Something old, something used Determinants of women's purchase of vintage fashion vs second‐hand fashion

Something old, something used Determinants of women's purchase of vintage fashion vs... Purpose – Vintage has been a growing trend in clothing recently, leading to major fashion brands launching collections inspired by vintage pieces or luxury haute‐couture houses digging into their archives to revive past designs. Yet, as this market develops, little is known about the profile of the consumer and the motivations to purchase vintage. This paper aims to explore the veracity of a number of assumptions relating to vintage consumption, equating it to the consumption of used, previously owned clothes by nostalgic prone, environmentally‐friendly or value‐conscious consumers. Design/methodology/approach – A quantitative approach including structural equation modeling (SEM) was employed in this research using data collected from 103 women (screened on past second‐hand purchases). Vintage clothes were defined as pieces dating back from the 1920s to the 1980s. Second hand clothes were defined as modern used clothes. Findings – The results show that the main antecedents to vintage consumption are fashion involvement and nostalgia proneness as well as need for uniqueness through the mediation of treasure hunting. In contrast, second‐hand consumption is directly driven by frugality. Eco‐consciousness plays an indirect role through bargain hunting. In essence, the thrill of the hunt is present for vintage and for second hand consumption. Yet, while vintage consumers shop for a unique piece with history, second‐hand consumers shop for a unique piece at a good price. Additionally, the main characteristics of vintage fashion consumers are a higher level of education and higher income whereas age is not directly related to the purchase of vintage pieces. Originality/value – The paper discusses the relevance of second‐hand stores repositioning as vintage based on vintage and second‐hand consumers' profiles. Also, the need to educate consumers on the role of second‐hand consumption in a pro‐environmental lifestyle is highlighted. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management Emerald Publishing

Something old, something used Determinants of women's purchase of vintage fashion vs second‐hand fashion

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2012 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0959-0552
DOI
10.1108/09590551211274946
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – Vintage has been a growing trend in clothing recently, leading to major fashion brands launching collections inspired by vintage pieces or luxury haute‐couture houses digging into their archives to revive past designs. Yet, as this market develops, little is known about the profile of the consumer and the motivations to purchase vintage. This paper aims to explore the veracity of a number of assumptions relating to vintage consumption, equating it to the consumption of used, previously owned clothes by nostalgic prone, environmentally‐friendly or value‐conscious consumers. Design/methodology/approach – A quantitative approach including structural equation modeling (SEM) was employed in this research using data collected from 103 women (screened on past second‐hand purchases). Vintage clothes were defined as pieces dating back from the 1920s to the 1980s. Second hand clothes were defined as modern used clothes. Findings – The results show that the main antecedents to vintage consumption are fashion involvement and nostalgia proneness as well as need for uniqueness through the mediation of treasure hunting. In contrast, second‐hand consumption is directly driven by frugality. Eco‐consciousness plays an indirect role through bargain hunting. In essence, the thrill of the hunt is present for vintage and for second hand consumption. Yet, while vintage consumers shop for a unique piece with history, second‐hand consumers shop for a unique piece at a good price. Additionally, the main characteristics of vintage fashion consumers are a higher level of education and higher income whereas age is not directly related to the purchase of vintage pieces. Originality/value – The paper discusses the relevance of second‐hand stores repositioning as vintage based on vintage and second‐hand consumers' profiles. Also, the need to educate consumers on the role of second‐hand consumption in a pro‐environmental lifestyle is highlighted.

Journal

International Journal of Retail & Distribution ManagementEmerald Publishing

Published: Nov 9, 2012

Keywords: Fashion; Vintage; Second‐hand; Luxury; Eco‐fashion; Nostalgia; Consumer behaviour; Women; Buying behaviour; Second‐hand markets; Clothing

References

  • Fashion involvement, self‐monitoring and the meaning of brands
    Auty, S.; Elliott, R.
  • Need for uniqueness: shopping mall preference and choice activity
    Burns, D.J.; Warren, H.B.
  • Apparel involvement and advertisement processing: a model
    Kim, H.‐S.; Damhorst, M.L.; Lee, K.‐H.
  • An investigation of young fashion consumers' disposal habits
    Morgan, L.R.; Birtwistle, G.
  • Fashion clothing consumption: antecedents and consequences of fashion clothing involvement
    O'Cass, A.
  • Exploring the subtle relationships between environmental concern and ecologically conscious consumer behavior
    Roberts, J.A.; Bacon, D.R.

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