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Some Books Recently Received

Some Books Recently Received November , 1939 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERIN G 421 A Two-Volume Work on Aerodynamics and Aero-Structures Aircraf t Design. Vol. I, Aerodynamics. the student is not given a clear method of One has no criticism of the description of the Vol. II , Aerostructures . By C. II . Latimer estimating the static longitudinal stability. weight distribution and centre of gravity Rathe r than mention the other less calculable Needham. (Chapman and Hall. 13.s. 6d. estimation, except that although the equivalent stabilities it might have been better to have and 16s.) plane of a biplane is carefully explained, the made static longitudinal stability absolutely student is left in the air when dealing with a The first volume is aerodynamics in words of clear. tapered monoplane. Apart from that the one syllable. It is not a book for those who really want to learn aerodynamic theory, but Chapter X, on variable lift devices is th e best chapter is good and impresses the student with for those who wish to become acquainted par t of the book as it gives quite a clear idea of th e importance of weight control. with the subject without too much trouble. the merits of slots and flaps. But here, too, Some indication should be given of the great This book can be understood with no more more graphs would have helped. fluidity of load factors and conditions of equipment than a little algebra. There is When writing about airscrews from the loading. The student must bo told how such certainly no harm in making aerodynamics performance point of view surely it would have factors are constantly being altered as a result readable and interesting, but, owing to the fact been simpler, and more in keeping with current of the daily increase of knowledge. When tha t it docs not deal with theory and covers knowledge, to have dealt mainly with the factors are laid down in a book like this without much that is not amenable to theoretical treat­ metal-bladed constant-speed type, and to have a warning, the uninformed might think that ment, the title " Aerodynamics " is not a correct considered the fixed-pitch type as a special they could be worked to, only to find out too one. Perhaps " Flight Mechanics " would case, instead of the other way round as in this late that in the meantime A P 1208 or A P 970 have been better. and so many other books. Apart from the has been altered. The inclusion of anything The book begins, as it must, with a few neglect of the constant-speed airscrew the (even paraphrased) from AP 1208 or A P 970 is performance chapter is very good. It is simple general principles and then goes on to air flow surely unnecessary, for any serious student and there are not too many long formula;. and streamlines. Now the reviewer must be a would have both of these. Space could then There is no attemp t to over-approximate, which critic, but in pointing out all the faults and be devoted to elucidation and extension of usually results in expressions which arc omissions, he does not wish to damn the book, these publications on the assumption that the dangerous for novices to use. Also the modern reader has them before him. but only to warn and to hope for a better analytical-statistical methods are omitted, second edition. The first thing that struck the The chapter called Structure Loads has too reviewer was a statement that the turbulence which is a good thing, as they would tend to much biplane and not enough monoplane in it. of large tunnels is of the order of tha t of the free confuse students. Take-off estimation is not The chapter called Wing Design is really just a mentioned. Since many modern machines are atmosphere. Surely there are only two or worked example of a parasol wing. Some of practically designed around the take-off, such three tunnels in existence whose turbulence is these short chapters could be combined with an omission should be made good in a future as small as that of the free air, and they are advantage. edition. very special indeed. In undercarriage design, only rubber in The author deals very clearly and logically The chapter on parasite drag is not very tension and compression are dealt with as shock with the development of the aerofoil shape impressive. The newer available data could absorbers, and curiously enough only a cross- from that of a flat plate. The business of have been far better digested and presented. axle undercarriage and a split type are taken explaining the circulation theory of lift in the I n addition the newer " skin friction " method as examples. No mention is made of the fact required words of one syllabic is very difficult. of drag analysis is only given two pages and tha t almost all new non-retractable landing The concept of circulation is really a mathe­ there it is only the rather sketchy original gear is of the single strut cantilever type. matical convenience and to state, as is done in method of Jones. In ten years th e method has A short chapter (13 pages) is given on metal this book, " tha t such a rotational flow com­ greatly developed until it is now, in refined construction. The information on stressed ponent does actually take place" is rather forms, in use for practically all new designs in skin construction is really insufficient, in view misleading. this country. The ducted cooling of engines of the fact that such construction is nowadays is dealt with but poorly. generally used on all but small types. The The chapter on the properties of aerofoils is chapters on floats, flying boats and experi­ quite clearly written as a whole, although it is I t is unfortunate, too, that the half-tone necessary to point out some gaps and other illustrations are not more closely connected mental testing could have been omitted and points. To give the characteristics of Raf 15 with the text. more space given to metal construction. as those of a well-known aerofoil is manifestly One cannot whole-heartedly recommend this Nearly all the full-page illustrations, both absurd as that section is long out of date. book because the student may be misled by photographs and drawings, are mere decoration, Induced drag coefficients arc given for various lack of clarity and by omissions. However, if being insufficiently connected with the text. aspect ratios and lift coefficients, without th e faults could be remedied in a second I n conclusion, the reviewer does feel that if malting it clear that the values are those for edition, the book could become an invaluable the books could be re-named "Light Aeroplane elliptical distribution only. aid to students. Design " and no attemp t made to cover a great The next chapter is on variations of aerofoil The second volume is unfortunately rather deal of other matter in a sketchy form, it would shape in which camber, thickness and external woolly. In detail it is for the most part correct, be a great improvement. curvature are dealt with at length. There is no but as a whole it is not sharply or clearly graph showing the effect of thickness on drag, expressed or arranged. Commen t devoir Mécanicien Militaire d'Avia- which is a pity, as such points are far more As in Vol. 1, there are a number of small tion. 56 pages, illustrated. (Les Ailes. 7.50 fr.) clearly expressible by a graph than otherwise. points which must be criticized for the good of La T.S.F. et l'apparelllagc électrique spécial The last two paragraphs of this chapter all concerned. In Chapter I for instance, a à bord des Avions modernes. By Henry (Chapter V) appear to the reviewer to bo mis­ biplane-monoplane comparison is made using Lanoy. 157 pages, illustrated. (Librairie des leading if not wrong. The whole point about a biplane and monoplane built some years ago. Sciences Pratiques Desforges. 48 fr.) the variation of aerofoil drag with Reynold's The date is not given, neither machine is Aerodromes , Their Location, Operation and number is that it varies with roughness for a pictured and, unless one happened to know that Design. Edited by Prof. Carl Pirath. In English, 120 pages, illustrated. (Sir Isaac given section, and roughness is not mentioned the monoplane described would to-day be Pitman & Sons, Ltd. 10s. fid.) here at all. When discussing plan form, the considered impossibly bad, quite a false Hell in the Heavens. By A. G J. Whitehouse. vital graph, that of variation of induced drag impression would be received from the com­ 262 pages, illustrated. (W. & R. Chambers, with taper and aspect ratio (compared with parison. In Chapter II, under the heading Ltd. 6s.) elliptical) is omitted and no real indication of General Layout, one cannot well agree with the Report on The Progress of Civil Aviation, this variation is given even in words. In statement that 40 per cent is a representative 1938. 103 pages. (His Majesty's Stationery dealing with biplane effects one of the main structure weight for modern multi-engined Office. 2s. 6d.) points is again lost, for in the induced drag flying boats. One would also think that Bibliography of Vibration and Flutter of Air­ expression given for biplanes there is no working out wing area by applying the Everling craft Wings and Control Surfaces. Compiled obvious way of comparing the biplane and the high speed figure would be a dangerous and under the direction of Alexander Klemin. monoplane. Some way of showing the effective roundabout procedure for students. A biplane (Works Progress Administration Publication. aspect ratio of a biplane cellule or th e equivalent wing weight formula (Farren's) is given, but no Copies by request from Dr. A. Klemin, Daniel monoplane span would have added perspective. formula for monoplane wing weight—of which Guggenheim School of Aeronautics. New York several expressions are available. University.) The chapter on stability is disappointing, for http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

Some Books Recently Received

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology , Volume 11 (11): 1 – Nov 1, 1939

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb030569
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Abstract

November , 1939 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERIN G 421 A Two-Volume Work on Aerodynamics and Aero-Structures Aircraf t Design. Vol. I, Aerodynamics. the student is not given a clear method of One has no criticism of the description of the Vol. II , Aerostructures . By C. II . Latimer estimating the static longitudinal stability. weight distribution and centre of gravity Rathe r than mention the other less calculable Needham. (Chapman and Hall. 13.s. 6d. estimation, except that although the equivalent stabilities it might have been better to have and 16s.) plane of a biplane is carefully explained, the made static longitudinal stability absolutely student is left in the air when dealing with a The first volume is aerodynamics in words of clear. tapered monoplane. Apart from that the one syllable. It is not a book for those who really want to learn aerodynamic theory, but Chapter X, on variable lift devices is th e best chapter is good and impresses the student with for those who wish to become acquainted par t of the book as it gives quite a clear idea of th e importance of weight control. with the subject without too much trouble. the merits of slots and flaps. But here, too, Some indication should be given of the great This book can be understood with no more more graphs would have helped. fluidity of load factors and conditions of equipment than a little algebra. There is When writing about airscrews from the loading. The student must bo told how such certainly no harm in making aerodynamics performance point of view surely it would have factors are constantly being altered as a result readable and interesting, but, owing to the fact been simpler, and more in keeping with current of the daily increase of knowledge. When tha t it docs not deal with theory and covers knowledge, to have dealt mainly with the factors are laid down in a book like this without much that is not amenable to theoretical treat­ metal-bladed constant-speed type, and to have a warning, the uninformed might think that ment, the title " Aerodynamics " is not a correct considered the fixed-pitch type as a special they could be worked to, only to find out too one. Perhaps " Flight Mechanics " would case, instead of the other way round as in this late that in the meantime A P 1208 or A P 970 have been better. and so many other books. Apart from the has been altered. The inclusion of anything The book begins, as it must, with a few neglect of the constant-speed airscrew the (even paraphrased) from AP 1208 or A P 970 is performance chapter is very good. It is simple general principles and then goes on to air flow surely unnecessary, for any serious student and there are not too many long formula;. and streamlines. Now the reviewer must be a would have both of these. Space could then There is no attemp t to over-approximate, which critic, but in pointing out all the faults and be devoted to elucidation and extension of usually results in expressions which arc omissions, he does not wish to damn the book, these publications on the assumption that the dangerous for novices to use. Also the modern reader has them before him. but only to warn and to hope for a better analytical-statistical methods are omitted, second edition. The first thing that struck the The chapter called Structure Loads has too reviewer was a statement that the turbulence which is a good thing, as they would tend to much biplane and not enough monoplane in it. of large tunnels is of the order of tha t of the free confuse students. Take-off estimation is not The chapter called Wing Design is really just a mentioned. Since many modern machines are atmosphere. Surely there are only two or worked example of a parasol wing. Some of practically designed around the take-off, such three tunnels in existence whose turbulence is these short chapters could be combined with an omission should be made good in a future as small as that of the free air, and they are advantage. edition. very special indeed. In undercarriage design, only rubber in The author deals very clearly and logically The chapter on parasite drag is not very tension and compression are dealt with as shock with the development of the aerofoil shape impressive. The newer available data could absorbers, and curiously enough only a cross- from that of a flat plate. The business of have been far better digested and presented. axle undercarriage and a split type are taken explaining the circulation theory of lift in the I n addition the newer " skin friction " method as examples. No mention is made of the fact required words of one syllabic is very difficult. of drag analysis is only given two pages and tha t almost all new non-retractable landing The concept of circulation is really a mathe­ there it is only the rather sketchy original gear is of the single strut cantilever type. matical convenience and to state, as is done in method of Jones. In ten years th e method has A short chapter (13 pages) is given on metal this book, " tha t such a rotational flow com­ greatly developed until it is now, in refined construction. The information on stressed ponent does actually take place" is rather forms, in use for practically all new designs in skin construction is really insufficient, in view misleading. this country. The ducted cooling of engines of the fact that such construction is nowadays is dealt with but poorly. generally used on all but small types. The The chapter on the properties of aerofoils is chapters on floats, flying boats and experi­ quite clearly written as a whole, although it is I t is unfortunate, too, that the half-tone necessary to point out some gaps and other illustrations are not more closely connected mental testing could have been omitted and points. To give the characteristics of Raf 15 with the text. more space given to metal construction. as those of a well-known aerofoil is manifestly One cannot whole-heartedly recommend this Nearly all the full-page illustrations, both absurd as that section is long out of date. book because the student may be misled by photographs and drawings, are mere decoration, Induced drag coefficients arc given for various lack of clarity and by omissions. However, if being insufficiently connected with the text. aspect ratios and lift coefficients, without th e faults could be remedied in a second I n conclusion, the reviewer does feel that if malting it clear that the values are those for edition, the book could become an invaluable the books could be re-named "Light Aeroplane elliptical distribution only. aid to students. Design " and no attemp t made to cover a great The next chapter is on variations of aerofoil The second volume is unfortunately rather deal of other matter in a sketchy form, it would shape in which camber, thickness and external woolly. In detail it is for the most part correct, be a great improvement. curvature are dealt with at length. There is no but as a whole it is not sharply or clearly graph showing the effect of thickness on drag, expressed or arranged. Commen t devoir Mécanicien Militaire d'Avia- which is a pity, as such points are far more As in Vol. 1, there are a number of small tion. 56 pages, illustrated. (Les Ailes. 7.50 fr.) clearly expressible by a graph than otherwise. points which must be criticized for the good of La T.S.F. et l'apparelllagc électrique spécial The last two paragraphs of this chapter all concerned. In Chapter I for instance, a à bord des Avions modernes. By Henry (Chapter V) appear to the reviewer to bo mis­ biplane-monoplane comparison is made using Lanoy. 157 pages, illustrated. (Librairie des leading if not wrong. The whole point about a biplane and monoplane built some years ago. Sciences Pratiques Desforges. 48 fr.) the variation of aerofoil drag with Reynold's The date is not given, neither machine is Aerodromes , Their Location, Operation and number is that it varies with roughness for a pictured and, unless one happened to know that Design. Edited by Prof. Carl Pirath. In English, 120 pages, illustrated. (Sir Isaac given section, and roughness is not mentioned the monoplane described would to-day be Pitman & Sons, Ltd. 10s. fid.) here at all. When discussing plan form, the considered impossibly bad, quite a false Hell in the Heavens. By A. G J. Whitehouse. vital graph, that of variation of induced drag impression would be received from the com­ 262 pages, illustrated. (W. & R. Chambers, with taper and aspect ratio (compared with parison. In Chapter II, under the heading Ltd. 6s.) elliptical) is omitted and no real indication of General Layout, one cannot well agree with the Report on The Progress of Civil Aviation, this variation is given even in words. In statement that 40 per cent is a representative 1938. 103 pages. (His Majesty's Stationery dealing with biplane effects one of the main structure weight for modern multi-engined Office. 2s. 6d.) points is again lost, for in the induced drag flying boats. One would also think that Bibliography of Vibration and Flutter of Air­ expression given for biplanes there is no working out wing area by applying the Everling craft Wings and Control Surfaces. Compiled obvious way of comparing the biplane and the high speed figure would be a dangerous and under the direction of Alexander Klemin. monoplane. Some way of showing the effective roundabout procedure for students. A biplane (Works Progress Administration Publication. aspect ratio of a biplane cellule or th e equivalent wing weight formula (Farren's) is given, but no Copies by request from Dr. A. Klemin, Daniel monoplane span would have added perspective. formula for monoplane wing weight—of which Guggenheim School of Aeronautics. New York several expressions are available. University.) The chapter on stability is disappointing, for

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Nov 1, 1939

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