Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

Some Books Recently Received

Some Books Recently Received April, 1937 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERIN G 103 A New Edition of Diehl's Engineering Aerodynamics and Books on Various Subjects Engineerin g Aerodynamics. By Walter A short bu t useful chapter discusses the effect Those who are familiar with Air Commodore Stuar t Diehl. Revised Edition. (Ronald on design of fundamental parameters such as Charlton's writings will know what to expect Press Company, New York. $7.00.) wing loading, power loading, and aspect ratio. from his pen. The first half of the book con­ No branch of aerodynamics is left untouched The aerodynamic problems of the seaplane sists of a highly-coloured account of the damage in this book and with so wide a scope the treat­ (boat and float) have a chapter to themselves. wrought by German air raids on England during ment has inevitably to be selective and con­ Last, but by no means least, is a discussion on 1914-1918. Then follows a disturbing picture densed. The book is not for the novice; to full-scale flight testing and performance reduc­ of what may happen during the next war; the get full value from it the reader must have a tion, an important branch of the subject too character of which may be indicated by the working knowledge of the subject. To such often ignored. last sentence, which reads, "England was merely a one its pages are stimulating and informative. The lay-out of the book is excellent, the type advised to sign, like France, on the dotted The first two chapters deal compactly with clear and the diagrams well drawn and plentiful. line and, like France, England did." The final fundamental definitions, symbols, and the Many references to original sources are given. section describes "th e last war " twenty years A.B.C. of the mechanics of fluids. The next A disconcerting Americanism is the abbrevia­ later, in which England having learnt her chapter, under the heading "Applied Wing tion of abbreviations: thus r.p.m. is written lesson emerged rapidly victorious, owing to the Theory " covers the calculations of aerofoil rp m and b.h.p. becomes bhp, etc. overwhelming strength of her air forces. Not characteristics by the vortex theory. An This volume is a most valuable compendium a book for those subject to "nigh t terrors," but interesting feature of this, as of several other which should be at every designer's elbow. doubtless with its uses as propaganda among chapters, is the inclusion of historical notes on The material is well selected and the presenta­ the unthinking. origins. tion succinct. Both author and publisher are Ai r Strategy. By Lieutenant-General N. N. In the succeeding chapter on wind-tunnel to be congratulated. H. B. H. Golovine. (Gale & Polden. 7s. 6d.) tests are simple explanations of the principles of Tip s for Turners. By W. F. Watson. (The This is a reasoned study of the higher strategy dynamic similarity, in physical rather than Manual Press. 2s. 6d.) of the air. It deals with recent technical pro­ mathematical terms, and of the uses and This is intended as a manual of workshop gress in aircraft and its effects on the uses of the limitations of the wind tunnel as a design practice for mechanics and is full of sound Air Arm. The author advocates Independent instrument. advice and hints of practical value to all en­ Air Forces for "strategic defence" and gaged in the operation of machines. Prospect­ Chapters 5 and 6 deal respectively with the "strategi c offence" in addition to a force for ive ground engineers, for example, will find it plain aerofoil and the aerofoil adorned with co-operation in strategical duties with the Army, of much assistance to them. flaps or other high lift devices. In addition to Navy and Dominion Forces. To a limited th e usual aerofoil features, surface roughness Flughlehre . By R. V. Mises. (Julius Spinger, extent, the subject of what should more accur­ and protuberances are discussed in the light of Berlin. Rm. 13.50.) ately be described as air "tactics" is also the most recent American results. The author This is a popular handbook on elementary covered; such matters as the relative merits of suggests that the efficiency of a flapped wing aerodynamics and engine and airscrew theory, single- and two-seater fighters being discussed. should be assessed by comparison with a plain which covers the ground on more or less familiar A thoughtful book, essentially provocative in wing giving the same stalling speed. This lines very satisfactorily and should be useful to character, from which much is to be learnt, method ignores both the saving in structure students as an introduction to the subjects. though it is doubtful if the author's conclusions weight by reduced wing area and the added Aircraft of the British Empire. By Leonard will receive acceptance. weight for the flap gear. Six types of flap are Bridgman. (Sampson Low, Marston. 5s.) Ho w to Buy Timber. By R. R. Rivers. discussed, the plain flap, the slot-and-flap, the This little book contains photographs with (Pitman. 3s. fid.) plain split flap, the Zap flap, the aerofoil flap in most instances scale drawings of all the This is a handbook on the choice and selection and the Fowler flap. Their value is considered principal types of British aeroplane, mili­ of timber for various uses for architects, both for high lift and high drag. The author tary , commercial and private. Except where carpenters, cabinet - makers, motor - body expresses the interesting opinion that to reduce the information is secret a brief description, builders, etc. Its application to aviation is not change of trim when the flap is lowered the with particulars of construction, dimensions and very close though anyone dealing with timber high wing monoplane is to be preferred to the performance, is given. It is in a most handy for any purpose will be better informed for low wing. form and gives an enormous amount of informa­ having read it. tion at an exceedingly cheap price. The next chapter is wider in range than its Th e Welding and Cutting Year Book. Britis h Standard Glossary of Acoustical title, "Static Stability and Control," suggests. (Temsbank Publishing Co., Ltd. 5s.) I t deals with the aerodynamic lay-out of the Term s and Definitions. (British Standards This little book deals with all forms of welding aeroplane generally, the proper areas for fixed Institution . 3s. (id.) and gives useful information on the welding of and movable control surfaces, control surface An authoritative list of the terms and their various classes of material, ferrous and non- design and flutter prevention. Some interest­ meanings used in modern acoustical research. ferrous. ing examples of apparent instabilities are A necessity for anyone working on the reduction Inspectio n of Aircraft After Overhaul. By quoted. Inertia effects on the part s of a control of noise in aeroplanes. S. J. Norton. (Pitman. 3s. fid.) circuit may for example simulate instability of Guide for Flying Instructors. (The Guild A third, revised, edition of a book the two the aeroplane. The author advises a larger of Air Pilots and Air Navigators of the previous editions of which have already been dihedral than is common in British practice. British Empire. 5s. fid.) noticed in these columns. In his view this should never be less than One imagines that this guide will be essen­ Airplan e and Engine Maintenance for the 3 deg.; for a low wing tapered monoplane it tial for any pilot desiring to qualify as an Airplan e Mechanic. By D. J. Bremin and should be 6 deg. The chapter on "Dynamic instructor. It gives details of the requirements H. E. Burgess. (Pitman. 7s. fid.) Stability " contains a concise summary of the for all Flying Instructor's Certificates and then This American handbook on the maintenance classic stability theory. It gives approximate goes through the courses of instruction for flying of aeroplanes is for some reason reproduced in formula; for those derivatives which can be landplanes, seaplanes and autogiros, and con­ fascimile type instead of print, which gives it simplified. cludes with hints on instrument flying. an amateurish appearance and makes it difficult Chapter 9 gives useful data on parasite drag Meta l Castings. By H. L. Campbell. (Wiley t o read. The illustrations in particular are and in the succeeding four chapters are con­ and Chapman & Hall. 15s.) most unsatisfactorily reproduced. It is entirely sidered the engine and airscrew characteristics This is an American textbook on foundry American in outlook and language, but has and the calculation of performance proper, practice. It is designed to help students in the interest as giving details of construction and comprising speed, climb and ceiling. The data stud y of the materials and processes employed repair practice in the United States. are up-to-date and are presented as directly in the production of metal castings of all types. useful curves and formula;. A chapter on Riggin g and Airframes. By J. Campbell I t is, of course, primarily concerned with cast- "Special " performance problems includes take­ Corlett. (Pitman. 5s.) iron, but having dealt fully with this has off and landing. Why writers of aerodynamic chapters on the special problems of steel and An admirable little textbook for riggers, text-books should, as they usually do, call these the non-ferrous metals. describing the tools required, materials used in two inescapable operations "special," we have Wa r Over England. By Air-Commodore aeroplanes and different types of construction, never understood. L. E. O. Chariton. (Longmans, Green. 12s. 6d.) with excellent hints on assembly and truing up http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

Some Books Recently Received

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology , Volume 9 (4): 1 – Apr 1, 1937

Loading next page...
 
/lp/emerald-publishing/some-books-recently-received-mE3DGS1LJq
Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb030169
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

April, 1937 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERIN G 103 A New Edition of Diehl's Engineering Aerodynamics and Books on Various Subjects Engineerin g Aerodynamics. By Walter A short bu t useful chapter discusses the effect Those who are familiar with Air Commodore Stuar t Diehl. Revised Edition. (Ronald on design of fundamental parameters such as Charlton's writings will know what to expect Press Company, New York. $7.00.) wing loading, power loading, and aspect ratio. from his pen. The first half of the book con­ No branch of aerodynamics is left untouched The aerodynamic problems of the seaplane sists of a highly-coloured account of the damage in this book and with so wide a scope the treat­ (boat and float) have a chapter to themselves. wrought by German air raids on England during ment has inevitably to be selective and con­ Last, but by no means least, is a discussion on 1914-1918. Then follows a disturbing picture densed. The book is not for the novice; to full-scale flight testing and performance reduc­ of what may happen during the next war; the get full value from it the reader must have a tion, an important branch of the subject too character of which may be indicated by the working knowledge of the subject. To such often ignored. last sentence, which reads, "England was merely a one its pages are stimulating and informative. The lay-out of the book is excellent, the type advised to sign, like France, on the dotted The first two chapters deal compactly with clear and the diagrams well drawn and plentiful. line and, like France, England did." The final fundamental definitions, symbols, and the Many references to original sources are given. section describes "th e last war " twenty years A.B.C. of the mechanics of fluids. The next A disconcerting Americanism is the abbrevia­ later, in which England having learnt her chapter, under the heading "Applied Wing tion of abbreviations: thus r.p.m. is written lesson emerged rapidly victorious, owing to the Theory " covers the calculations of aerofoil rp m and b.h.p. becomes bhp, etc. overwhelming strength of her air forces. Not characteristics by the vortex theory. An This volume is a most valuable compendium a book for those subject to "nigh t terrors," but interesting feature of this, as of several other which should be at every designer's elbow. doubtless with its uses as propaganda among chapters, is the inclusion of historical notes on The material is well selected and the presenta­ the unthinking. origins. tion succinct. Both author and publisher are Ai r Strategy. By Lieutenant-General N. N. In the succeeding chapter on wind-tunnel to be congratulated. H. B. H. Golovine. (Gale & Polden. 7s. 6d.) tests are simple explanations of the principles of Tip s for Turners. By W. F. Watson. (The This is a reasoned study of the higher strategy dynamic similarity, in physical rather than Manual Press. 2s. 6d.) of the air. It deals with recent technical pro­ mathematical terms, and of the uses and This is intended as a manual of workshop gress in aircraft and its effects on the uses of the limitations of the wind tunnel as a design practice for mechanics and is full of sound Air Arm. The author advocates Independent instrument. advice and hints of practical value to all en­ Air Forces for "strategic defence" and gaged in the operation of machines. Prospect­ Chapters 5 and 6 deal respectively with the "strategi c offence" in addition to a force for ive ground engineers, for example, will find it plain aerofoil and the aerofoil adorned with co-operation in strategical duties with the Army, of much assistance to them. flaps or other high lift devices. In addition to Navy and Dominion Forces. To a limited th e usual aerofoil features, surface roughness Flughlehre . By R. V. Mises. (Julius Spinger, extent, the subject of what should more accur­ and protuberances are discussed in the light of Berlin. Rm. 13.50.) ately be described as air "tactics" is also the most recent American results. The author This is a popular handbook on elementary covered; such matters as the relative merits of suggests that the efficiency of a flapped wing aerodynamics and engine and airscrew theory, single- and two-seater fighters being discussed. should be assessed by comparison with a plain which covers the ground on more or less familiar A thoughtful book, essentially provocative in wing giving the same stalling speed. This lines very satisfactorily and should be useful to character, from which much is to be learnt, method ignores both the saving in structure students as an introduction to the subjects. though it is doubtful if the author's conclusions weight by reduced wing area and the added Aircraft of the British Empire. By Leonard will receive acceptance. weight for the flap gear. Six types of flap are Bridgman. (Sampson Low, Marston. 5s.) Ho w to Buy Timber. By R. R. Rivers. discussed, the plain flap, the slot-and-flap, the This little book contains photographs with (Pitman. 3s. fid.) plain split flap, the Zap flap, the aerofoil flap in most instances scale drawings of all the This is a handbook on the choice and selection and the Fowler flap. Their value is considered principal types of British aeroplane, mili­ of timber for various uses for architects, both for high lift and high drag. The author tary , commercial and private. Except where carpenters, cabinet - makers, motor - body expresses the interesting opinion that to reduce the information is secret a brief description, builders, etc. Its application to aviation is not change of trim when the flap is lowered the with particulars of construction, dimensions and very close though anyone dealing with timber high wing monoplane is to be preferred to the performance, is given. It is in a most handy for any purpose will be better informed for low wing. form and gives an enormous amount of informa­ having read it. tion at an exceedingly cheap price. The next chapter is wider in range than its Th e Welding and Cutting Year Book. Britis h Standard Glossary of Acoustical title, "Static Stability and Control," suggests. (Temsbank Publishing Co., Ltd. 5s.) I t deals with the aerodynamic lay-out of the Term s and Definitions. (British Standards This little book deals with all forms of welding aeroplane generally, the proper areas for fixed Institution . 3s. (id.) and gives useful information on the welding of and movable control surfaces, control surface An authoritative list of the terms and their various classes of material, ferrous and non- design and flutter prevention. Some interest­ meanings used in modern acoustical research. ferrous. ing examples of apparent instabilities are A necessity for anyone working on the reduction Inspectio n of Aircraft After Overhaul. By quoted. Inertia effects on the part s of a control of noise in aeroplanes. S. J. Norton. (Pitman. 3s. fid.) circuit may for example simulate instability of Guide for Flying Instructors. (The Guild A third, revised, edition of a book the two the aeroplane. The author advises a larger of Air Pilots and Air Navigators of the previous editions of which have already been dihedral than is common in British practice. British Empire. 5s. fid.) noticed in these columns. In his view this should never be less than One imagines that this guide will be essen­ Airplan e and Engine Maintenance for the 3 deg.; for a low wing tapered monoplane it tial for any pilot desiring to qualify as an Airplan e Mechanic. By D. J. Bremin and should be 6 deg. The chapter on "Dynamic instructor. It gives details of the requirements H. E. Burgess. (Pitman. 7s. fid.) Stability " contains a concise summary of the for all Flying Instructor's Certificates and then This American handbook on the maintenance classic stability theory. It gives approximate goes through the courses of instruction for flying of aeroplanes is for some reason reproduced in formula; for those derivatives which can be landplanes, seaplanes and autogiros, and con­ fascimile type instead of print, which gives it simplified. cludes with hints on instrument flying. an amateurish appearance and makes it difficult Chapter 9 gives useful data on parasite drag Meta l Castings. By H. L. Campbell. (Wiley t o read. The illustrations in particular are and in the succeeding four chapters are con­ and Chapman & Hall. 15s.) most unsatisfactorily reproduced. It is entirely sidered the engine and airscrew characteristics This is an American textbook on foundry American in outlook and language, but has and the calculation of performance proper, practice. It is designed to help students in the interest as giving details of construction and comprising speed, climb and ceiling. The data stud y of the materials and processes employed repair practice in the United States. are up-to-date and are presented as directly in the production of metal castings of all types. useful curves and formula;. A chapter on Riggin g and Airframes. By J. Campbell I t is, of course, primarily concerned with cast- "Special " performance problems includes take­ Corlett. (Pitman. 5s.) iron, but having dealt fully with this has off and landing. Why writers of aerodynamic chapters on the special problems of steel and An admirable little textbook for riggers, text-books should, as they usually do, call these the non-ferrous metals. describing the tools required, materials used in two inescapable operations "special," we have Wa r Over England. By Air-Commodore aeroplanes and different types of construction, never understood. L. E. O. Chariton. (Longmans, Green. 12s. 6d.) with excellent hints on assembly and truing up

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Apr 1, 1937

There are no references for this article.