“Space I can call my own”: private social clubs in London

“Space I can call my own”: private social clubs in London Explores the experience of the e´lite, private social clubs of London and suggests that they are a flourishing sector of the hospitality industry. The paper suggests that the traditional gentlemen’s club is being joined by a new type of e´lite private social club with more modern conceptions of the “clubbable”. The paper analyses the differences and similarities between the two types of clubs in the areas of gender, value for money, concepts of “e´lite” and the function of a club. The paper contends that private clubs are an increasingly‐significant sector of the hospitality industry, because of the way they fulfil the needs of the late twentieth‐century consumer. They provide high status “niches” for a fragmented social “e´lite” and they fill the space between automated work and leisure. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management Emerald Publishing

“Space I can call my own”: private social clubs in London

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 MCB UP Ltd. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0959-6119
DOI
10.1108/09596110010330769
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Explores the experience of the e´lite, private social clubs of London and suggests that they are a flourishing sector of the hospitality industry. The paper suggests that the traditional gentlemen’s club is being joined by a new type of e´lite private social club with more modern conceptions of the “clubbable”. The paper analyses the differences and similarities between the two types of clubs in the areas of gender, value for money, concepts of “e´lite” and the function of a club. The paper contends that private clubs are an increasingly‐significant sector of the hospitality industry, because of the way they fulfil the needs of the late twentieth‐century consumer. They provide high status “niches” for a fragmented social “e´lite” and they fill the space between automated work and leisure.

Journal

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality ManagementEmerald Publishing

Published: Jul 1, 2000

Keywords: Social clubs; Consumer behaviour

References

  • The Third Wave
    Toffler

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