine the effectiveness of PBL in developing subject‐specific policing knowledge as well as decision‐making, problem‐solving, and collaboration skills. Design/methodology/approach – Following the PBLE, students completed an in‐depth survey prompting feedback on the ability of the program to develop various skills known to be important to policing. These self‐reported data were collected from 122 students over three academy sessions and evaluated by Chi‐square statistical analysis. Findings – Results indicate that the pilot PBLE is significant in helping students develop new policing skills, demonstrating how information learned in class applies to field work, aiding in recall of class material, developing problem‐solving skills, and learning skills needed to work in groups in the law enforcement field ( p <0.01). Research limitations/implications – This research demonstrates that PBLEs can be effective in developing difficult‐to‐teach skills. The pilot program also helps students discover how material presented in class applies to fieldwork. A program able to bridge the gap between information recall and application would be a significant addition to any training. Originality/value – Research demonstrating the effectiveness of programs based on PBL philosophy is difficult to find, particularly in relation to law police training. The experience of students who have been through the Idaho program is a valuable step towards filling this void. The program also demonstrates that some of the purposed benefits of PBL can be achieved without necessitating a rewrite in training curriculum. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies and Management Emerald Publishing

Student perception of learning through a problem‐based learning exercise: an exploratory study

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References (39)

Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1363-951X
DOI
10.1108/13639510910937094
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – Staff at Idaho Peace Officer Standards and Training developed a 70‐hour problem‐based learning exercise (PBLE) and integrated this program into the existing Basic Patrol Officer Academy. This paper aims to examine the effectiveness of PBL in developing subject‐specific policing knowledge as well as decision‐making, problem‐solving, and collaboration skills. Design/methodology/approach – Following the PBLE, students completed an in‐depth survey prompting feedback on the ability of the program to develop various skills known to be important to policing. These self‐reported data were collected from 122 students over three academy sessions and evaluated by Chi‐square statistical analysis. Findings – Results indicate that the pilot PBLE is significant in helping students develop new policing skills, demonstrating how information learned in class applies to field work, aiding in recall of class material, developing problem‐solving skills, and learning skills needed to work in groups in the law enforcement field ( p <0.01). Research limitations/implications – This research demonstrates that PBLEs can be effective in developing difficult‐to‐teach skills. The pilot program also helps students discover how material presented in class applies to fieldwork. A program able to bridge the gap between information recall and application would be a significant addition to any training. Originality/value – Research demonstrating the effectiveness of programs based on PBL philosophy is difficult to find, particularly in relation to law police training. The experience of students who have been through the Idaho program is a valuable step towards filling this void. The program also demonstrates that some of the purposed benefits of PBL can be achieved without necessitating a rewrite in training curriculum.

Journal

Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies and ManagementEmerald Publishing

Published: Mar 6, 2009

Keywords: Problem‐based learning; Police; Problem solving; Decision making; United States of America

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