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Some Books Recently Received

Some Books Recently Received 46 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERIN G February, 1935 Seaplane Design—Standard Engineering Symbols and Abbreviations—War According to Germany Seaplan e Design. By. William Nelson. Britis h Standard Engineering Symbols Generalleutnant Friedrich von Cochenhausen, (McGraw Hill. 21s.) and Abbreviations. B.S. Specification A.D. (Hanseatische Verlagsanstalt, Ham­ The writer of "Seaplane Design" is to be No . 560. (The British Standards Institu­ burg. 6.30 Marks.) congratulated on the industry and care with tion. 3s. 6d.) I n the first of the essays collected by which he has consulted the published literature I n this little volume of only 62 pages will Generalleutnant F. von Cochenhausen under on his subject. He gives a full account of be found a list of the symbols and abbreviations the title Wehrgedanken, General von Cochen­ most of the recent work, both experimental which the B.S.I. recommend for all th e common hausen goes back to Frederick the Great for the and theoretical, which has been done in the engineering terms. The list covers mathe­ inspiration of the whole work, the great United States and Germany. Unfortunately, matical and physical quantities in general use, monarch being quoted as saying that passive he has not taken into account the still more and also a large number of materials and types waiting must inevitably lead to the destruction recent work published in this country, possibly of apparatus. Uniformity of practice in this an d division of the Prussian State. because his book was prepared some time ago. matte r would, without doubt, be a help to all Passive waiting, then, is not the attitude Research work on seaplanes, both model and concerned and could never be achieved without for the present moment; in its stead there full scale, is advancing so rapidly that in some an authentic pronouncement by a body like the must be the will for action: Germany must respects a book on seaplane design is almost B.S.I. assert herself. To this end the right spirit out-of-date before it is published. must be created in every one of her citizens, A point of stylistic importance in forming and this th e essay endeavours t o do by its special The field covered is extensive. More than abbreviations is the use of capital and small appeal. The spirit of 1914 is recalled; the half the book deals with the water qualities of letters. In their Explanatory Note at the spirit which is to inspire the New Defence seaplanes, which are very thoroughly treated. beginning, the B.S.I. state that the use of There is a chapter on weights and useful loads, Force for which Germany is now ready, is capitals has been discouraged, and that capitals outlined ; it must be a volunteer Force, led three chapters on constructional methods, and have been used for proper names and where it by a nucleus of professionals, to which every a chapter on mooring, towing and beaching. is the general practice to use capitals. In our German youth must feel it his duty to belong. The book concludes with some sketches of view the practice is far too general and should Then comes a warning: to be of good will modern amphibians, flying boats and float be discouraged more firmly than it is here. is not sufficient. An enlightened good will seaplanes. Wh y write B.M. for bending moment but m. is necessary, and the manner in which this of i., for moment of inertia ? Why does a The writer has a clear, concise and stimulat­ willingness to serve can best be used required ship have a C.G., but everything else a e.g.? ing style, and his knowledge of the water thought and study. The sound principle is that the same size of qualities of seaplanes is wide. His knowledge letter should be used in the abbreviation as The second and third parts of the book aim of aerodynamics is evidently not so complete, would be used for initial letters if the term a t imparting knowledge, the second part and the principle he occasionally adopts of were written in full. This principle might dealing with such things as the decision for treating the aerodynamic and hydrodynamic have been enunciated and applied more con­ properties separately is open to objection. war, the intelligence service in moder n warfare, sistently and less respect shown for general Some discussion of the effect of wind forces naval warfare and the importance of sea-power usage. Following this principle, the two on lateral stability on the water, a problem in in the fate of nations, the development of systems of units, Centimetre Gramme Second which aerodynamic and hydrodynamic forces chemical warfare; whilst in the third part and Foot Pound Second should be abbreviated both play an important part, would have been various forms of national defence systems are to C.G.S. and F.P.S., instead of c.g.s. and analysed : the Dandwehr of 1813, the N. welcome. Another important omission is the f.p.s. as now. This would avoid the present American Army in the War of Secession, the absence of any treatment of porpoising. difficulty that f.p.s. is also used for feet per Militia of Switzerland, the Russian Defence Although our knowledge about porpoising is second. organisation. Thus the education of the not extensive, a good deal more might be said tha n the few sentences given in the book. German youth is widened to take in things The majority of the symbols selected are old from abroad. Unfortunately, there are a number of state­ friends and few will object to being asked to ments which are either not proven or are use them. In some cases alternatives are One of the most important chapters is an examination of the position in regard to demonstrably incorrect. On page 53 the given. Either w or W may be used for weight Chemical Warfare. writer implies tha t when a seaplane is planing, (p. 6). W is preferable as w is used for load the elevator control is always sufficient to give per unit area (p. 26), and is also (though not in stability. This is contrary to experience. this specification) extensively used for load Th e Airman's Year Book, 1934-35. (Pitman. 3s. 6d.) On page 55 he states that hulls with pointed per unit length. We think the printer must If "airman" be translated "aeroplane main steps have lower resistances at high be responsible for putting v for the coefficient speeds than conventional hulls. There is no of kinematic viscostity in place of the univers­ pilot " this book is exactly what the title would published evidence supporting this. The hulls ally used Τ. For the coefficient of viscosity (μ. lead one to believe. It contains most of the with pointed steps which have been tested in is preferable to Η a s the latter is always used for information he needs as to Customs require­ the United States have flatter bottoms than efficiency. The term "ratio of slenderness" ments, meteorological services and British and conventional British hulls and direct com­ is applied (p. 26) to both l/d and l/k. The International flying regulations. It also con­ parisons are, therefore, not admissible. On latte r is more general and usual. The symbol tains records of flying contests and a table page 63 there is a statement that steps in side f is used both for modulus of rupture (p. 11), of th e international markings. floats are not warranted. This is contrary and limiting stress (p. 12). These are not to the experience of British designers. The necessarily the same, and as both quantities TH E WRIGH T AN D MANLEY MEDALS value of 70 per cent for reserve buoyancy for a are stresses, a suffix notation on p would be Readers will be interested to learn that single float given on the same page is much clearer. The use of a space instead of a comma Messrs. R. B . Beisel, A. L. MacClain and F. M. less than would be considered sufficient for for separating groups of three digits is an Thomas, were on January 17 presented with seaworthiness. On page 68 there is a statement innovation though not an undesirable one. the Wright and Manley Memorial Medals a t a which appears to imply that the drag of a The comma is used on the Continent in place meeting of the Society of Automotive Engi­ float undercarriage is generally less than that of a decimal point and present British practice neers in acknowledgment of the outstanding of a wheel undercarriage. The reverse is must occasionally cause confusion. technical character of their joint paper on generally true. On page 69, however, the "Th e Cowling an d Cooling of Aircraft Engines." The small size of this volume conveys no statemen t appears to be contradicted. Such I t will be remembered that this paper was idea of the immense amount of work that must misleading statements could be multiplied. published in full in the issues of AIRCRAFT have gone to its preparation. The compilers ENGINEERIN G for June and July, 1934. I n spite of all its faults, however, the book deserve the cordial thanks of all students and has so much of value in it that it should be writers on engineering subjects for providing The Wright medal is for outstanding work read by everyone interested in the technical so useful a guide and work of reference. in aeroplane design or research and the Manley problem of seaplane design. The reader must H . B. H. medal for similar work in connection with aero­ be prepared, however, to be critical and not to engines. This is the first occasion on which accept without question all the opinions bot h medals have been awarded for the same Wehrgedanken . A Collection of Essays expressed. H.M.G. paper. concerning Defence Politics. Edited by http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

Some Books Recently Received

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology , Volume 7 (2): 1 – Feb 1, 1935

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Emerald Publishing
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0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb029905
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Abstract

46 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERIN G February, 1935 Seaplane Design—Standard Engineering Symbols and Abbreviations—War According to Germany Seaplan e Design. By. William Nelson. Britis h Standard Engineering Symbols Generalleutnant Friedrich von Cochenhausen, (McGraw Hill. 21s.) and Abbreviations. B.S. Specification A.D. (Hanseatische Verlagsanstalt, Ham­ The writer of "Seaplane Design" is to be No . 560. (The British Standards Institu­ burg. 6.30 Marks.) congratulated on the industry and care with tion. 3s. 6d.) I n the first of the essays collected by which he has consulted the published literature I n this little volume of only 62 pages will Generalleutnant F. von Cochenhausen under on his subject. He gives a full account of be found a list of the symbols and abbreviations the title Wehrgedanken, General von Cochen­ most of the recent work, both experimental which the B.S.I. recommend for all th e common hausen goes back to Frederick the Great for the and theoretical, which has been done in the engineering terms. The list covers mathe­ inspiration of the whole work, the great United States and Germany. Unfortunately, matical and physical quantities in general use, monarch being quoted as saying that passive he has not taken into account the still more and also a large number of materials and types waiting must inevitably lead to the destruction recent work published in this country, possibly of apparatus. Uniformity of practice in this an d division of the Prussian State. because his book was prepared some time ago. matte r would, without doubt, be a help to all Passive waiting, then, is not the attitude Research work on seaplanes, both model and concerned and could never be achieved without for the present moment; in its stead there full scale, is advancing so rapidly that in some an authentic pronouncement by a body like the must be the will for action: Germany must respects a book on seaplane design is almost B.S.I. assert herself. To this end the right spirit out-of-date before it is published. must be created in every one of her citizens, A point of stylistic importance in forming and this th e essay endeavours t o do by its special The field covered is extensive. More than abbreviations is the use of capital and small appeal. The spirit of 1914 is recalled; the half the book deals with the water qualities of letters. In their Explanatory Note at the spirit which is to inspire the New Defence seaplanes, which are very thoroughly treated. beginning, the B.S.I. state that the use of There is a chapter on weights and useful loads, Force for which Germany is now ready, is capitals has been discouraged, and that capitals outlined ; it must be a volunteer Force, led three chapters on constructional methods, and have been used for proper names and where it by a nucleus of professionals, to which every a chapter on mooring, towing and beaching. is the general practice to use capitals. In our German youth must feel it his duty to belong. The book concludes with some sketches of view the practice is far too general and should Then comes a warning: to be of good will modern amphibians, flying boats and float be discouraged more firmly than it is here. is not sufficient. An enlightened good will seaplanes. Wh y write B.M. for bending moment but m. is necessary, and the manner in which this of i., for moment of inertia ? Why does a The writer has a clear, concise and stimulat­ willingness to serve can best be used required ship have a C.G., but everything else a e.g.? ing style, and his knowledge of the water thought and study. The sound principle is that the same size of qualities of seaplanes is wide. His knowledge letter should be used in the abbreviation as The second and third parts of the book aim of aerodynamics is evidently not so complete, would be used for initial letters if the term a t imparting knowledge, the second part and the principle he occasionally adopts of were written in full. This principle might dealing with such things as the decision for treating the aerodynamic and hydrodynamic have been enunciated and applied more con­ properties separately is open to objection. war, the intelligence service in moder n warfare, sistently and less respect shown for general Some discussion of the effect of wind forces naval warfare and the importance of sea-power usage. Following this principle, the two on lateral stability on the water, a problem in in the fate of nations, the development of systems of units, Centimetre Gramme Second which aerodynamic and hydrodynamic forces chemical warfare; whilst in the third part and Foot Pound Second should be abbreviated both play an important part, would have been various forms of national defence systems are to C.G.S. and F.P.S., instead of c.g.s. and analysed : the Dandwehr of 1813, the N. welcome. Another important omission is the f.p.s. as now. This would avoid the present American Army in the War of Secession, the absence of any treatment of porpoising. difficulty that f.p.s. is also used for feet per Militia of Switzerland, the Russian Defence Although our knowledge about porpoising is second. organisation. Thus the education of the not extensive, a good deal more might be said tha n the few sentences given in the book. German youth is widened to take in things The majority of the symbols selected are old from abroad. Unfortunately, there are a number of state­ friends and few will object to being asked to ments which are either not proven or are use them. In some cases alternatives are One of the most important chapters is an examination of the position in regard to demonstrably incorrect. On page 53 the given. Either w or W may be used for weight Chemical Warfare. writer implies tha t when a seaplane is planing, (p. 6). W is preferable as w is used for load the elevator control is always sufficient to give per unit area (p. 26), and is also (though not in stability. This is contrary to experience. this specification) extensively used for load Th e Airman's Year Book, 1934-35. (Pitman. 3s. 6d.) On page 55 he states that hulls with pointed per unit length. We think the printer must If "airman" be translated "aeroplane main steps have lower resistances at high be responsible for putting v for the coefficient speeds than conventional hulls. There is no of kinematic viscostity in place of the univers­ pilot " this book is exactly what the title would published evidence supporting this. The hulls ally used Τ. For the coefficient of viscosity (μ. lead one to believe. It contains most of the with pointed steps which have been tested in is preferable to Η a s the latter is always used for information he needs as to Customs require­ the United States have flatter bottoms than efficiency. The term "ratio of slenderness" ments, meteorological services and British and conventional British hulls and direct com­ is applied (p. 26) to both l/d and l/k. The International flying regulations. It also con­ parisons are, therefore, not admissible. On latte r is more general and usual. The symbol tains records of flying contests and a table page 63 there is a statement that steps in side f is used both for modulus of rupture (p. 11), of th e international markings. floats are not warranted. This is contrary and limiting stress (p. 12). These are not to the experience of British designers. The necessarily the same, and as both quantities TH E WRIGH T AN D MANLEY MEDALS value of 70 per cent for reserve buoyancy for a are stresses, a suffix notation on p would be Readers will be interested to learn that single float given on the same page is much clearer. The use of a space instead of a comma Messrs. R. B . Beisel, A. L. MacClain and F. M. less than would be considered sufficient for for separating groups of three digits is an Thomas, were on January 17 presented with seaworthiness. On page 68 there is a statement innovation though not an undesirable one. the Wright and Manley Memorial Medals a t a which appears to imply that the drag of a The comma is used on the Continent in place meeting of the Society of Automotive Engi­ float undercarriage is generally less than that of a decimal point and present British practice neers in acknowledgment of the outstanding of a wheel undercarriage. The reverse is must occasionally cause confusion. technical character of their joint paper on generally true. On page 69, however, the "Th e Cowling an d Cooling of Aircraft Engines." The small size of this volume conveys no statemen t appears to be contradicted. Such I t will be remembered that this paper was idea of the immense amount of work that must misleading statements could be multiplied. published in full in the issues of AIRCRAFT have gone to its preparation. The compilers ENGINEERIN G for June and July, 1934. I n spite of all its faults, however, the book deserve the cordial thanks of all students and has so much of value in it that it should be writers on engineering subjects for providing The Wright medal is for outstanding work read by everyone interested in the technical so useful a guide and work of reference. in aeroplane design or research and the Manley problem of seaplane design. The reader must H . B. H. medal for similar work in connection with aero­ be prepared, however, to be critical and not to engines. This is the first occasion on which accept without question all the opinions bot h medals have been awarded for the same Wehrgedanken . A Collection of Essays expressed. H.M.G. paper. concerning Defence Politics. Edited by

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Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Feb 1, 1935

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