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Sound Publicity

Sound Publicity Aircraft Engineering THE MONTHLY SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL ORGAN OF THE AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING PROFESSION VOL XX No 229 MARCH 1948 As we have said, we are convinced believers in the importance of this type of paper and have quoted these two instances of our readi­ W E make no apology for reproducing here, through the ness to encourage it by publishing examples in these columns. kindness of the Lockheed Aircraft Corporation and the Another paper of the same character which we published last Institute of the Aeronautical Services, the paper on the November was the report on the full-scale test rig which was set up development of the Shooting Star by MR CLARENCE JOHNSON, at the Supermarine Works to test in simulated operational condi­ although this has already appeared in the Institute's journal, because tions the complete fuel system designed for installation in the Super- comparatively few of our British and Continental readers—and even marine Attacker—which is, at the moment of writing, the presumptive of those in the United States—particularly among the students and holder of the 100-kilometre closed-circuit speed record, which is junior members of the Industry, belong to the Institute and therefore awaiting promulgation by the F.A.I. In the same issue we published see its journa l regularly. Nor need we, perhaps, we feel, express any M R BOYAJIAN'S account of the evolution of the simplified structure deep contrition for the fact that the paper appears here over a year for the Republic Seabee; while another instance, which may be men­ after the date of its original reading at a meeting of the Institute, tioned here, is the lecture read last year before the Royal Aero­ since the lag has been largely due to inevitable delay in obtaining nautical Society by M R J. SMITH on the development of the Spitfire prints of the many photographs from America—partly no doubt and Seafire, which is referred to, with MR JOHNSON'S paper, by owing to difficulty in releasing them until after publication in the PROFESSOR LICKLEY in his R.Ae.S. lecture. Journal of the Aeronautical Sciences, which only took place in December. Members of the Royal Aeronautical Society will be Seeing the Light specially interested in the appearance of the paper in these pages These five cases we have cited, four of which have appeared in because it was referred to by PROFESSOR LICKLEY in his recent lecture AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING, show that the prejudice against giving away on 'The Evolution of the Design of an Aeroplane', and they will now information of the nature which they all disclose is tending to die have an opportunity of studying the two together. down. This is undoubtedly a movement which is to be welcomed. Covering the Ground We ourselves have protested over and over again against the deplor­ able attitude of some firms towards the publication for the benefit of It is a happy chance that we have been able to publish M R others of any of the so-called secrets of their trade—a narrow view JOHNSON'S paper so soon after the similar account of the develop­ which we believe to be characteristic of a small-minded outlook. ment of the Republic Rainbow by M R KARTVELI, which appeared For our part we shall be only too glad to afford space to any in the January issue of AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING. We feel very strongly similar articles which may be brought to our notice. They are that this type of report is very much to be encouraged as although, thoroughly practical and usually cover such a wide range that there or possibly because, it does not go deeply into theoretical considera­ is no one to whom some part of them is not of interest. Any practical tions it does tell other designers exactly what they want to know. engineer knows how easy it is for even a promising novelty to be It is of the very greatest practical help to have a frank account, from marred in the development stage; while he will, on the other hand, responsible authorities, of the troubles encountered in the gradual be familiar within his own experience of other apparently impractic­ evolution of a new type of aeroplane from the moment when it is able inventions which have been brought to successful fruition by hardly more than a thought in the designer's mind to the time when careful engineering development. How much more does this apply enough of what are known generically as the 'bugs' have been to the welding together of the numberless components which go to eliminated to make it safe to go into production. make a complete aeroplane. There are inevitably a large number of alternative solutions of various problems in the initial stages of a design to be investigated Experientia Docet and considered before a choice of the best compromise—which it We must apologize for having had this year to divide D R KLEMIN'S usually and almost inevitably proves to be—is arrived at. To set all annual survey of the I.Ae.S. January meetings into two instalments so this preliminary work down on paper is not only doing a real service that only the first portion appears this month, but a glance through to other workers but also to a very large extent forestalls subsequent this issue will show why this has been necessary. We find on looking criticism of this or that feature. To know why a particular type of back through our files that DR KLEMIN has been contributing flap, wing section, or what-not was adopted at least removes the summaries of this nature to AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING since 1936 and possibility of a suggestion that another was not considered, and even if anyone who has ever essayed a similar feat will appreciate how the critic does not agree with the final choice he a t least knows the rea­ outstandingly well he succeeds in conveying in a few words the son for it and is therefore in a better position to form his own opinion. contents and even the 'atmosphere' of a lengthy and abstruse paper. Making it Work Next month we shall publish the concluding portion which At a later stage there begin to appear all the unforeseen difficulties summarizes a number of important papers on Aerodynamics, with and snags which always keep cropping up during the development up-to-date supersonic connotations, and, a new subject to be work on a new aeroplane. The more these are frankly ventilated and approached from a practical as well as a scientific viewpoint, the discussed the more likely are they to be avoided by others; with incidence of flight at very high altitudes. For an opportunity to inestimable advantage to the general progress of the art of aeroplane study in detail the more important of the papers dealt with readers design—which is, when all is said and done, the ultimate object to will have to wait with what patience they may for publication in the which we all are, or should be, devoting our lives. Journal of the Aeronautical Sciences. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

Sound Publicity

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology , Volume 20 (3): 1 – Mar 1, 1948

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb031609
Publisher site
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Abstract

Aircraft Engineering THE MONTHLY SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL ORGAN OF THE AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING PROFESSION VOL XX No 229 MARCH 1948 As we have said, we are convinced believers in the importance of this type of paper and have quoted these two instances of our readi­ W E make no apology for reproducing here, through the ness to encourage it by publishing examples in these columns. kindness of the Lockheed Aircraft Corporation and the Another paper of the same character which we published last Institute of the Aeronautical Services, the paper on the November was the report on the full-scale test rig which was set up development of the Shooting Star by MR CLARENCE JOHNSON, at the Supermarine Works to test in simulated operational condi­ although this has already appeared in the Institute's journal, because tions the complete fuel system designed for installation in the Super- comparatively few of our British and Continental readers—and even marine Attacker—which is, at the moment of writing, the presumptive of those in the United States—particularly among the students and holder of the 100-kilometre closed-circuit speed record, which is junior members of the Industry, belong to the Institute and therefore awaiting promulgation by the F.A.I. In the same issue we published see its journa l regularly. Nor need we, perhaps, we feel, express any M R BOYAJIAN'S account of the evolution of the simplified structure deep contrition for the fact that the paper appears here over a year for the Republic Seabee; while another instance, which may be men­ after the date of its original reading at a meeting of the Institute, tioned here, is the lecture read last year before the Royal Aero­ since the lag has been largely due to inevitable delay in obtaining nautical Society by M R J. SMITH on the development of the Spitfire prints of the many photographs from America—partly no doubt and Seafire, which is referred to, with MR JOHNSON'S paper, by owing to difficulty in releasing them until after publication in the PROFESSOR LICKLEY in his R.Ae.S. lecture. Journal of the Aeronautical Sciences, which only took place in December. Members of the Royal Aeronautical Society will be Seeing the Light specially interested in the appearance of the paper in these pages These five cases we have cited, four of which have appeared in because it was referred to by PROFESSOR LICKLEY in his recent lecture AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING, show that the prejudice against giving away on 'The Evolution of the Design of an Aeroplane', and they will now information of the nature which they all disclose is tending to die have an opportunity of studying the two together. down. This is undoubtedly a movement which is to be welcomed. Covering the Ground We ourselves have protested over and over again against the deplor­ able attitude of some firms towards the publication for the benefit of It is a happy chance that we have been able to publish M R others of any of the so-called secrets of their trade—a narrow view JOHNSON'S paper so soon after the similar account of the develop­ which we believe to be characteristic of a small-minded outlook. ment of the Republic Rainbow by M R KARTVELI, which appeared For our part we shall be only too glad to afford space to any in the January issue of AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING. We feel very strongly similar articles which may be brought to our notice. They are that this type of report is very much to be encouraged as although, thoroughly practical and usually cover such a wide range that there or possibly because, it does not go deeply into theoretical considera­ is no one to whom some part of them is not of interest. Any practical tions it does tell other designers exactly what they want to know. engineer knows how easy it is for even a promising novelty to be It is of the very greatest practical help to have a frank account, from marred in the development stage; while he will, on the other hand, responsible authorities, of the troubles encountered in the gradual be familiar within his own experience of other apparently impractic­ evolution of a new type of aeroplane from the moment when it is able inventions which have been brought to successful fruition by hardly more than a thought in the designer's mind to the time when careful engineering development. How much more does this apply enough of what are known generically as the 'bugs' have been to the welding together of the numberless components which go to eliminated to make it safe to go into production. make a complete aeroplane. There are inevitably a large number of alternative solutions of various problems in the initial stages of a design to be investigated Experientia Docet and considered before a choice of the best compromise—which it We must apologize for having had this year to divide D R KLEMIN'S usually and almost inevitably proves to be—is arrived at. To set all annual survey of the I.Ae.S. January meetings into two instalments so this preliminary work down on paper is not only doing a real service that only the first portion appears this month, but a glance through to other workers but also to a very large extent forestalls subsequent this issue will show why this has been necessary. We find on looking criticism of this or that feature. To know why a particular type of back through our files that DR KLEMIN has been contributing flap, wing section, or what-not was adopted at least removes the summaries of this nature to AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING since 1936 and possibility of a suggestion that another was not considered, and even if anyone who has ever essayed a similar feat will appreciate how the critic does not agree with the final choice he a t least knows the rea­ outstandingly well he succeeds in conveying in a few words the son for it and is therefore in a better position to form his own opinion. contents and even the 'atmosphere' of a lengthy and abstruse paper. Making it Work Next month we shall publish the concluding portion which At a later stage there begin to appear all the unforeseen difficulties summarizes a number of important papers on Aerodynamics, with and snags which always keep cropping up during the development up-to-date supersonic connotations, and, a new subject to be work on a new aeroplane. The more these are frankly ventilated and approached from a practical as well as a scientific viewpoint, the discussed the more likely are they to be avoided by others; with incidence of flight at very high altitudes. For an opportunity to inestimable advantage to the general progress of the art of aeroplane study in detail the more important of the papers dealt with readers design—which is, when all is said and done, the ultimate object to will have to wait with what patience they may for publication in the which we all are, or should be, devoting our lives. Journal of the Aeronautical Sciences.

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Mar 1, 1948

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