SOX vs C-SOX: which one works better?

SOX vs C-SOX: which one works better? PurposeThe purpose of this paper is to analyze and compare the influence of the Sarbanes–Oxley (SOX) Act of the USA and the Canadian SOX (C-SOX) through the comparison of corporate acquisitions in these two countries.Design/methodology/approachThe final sample includes 1,187 merger and tender offers undertaken by publicly traded (TSX listed) Canadian firms between 1990 and 2016. The authors use standard event study methodology (Patell, 1976) and Berkovitch and Narayanan’s (1993) seminal method to examine announcement period performance and deal motive, respectively.FindingsThe findings support the pro-regulation hypothesis which states that stricter regulations are more useful. Cross-listed acquirers exposed to SOX regime performed much better (both short- and long-term) than non-cross-listed counterparts with only C-SOX exposure. These findings are both statistically and economically significant.Research limitations/implicationsThis study has direct implications as it provides evidence to the legislatures of the provinces, as well as to the federal government, that stricter regulations are effective and Canada should enact additional corporate legislation. Canada may have fared well in the past, but dynamics are changing and may further change in the future, and therefore, timely and stricter corporate legislation are more appropriate.Practical implicationsThis study has direct implications as it provides evidence to the legislatures of the provinces, as well as to the federal government, that stricter regulations are effective and Canada should enact additional corporate legislation. Canada may have fared well in the past, but dynamics are changing and may further change in the future, and therefore, timely and stricter corporate legislation are more appropriate.Originality/valueThis study contributes to the growing literature of SOX-related studies. This is the first study to investigate comprehensively the differences between the two laws enacted by these neighboring countries. As USA and Canada share largely integrated capital markets and are each other’s biggest trading partner, this genre of research has great value. It is a timely study as the Canadian Federal Government is looking into standardizing corporate legislation across provinces and territories. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Managerial Finance Emerald Publishing

SOX vs C-SOX: which one works better?

Managerial Finance, Volume 44 (8): 16 – Aug 13, 2018

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0307-4358
DOI
10.1108/MF-03-2018-0097
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

PurposeThe purpose of this paper is to analyze and compare the influence of the Sarbanes–Oxley (SOX) Act of the USA and the Canadian SOX (C-SOX) through the comparison of corporate acquisitions in these two countries.Design/methodology/approachThe final sample includes 1,187 merger and tender offers undertaken by publicly traded (TSX listed) Canadian firms between 1990 and 2016. The authors use standard event study methodology (Patell, 1976) and Berkovitch and Narayanan’s (1993) seminal method to examine announcement period performance and deal motive, respectively.FindingsThe findings support the pro-regulation hypothesis which states that stricter regulations are more useful. Cross-listed acquirers exposed to SOX regime performed much better (both short- and long-term) than non-cross-listed counterparts with only C-SOX exposure. These findings are both statistically and economically significant.Research limitations/implicationsThis study has direct implications as it provides evidence to the legislatures of the provinces, as well as to the federal government, that stricter regulations are effective and Canada should enact additional corporate legislation. Canada may have fared well in the past, but dynamics are changing and may further change in the future, and therefore, timely and stricter corporate legislation are more appropriate.Practical implicationsThis study has direct implications as it provides evidence to the legislatures of the provinces, as well as to the federal government, that stricter regulations are effective and Canada should enact additional corporate legislation. Canada may have fared well in the past, but dynamics are changing and may further change in the future, and therefore, timely and stricter corporate legislation are more appropriate.Originality/valueThis study contributes to the growing literature of SOX-related studies. This is the first study to investigate comprehensively the differences between the two laws enacted by these neighboring countries. As USA and Canada share largely integrated capital markets and are each other’s biggest trading partner, this genre of research has great value. It is a timely study as the Canadian Federal Government is looking into standardizing corporate legislation across provinces and territories.

Journal

Managerial FinanceEmerald Publishing

Published: Aug 13, 2018

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