Strength Characteristics of Concrete Exposed to Elevated Temperatures and Cooled Under Different Regimes

Strength Characteristics of Concrete Exposed to Elevated Temperatures and Cooled Under Different... Concrete loses strength in the event of accidental fires. The residual strength of normal strength concrete is of vital importance for ascertaining serviceability of buildings after the event of fires. Strength loss in concrete is dependent on the temperature of exposure, its duration and the way it gets cooled. In this study concrete cubes of size 100 mm have been cast for M25 grade of concrete, 28 days water cured. The specimens were subjected to elevated temperatures of 150°C, 250°C, 350°C, 450°C and 550°C with a retention period of 1 hour. After 1 hour of exposure, specimens were allowed to cool under different cooling regimes to ambient temperature. Later their appearance, colour and cracks were observed and also weight losses were determined. Further, destructive tests were conducted to estimate residual compressive and split tensile strengths. Important performance changes have been presented and discussed. Split tensile strengths are related to compressive strengths for all the cases of cooling regimes. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Structural Fire Engineering Emerald Publishing

Strength Characteristics of Concrete Exposed to Elevated Temperatures and Cooled Under Different Regimes

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
2040-2317
DOI
10.1260/2040-2317.3.4.301
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Concrete loses strength in the event of accidental fires. The residual strength of normal strength concrete is of vital importance for ascertaining serviceability of buildings after the event of fires. Strength loss in concrete is dependent on the temperature of exposure, its duration and the way it gets cooled. In this study concrete cubes of size 100 mm have been cast for M25 grade of concrete, 28 days water cured. The specimens were subjected to elevated temperatures of 150°C, 250°C, 350°C, 450°C and 550°C with a retention period of 1 hour. After 1 hour of exposure, specimens were allowed to cool under different cooling regimes to ambient temperature. Later their appearance, colour and cracks were observed and also weight losses were determined. Further, destructive tests were conducted to estimate residual compressive and split tensile strengths. Important performance changes have been presented and discussed. Split tensile strengths are related to compressive strengths for all the cases of cooling regimes.

Journal

Journal of Structural Fire EngineeringEmerald Publishing

Published: Dec 1, 2012

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