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Some Books Recently Received

Some Books Recently Received December, 1936 AIRCRAF T ENGINEERING A New Edition of Professor Warner's "Performance"— Books on a Variety of Subjects Airplan e Design — Performance. By Professor Warner's style throughout is emin­ determined for the metals concerned—iron, Edward P. Warner, A.B., M.S. (McGraw- ently practical and readable. All whose prim­ chromium, manganese, beryllium, cadmium, ary concern is th e design of aeroplanes will feel Hill. 36s.) magnesium, tin, etc.—are included. tha t here is a man wh o thoroughly understands The rapid growth of aeronautics in th e past wha t they want and is doing his best to give Flugzeu g - Typenbuch , 1936. (Beyer. nine years has caused Professor Warner to it to them. The treatment is physical rather Leipzig. Rm, 6.) divide th e second edition of his treatise on aero­ tha n mathematical. Though the important This book contains in catalogue form par­ plane design into two volumes, of which this is results of theory are quoted, we are nowhere ticulars of all the principal products of the th e first. The laconic sub-title " Performance " immersed in a sea of symbols. The book is German aeronautical and allied industries. docs not suggest how wide is th e field covered. plentifully supplied with references to British, Aeroplanes, gliders, engines, airscrews, para­ All branches of th e subject which relate to th e American and German publications. chutes, instruments and all kind s of components steady motion of th e aeroplane are touched on. This work is a compendium of up-to-the- and accessories, are included. It thus con­ Stability and control and disturbed motion minut e information on all tha t relates to per­ stitutes an invaluable guide to the German generally are reserved for the second volume formance prediction. Either novice or expert industry. yet to be published. will find it invaluable, and both author and Fesselflugzeugen . By Valentin Oesterle. The first three chapters deal with definitions publisher arc t o be congratulated. and with the general principles of air-flow and (Beyer. Leipzig. Rm. 2.40.) H . B. H. th e properties of aerofoils. These subjects are A surprisingly complete manual on the then treated in greater detail in the following construction and flying of kites in modern and Interavia A.B.C., 1936 . six chapters. A minor criticism of th e arrange­ up-to-date forms of the existence of which one This reference book is a monumental work ment is tha t many cross-references are thereby had no conception. Some of the types illus­ which sets out to attain the impossible, and necessary. trate d bear remarkable resemblance to present- achieves it. Until one ha d seen it, it would be day aeroplanes, while others are of th e familiar The vortex theory of aerofoils is clearly and impossible to believe tha t so much information fully described in physical terms. Formula; are box pattern. An unusual book on a subject on the military and civil organization of th e air given for calculating many different shapes an d which one imagined was no longer a living world in every country could be collected and combinations. A chapter is devoted to bound­ one. gathered together within covers. As far as can ary-layer and skin-friction and the importance be judged it is astonishingly accurate. The De r Erste Flieger—Otto Lilicnthal. Bv of Reynolds Number on the flow in the arrangement, by which the name and addres s of boundary - lay explained. Enough basic G.Halle . (U.D.I. Berlin. Rm. 4.80.) th e responsible body dealing with any aspect theory is given for th e reade r to understan d th e This is a tribute to th e great German pioneer of aviation in any country can be found in a underlying principles. which puts his work in correct relation to that moment, is extraordinarily simple. It is of his predecessors and contemporaries. Many interesting and important matters absolutely indispensable and fills all who have Historically, a most interesting book. which often get but perfunctory treatment in essayed a similar task, even on strictly limited text-books are discussed. These include the national lines, with admiration and envy. Th e Airplane and Its Engine. By C. H. effects of compressibility and the compress­ Chatfield, C. F. Taylor and S. Ober. ibility stall, aerofoils specially adapted for (McGraw-Hill. 18s.) velocities approaching that of sound, control Diese l Aircraft Engines. (Paul I-I. Wilkin­ of the boundary-layer by pressure or suction, Mr. Ober's name has been added to the title son. Brooklyn. 4 dollars.) ground interference, and th e action of rotating page of this book since the previous edition After brief introductory chapters on the cylinders. appeared in 1932. The first edition was re­ history and mention of some aircraft fitted with viewed at length in AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING, Variable-lift devices have a chapter of some Diesel engines the book gets down to business Vol. I, August, 1929, p . 212, when it was forty-five pages to themselves. Such devices with a series of tabulate d details of th e principal recommended to th e general public and students are becoming indispensable to th e modern aero­ features of the existing types of compression- in schools and colleges. It has again been plane and thi s summary is admirable. It com­ ignition aero-engines, which appear to be revised and brought up t o date and remains an prises all th e type s in common use such as split reliable though some of them are necessarily excellent semi-technical handbook which com­ flaps, Zap flaps, Fowler flaps, leading edge out of date and in some instances the engines pares favourably with many more pretentious flaps, slotted wings, and even a rotor-aerofoil themselves can scarcely be said to exist. The publications. combination. next chapter on constructional details suffers The twelfth chapter has the simple title from lack of balance owing no doubt to the International Organisation in Air Trans­ " Parasite Drag " and covers some hundred varying willingness of the firms concerned to port . By L. C. Tombs. (Columbia Univer­ supply information. Then follow chapters on pages. From an immense mass of information sity Press [Oxford University Press]. 15s.) fuel injection systems, superchargers and on the resistance of fuselages, engine nacelles, The scope of this book is best indicated by a "Diese l fuels." The concluding chapters on undercarriages, floats, hulls, radiators, wires quotation from the Introduction: " Th e "Advantage s for airline operation" and and struts, a judicious selection has been made purpose of this book is not to support the idea and the significant results presented. The two "Futur e development" are necessarily con­ of the internationalization of civil aviation, or following chapters deal with the engine and th e troversial. The whole of the information is any other policy. It is rathe r to indicate what airscrew. Variations of engine power with collected in a table at th e end. An interesting are the existing elements of international height, speed, and boost pressure are compactly and useful book for reference. organization in European air transport, how described. The airscrew chapter is concerned such elements have come about in the face of mainly with the choice of th e right airscrew for Lynx IV* Aero Engine. (H.M. Stationery national reactions, and what is their real particular conditions and interference between Office. 3s. 6d.) significance." Starting with a historical th e airscrew and body or wing. For basic survey, the autho r summarises the Air Conven­ One of the invaluable series of Air Ministry theory the reade r is referred to specialist works. tion and proceeds to detail the provisions of handbooks on engines used in the Royal Air I n the last three chapters we are shown how various bilateral agreements made between Force. the results for th e individual parts are buil t up nations to cover the operation of inter-state air into performance curves and how these arc lines. The functions and work of the I.C.A.N, Physica l Constants of Pure Metals. (H.M. interpreted. In addition many formute and and other bodies (such as the I.A.T.A.) are Stationery Office. (3d.) charts arc given for the rapid prediction of then described. Though marred by a wholly hypothetical designs. Methods of performance This booklet collects the dat a obtained over inadequate bibliography, the book (whose testing and th e reduction of full-scale measure­ th e past fifteen years or so in th e Physics and author is a Member of th e Communications and ments are not mentioned. It is t o b e regretted Metallurgy Departments of the National Transit Section of the League of Nations tha t the author did not find room for some Physical Laboratory, covering in Par t I Metals Secretariat) adequately covers its subject; observations on this head, because inaccurate of the highest attainable purity and in Par t II which is, however, tolerably familiar to most testing of th e final result may vitiat e th e results samples of metals of high commercial purity. of those engaged in aviation. of the most careful preliminary work. All the physical data which have so far been http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

Some Books Recently Received

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology , Volume 8 (12): 1 – Dec 1, 1936

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb030128
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Abstract

December, 1936 AIRCRAF T ENGINEERING A New Edition of Professor Warner's "Performance"— Books on a Variety of Subjects Airplan e Design — Performance. By Professor Warner's style throughout is emin­ determined for the metals concerned—iron, Edward P. Warner, A.B., M.S. (McGraw- ently practical and readable. All whose prim­ chromium, manganese, beryllium, cadmium, ary concern is th e design of aeroplanes will feel Hill. 36s.) magnesium, tin, etc.—are included. tha t here is a man wh o thoroughly understands The rapid growth of aeronautics in th e past wha t they want and is doing his best to give Flugzeu g - Typenbuch , 1936. (Beyer. nine years has caused Professor Warner to it to them. The treatment is physical rather Leipzig. Rm, 6.) divide th e second edition of his treatise on aero­ tha n mathematical. Though the important This book contains in catalogue form par­ plane design into two volumes, of which this is results of theory are quoted, we are nowhere ticulars of all the principal products of the th e first. The laconic sub-title " Performance " immersed in a sea of symbols. The book is German aeronautical and allied industries. docs not suggest how wide is th e field covered. plentifully supplied with references to British, Aeroplanes, gliders, engines, airscrews, para­ All branches of th e subject which relate to th e American and German publications. chutes, instruments and all kind s of components steady motion of th e aeroplane are touched on. This work is a compendium of up-to-the- and accessories, are included. It thus con­ Stability and control and disturbed motion minut e information on all tha t relates to per­ stitutes an invaluable guide to the German generally are reserved for the second volume formance prediction. Either novice or expert industry. yet to be published. will find it invaluable, and both author and Fesselflugzeugen . By Valentin Oesterle. The first three chapters deal with definitions publisher arc t o be congratulated. and with the general principles of air-flow and (Beyer. Leipzig. Rm. 2.40.) H . B. H. th e properties of aerofoils. These subjects are A surprisingly complete manual on the then treated in greater detail in the following construction and flying of kites in modern and Interavia A.B.C., 1936 . six chapters. A minor criticism of th e arrange­ up-to-date forms of the existence of which one This reference book is a monumental work ment is tha t many cross-references are thereby had no conception. Some of the types illus­ which sets out to attain the impossible, and necessary. trate d bear remarkable resemblance to present- achieves it. Until one ha d seen it, it would be day aeroplanes, while others are of th e familiar The vortex theory of aerofoils is clearly and impossible to believe tha t so much information fully described in physical terms. Formula; are box pattern. An unusual book on a subject on the military and civil organization of th e air given for calculating many different shapes an d which one imagined was no longer a living world in every country could be collected and combinations. A chapter is devoted to bound­ one. gathered together within covers. As far as can ary-layer and skin-friction and the importance be judged it is astonishingly accurate. The De r Erste Flieger—Otto Lilicnthal. Bv of Reynolds Number on the flow in the arrangement, by which the name and addres s of boundary - lay explained. Enough basic G.Halle . (U.D.I. Berlin. Rm. 4.80.) th e responsible body dealing with any aspect theory is given for th e reade r to understan d th e This is a tribute to th e great German pioneer of aviation in any country can be found in a underlying principles. which puts his work in correct relation to that moment, is extraordinarily simple. It is of his predecessors and contemporaries. Many interesting and important matters absolutely indispensable and fills all who have Historically, a most interesting book. which often get but perfunctory treatment in essayed a similar task, even on strictly limited text-books are discussed. These include the national lines, with admiration and envy. Th e Airplane and Its Engine. By C. H. effects of compressibility and the compress­ Chatfield, C. F. Taylor and S. Ober. ibility stall, aerofoils specially adapted for (McGraw-Hill. 18s.) velocities approaching that of sound, control Diese l Aircraft Engines. (Paul I-I. Wilkin­ of the boundary-layer by pressure or suction, Mr. Ober's name has been added to the title son. Brooklyn. 4 dollars.) ground interference, and th e action of rotating page of this book since the previous edition After brief introductory chapters on the cylinders. appeared in 1932. The first edition was re­ history and mention of some aircraft fitted with viewed at length in AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING, Variable-lift devices have a chapter of some Diesel engines the book gets down to business Vol. I, August, 1929, p . 212, when it was forty-five pages to themselves. Such devices with a series of tabulate d details of th e principal recommended to th e general public and students are becoming indispensable to th e modern aero­ features of the existing types of compression- in schools and colleges. It has again been plane and thi s summary is admirable. It com­ ignition aero-engines, which appear to be revised and brought up t o date and remains an prises all th e type s in common use such as split reliable though some of them are necessarily excellent semi-technical handbook which com­ flaps, Zap flaps, Fowler flaps, leading edge out of date and in some instances the engines pares favourably with many more pretentious flaps, slotted wings, and even a rotor-aerofoil themselves can scarcely be said to exist. The publications. combination. next chapter on constructional details suffers The twelfth chapter has the simple title from lack of balance owing no doubt to the International Organisation in Air Trans­ " Parasite Drag " and covers some hundred varying willingness of the firms concerned to port . By L. C. Tombs. (Columbia Univer­ supply information. Then follow chapters on pages. From an immense mass of information sity Press [Oxford University Press]. 15s.) fuel injection systems, superchargers and on the resistance of fuselages, engine nacelles, The scope of this book is best indicated by a "Diese l fuels." The concluding chapters on undercarriages, floats, hulls, radiators, wires quotation from the Introduction: " Th e "Advantage s for airline operation" and and struts, a judicious selection has been made purpose of this book is not to support the idea and the significant results presented. The two "Futur e development" are necessarily con­ of the internationalization of civil aviation, or following chapters deal with the engine and th e troversial. The whole of the information is any other policy. It is rathe r to indicate what airscrew. Variations of engine power with collected in a table at th e end. An interesting are the existing elements of international height, speed, and boost pressure are compactly and useful book for reference. organization in European air transport, how described. The airscrew chapter is concerned such elements have come about in the face of mainly with the choice of th e right airscrew for Lynx IV* Aero Engine. (H.M. Stationery national reactions, and what is their real particular conditions and interference between Office. 3s. 6d.) significance." Starting with a historical th e airscrew and body or wing. For basic survey, the autho r summarises the Air Conven­ One of the invaluable series of Air Ministry theory the reade r is referred to specialist works. tion and proceeds to detail the provisions of handbooks on engines used in the Royal Air I n the last three chapters we are shown how various bilateral agreements made between Force. the results for th e individual parts are buil t up nations to cover the operation of inter-state air into performance curves and how these arc lines. The functions and work of the I.C.A.N, Physica l Constants of Pure Metals. (H.M. interpreted. In addition many formute and and other bodies (such as the I.A.T.A.) are Stationery Office. (3d.) charts arc given for the rapid prediction of then described. Though marred by a wholly hypothetical designs. Methods of performance This booklet collects the dat a obtained over inadequate bibliography, the book (whose testing and th e reduction of full-scale measure­ th e past fifteen years or so in th e Physics and author is a Member of th e Communications and ments are not mentioned. It is t o b e regretted Metallurgy Departments of the National Transit Section of the League of Nations tha t the author did not find room for some Physical Laboratory, covering in Par t I Metals Secretariat) adequately covers its subject; observations on this head, because inaccurate of the highest attainable purity and in Par t II which is, however, tolerably familiar to most testing of th e final result may vitiat e th e results samples of metals of high commercial purity. of those engaged in aviation. of the most careful preliminary work. All the physical data which have so far been

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Dec 1, 1936

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