Some Books Recently Received

Some Books Recently Received 240 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERIN G September, 1937 Anothe r Edition of "Th e Care and Maintenance of Aircraft " and Books on a Variety of Subjects Ai r Transportation Costing. By Captain Th e Care and Maintenance of Aircraft. Th e " Aeroplane " Directory of the N. T. Macleod. (Pitman. 7s. 6d.) Fifth Edition, Various Authors. (Bunhill Aviation and Allied Industries. (Temple At first sight this book might appear to be Publications, Ltd. 5s.) Press. 10s. 6d.) outside the field of the aeroplane engineer and I t is most gratifying to be able to announce This is the second edition ; with slightly designer. But on examination it will be found th e appearance of yet another edition of this modified title indicating a change of ownership, to provide much food for thought. After all, book, called for by the continued demand, of the Planes Directory published two years it is possible for the designer to influence the which has now extended over seven years. ago. In the list of publications the price is running, and more particularly the mainten­ Each successive edition has had a new chapter given as 15s., but wc have selected that ance, costs of his product . If he knows, as this added so tha t these have grown in number from stamped on the cover, which is presumably book tells him, " where the money goes " he th e fourteen of th e original edition of 1930 t o correct. The book is divided into seven can design for economic efficiency. nineteen in thi s new edition. The chapte r now sections : I—Manufacturers and Suppliers in added deals with the inspection and care of Great Britain, II—Classified Trades, III— Aer o Engineering. In 32 Weekly Parts. electrical equipment and covers the require­ Brand and Trade Names, IV—Controlling (Newnes. 1s. per part.) ments in this respect of th e X Licence. It is Bodies, Associations, Clubs and Schools, V— We have received Parts 1 an d 2 of thi s serial not proposed again to publish a formal review Aerodromes in Great Britain, VI—Private publication. It is intended to give those of its contents, which are by now familiar to Aircraft Owners and Transport Operators in coming into the aircraft industry under the all those interested. Its stead y continuing sale Great Britain, VII—Overseas and Foreign, with present expansion scheme an insight into the is its best recommendation. It is used as the a section of " Useful Information." methods of construction and production and standar d text book by most of the schools of The first three sections appear to be very practice in regard to maintenanc e and overhaul. instruction for ground engineers and may be exhaustive and as nearly complete as it is Though it is designed to cover the civil as well said to be the " bible " of members of that humanly possible t o get them , though there are as th e military side of aviation—articles on th e profession. omissions we have noticed, particularly among maintenance and running of th e Gipsy " Major " th e brands and trade names. It would have engine are included in these two parts—there been better, surely, to mention Miles' aircraft is a strong military bias in mos t of th e chapters. Interpretiv e History of Flight . By M. J . B . instead of listing " Hawk " and " Sparrow- The majority of the authors appear to be Air Davy. (H.M. Stationery Office. 5s.) hawk " separately. Including the names of Ministry officials whose knowledge and experi­ No one is better qualified than Mr. Davy individual machines in such a list is not ence are mainly on the military side. The of the Science Museum to write this book. It altogether satisfactory. It tends to " date " chapter on Inspectio n of Airframes, for example, is an attemp t to assess the relative importance very quickly and it is probably beyond the appears to be written from a Service point of of the various suggestions, researches and limits of human fallibility to be fully com­ view. With this reservation, it can be recom­ experiments made all down tne ages towards prehensive. We miss, for instance, " Hawk mended to engineers wishing to acquire the th e achievement of flight. Progress is dealt Moth," " Puss Moth " and " Demon," to rudiments of knowledge on their new work. with chronologically and illuminated by com­ mention but three. An alphabetical list of ment s on th e place of th e work of each investi­ trad e names such as this brings out strikingly Smal l Four-Stroke Engines. By C. F. gator and its effect and importance in relation th e popularity of certain words for use in this Caunter. (Pitman. 6s.) t o later development. We envy Mr. Davy the way—e.g., " Atlas " and " Lion." " Hercules " Mr. Caunter is, of course, best known as an opportunity his work has given him for this has two entries, neither of which refers to th e advocate of the two-stroke cycle, so he here study in comparativ e history. It is a fascinating new Bristol engine. appears to some extent in a new guise. The subject which has lost nothing in his treatmen t general design of small aero-engines is covered of it. The book raises many interesting queries, and then each of the existing types described. not all of which ar e answered. Who, for example, Constructio n of Woode n Aircraft. By S. F . Most of these are familiar, but there are a few was the first to use a wind tunnel for aero­ Wilkinson. (Pitman. 10s. 6d.) tha t are new and none that have any claim to nautical research ? We incline to the view A complete guide to the construction and be included seem to be omitted. An interest­ that, in England at an y rate, it was Wenham, assembly of the various component parts of a ing and useful book for th e owner of a really light who, we believe, writing from recollection, built wooden aeroplane—fuselage, tail unit, under­ aeroplane. a wind-tunnel with a grant from the Aero­ carriage and wings. It is profusely illustrated nautical Society. This is not mentioned by with working drawings, the reading of which is Th e Modern Diesel. (Iliffe. 3s. 6d.) Mr. Davy who appears to mention the wind- facilitated by the wisely large page size on A fourth edition of a popular handbook tunnel first in connexion with Horatio Phillips. which they are printed . We do no t remember previously reviewed in AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING. I t would be ungracious to cavil at any of seeing a book on these lines before and it Mr. Davy's appraisements. It is sufficient certainly should have a wide circulation. It Patent s for Inventions. By R. Haddan. t o thank him for a book which many of us would be invaluable to anyone embarking on (Pitman. 3s. 6d.) would have liked, but lacked the courage or th e wooden aeroplane construction. A pocket guide to the English law for industry, to write. We promise him tha t one inventors and patentees. copy at an y rat e will be well thumbed and will delight many hours of leisure. Meta l Aircraft Construction. Third Wing s Across Continents. By E. Rusman. Edition. By S. P. Langley. (Pitman. (Andries Blitz, Amsterdam. No price 15s.) stated.) Britis h Standard Specification No. 563 - This new edition has been enlarged from 338 This is a guide for the traveller on the 1937 for Land Aerodrome and Airway to 364 pages and a good deal of new information K.L.M. Amsterdam-Batavia air line. It gives Lighting . (British Standards Institution. is added. Practice in metal construction of brief historical notes on an d descriptions of th e 2s.) aeroplanes is changin g very rapidly, particularly various countries and towns passed over or with the growing adoption of stressed-skin This new edition supersedes the one origin­ visited and is lavishly illustrated with ground methods for main planes. The amount of ally issued in July, 1934. Among the defini­ and air photographs—some of the latter are tions the term " illuminated wind indicator " information Mr. Langley has managed to remarkably fine. has given place to two terms, " illuminated collect is most remarkable and he gives details landing direction indicator " and " illuminated of the practice of various firms all over the How , Why and When?—Aeroplanes. By wind velocity indicator." The three standard world—including Russia—which are, so far as R. Barnard Way. (Cassell. 3s. 6d.) colours are now aviation red, aviation green we know, in many instances to be found Th e Modern Book of Aeroplanes and Air ­ and aviation yellow (which has superseded the nowhere else. Wc cannot imagine any ships . By W H. McCormick. (A. & C. old aviation orange for obstructio n lights). The draughtsman engaged on the design of detail Black. 5s.) part s who would not find the book a help and distribution and luminous output of all types Two books for the young, the first illustrated t o the novice and the student it is invaluable. of light are closely laid down and graphs b y rather crude sketches and the second by provided for calculating the principle of The illustrations, with which it bristles, are photographs. Both deal with the subject spacing. alone worth the price of th e book. chiefly historically. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

Some Books Recently Received

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, Volume 9 (9): 1 – Sep 1, 1937

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb030221
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Abstract

240 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERIN G September, 1937 Anothe r Edition of "Th e Care and Maintenance of Aircraft " and Books on a Variety of Subjects Ai r Transportation Costing. By Captain Th e Care and Maintenance of Aircraft. Th e " Aeroplane " Directory of the N. T. Macleod. (Pitman. 7s. 6d.) Fifth Edition, Various Authors. (Bunhill Aviation and Allied Industries. (Temple At first sight this book might appear to be Publications, Ltd. 5s.) Press. 10s. 6d.) outside the field of the aeroplane engineer and I t is most gratifying to be able to announce This is the second edition ; with slightly designer. But on examination it will be found th e appearance of yet another edition of this modified title indicating a change of ownership, to provide much food for thought. After all, book, called for by the continued demand, of the Planes Directory published two years it is possible for the designer to influence the which has now extended over seven years. ago. In the list of publications the price is running, and more particularly the mainten­ Each successive edition has had a new chapter given as 15s., but wc have selected that ance, costs of his product . If he knows, as this added so tha t these have grown in number from stamped on the cover, which is presumably book tells him, " where the money goes " he th e fourteen of th e original edition of 1930 t o correct. The book is divided into seven can design for economic efficiency. nineteen in thi s new edition. The chapte r now sections : I—Manufacturers and Suppliers in added deals with the inspection and care of Great Britain, II—Classified Trades, III— Aer o Engineering. In 32 Weekly Parts. electrical equipment and covers the require­ Brand and Trade Names, IV—Controlling (Newnes. 1s. per part.) ments in this respect of th e X Licence. It is Bodies, Associations, Clubs and Schools, V— We have received Parts 1 an d 2 of thi s serial not proposed again to publish a formal review Aerodromes in Great Britain, VI—Private publication. It is intended to give those of its contents, which are by now familiar to Aircraft Owners and Transport Operators in coming into the aircraft industry under the all those interested. Its stead y continuing sale Great Britain, VII—Overseas and Foreign, with present expansion scheme an insight into the is its best recommendation. It is used as the a section of " Useful Information." methods of construction and production and standar d text book by most of the schools of The first three sections appear to be very practice in regard to maintenanc e and overhaul. instruction for ground engineers and may be exhaustive and as nearly complete as it is Though it is designed to cover the civil as well said to be the " bible " of members of that humanly possible t o get them , though there are as th e military side of aviation—articles on th e profession. omissions we have noticed, particularly among maintenance and running of th e Gipsy " Major " th e brands and trade names. It would have engine are included in these two parts—there been better, surely, to mention Miles' aircraft is a strong military bias in mos t of th e chapters. Interpretiv e History of Flight . By M. J . B . instead of listing " Hawk " and " Sparrow- The majority of the authors appear to be Air Davy. (H.M. Stationery Office. 5s.) hawk " separately. Including the names of Ministry officials whose knowledge and experi­ No one is better qualified than Mr. Davy individual machines in such a list is not ence are mainly on the military side. The of the Science Museum to write this book. It altogether satisfactory. It tends to " date " chapter on Inspectio n of Airframes, for example, is an attemp t to assess the relative importance very quickly and it is probably beyond the appears to be written from a Service point of of the various suggestions, researches and limits of human fallibility to be fully com­ view. With this reservation, it can be recom­ experiments made all down tne ages towards prehensive. We miss, for instance, " Hawk mended to engineers wishing to acquire the th e achievement of flight. Progress is dealt Moth," " Puss Moth " and " Demon," to rudiments of knowledge on their new work. with chronologically and illuminated by com­ mention but three. An alphabetical list of ment s on th e place of th e work of each investi­ trad e names such as this brings out strikingly Smal l Four-Stroke Engines. By C. F. gator and its effect and importance in relation th e popularity of certain words for use in this Caunter. (Pitman. 6s.) t o later development. We envy Mr. Davy the way—e.g., " Atlas " and " Lion." " Hercules " Mr. Caunter is, of course, best known as an opportunity his work has given him for this has two entries, neither of which refers to th e advocate of the two-stroke cycle, so he here study in comparativ e history. It is a fascinating new Bristol engine. appears to some extent in a new guise. The subject which has lost nothing in his treatmen t general design of small aero-engines is covered of it. The book raises many interesting queries, and then each of the existing types described. not all of which ar e answered. Who, for example, Constructio n of Woode n Aircraft. By S. F . Most of these are familiar, but there are a few was the first to use a wind tunnel for aero­ Wilkinson. (Pitman. 10s. 6d.) tha t are new and none that have any claim to nautical research ? We incline to the view A complete guide to the construction and be included seem to be omitted. An interest­ that, in England at an y rate, it was Wenham, assembly of the various component parts of a ing and useful book for th e owner of a really light who, we believe, writing from recollection, built wooden aeroplane—fuselage, tail unit, under­ aeroplane. a wind-tunnel with a grant from the Aero­ carriage and wings. It is profusely illustrated nautical Society. This is not mentioned by with working drawings, the reading of which is Th e Modern Diesel. (Iliffe. 3s. 6d.) Mr. Davy who appears to mention the wind- facilitated by the wisely large page size on A fourth edition of a popular handbook tunnel first in connexion with Horatio Phillips. which they are printed . We do no t remember previously reviewed in AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING. I t would be ungracious to cavil at any of seeing a book on these lines before and it Mr. Davy's appraisements. It is sufficient certainly should have a wide circulation. It Patent s for Inventions. By R. Haddan. t o thank him for a book which many of us would be invaluable to anyone embarking on (Pitman. 3s. 6d.) would have liked, but lacked the courage or th e wooden aeroplane construction. A pocket guide to the English law for industry, to write. We promise him tha t one inventors and patentees. copy at an y rat e will be well thumbed and will delight many hours of leisure. Meta l Aircraft Construction. Third Wing s Across Continents. By E. Rusman. Edition. By S. P. Langley. (Pitman. (Andries Blitz, Amsterdam. No price 15s.) stated.) Britis h Standard Specification No. 563 - This new edition has been enlarged from 338 This is a guide for the traveller on the 1937 for Land Aerodrome and Airway to 364 pages and a good deal of new information K.L.M. Amsterdam-Batavia air line. It gives Lighting . (British Standards Institution. is added. Practice in metal construction of brief historical notes on an d descriptions of th e 2s.) aeroplanes is changin g very rapidly, particularly various countries and towns passed over or with the growing adoption of stressed-skin This new edition supersedes the one origin­ visited and is lavishly illustrated with ground methods for main planes. The amount of ally issued in July, 1934. Among the defini­ and air photographs—some of the latter are tions the term " illuminated wind indicator " information Mr. Langley has managed to remarkably fine. has given place to two terms, " illuminated collect is most remarkable and he gives details landing direction indicator " and " illuminated of the practice of various firms all over the How , Why and When?—Aeroplanes. By wind velocity indicator." The three standard world—including Russia—which are, so far as R. Barnard Way. (Cassell. 3s. 6d.) colours are now aviation red, aviation green we know, in many instances to be found Th e Modern Book of Aeroplanes and Air ­ and aviation yellow (which has superseded the nowhere else. Wc cannot imagine any ships . By W H. McCormick. (A. & C. old aviation orange for obstructio n lights). The draughtsman engaged on the design of detail Black. 5s.) part s who would not find the book a help and distribution and luminous output of all types Two books for the young, the first illustrated t o the novice and the student it is invaluable. of light are closely laid down and graphs b y rather crude sketches and the second by provided for calculating the principle of The illustrations, with which it bristles, are photographs. Both deal with the subject spacing. alone worth the price of th e book. chiefly historically.

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Sep 1, 1937

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