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Solidarity, job satisfaction, and turnover intent in employees

Solidarity, job satisfaction, and turnover intent in employees While the role of solidarity in the workplace has been examined in previous research, it is still an important component of the workplace for Japanese employees. The purpose of this paper is to integrate findings on solidarity at the workplace, job satisfaction and intent to turnover. A moderated mediation model is hypothesized where solidarity predicts intent to turnover via job satisfaction, but the strength of this whole mediation process is moderated by employees’ length of working overtime or working long hours.Design/methodology/approachThe data analyzed in this study were acquired from the Japanese General Social Survey 2010, which was administered to 527 men and 278 women.FindingsThe results generally supported the assumptions; the proposed mediation model proved to be statistically significant, even when background covariates were introduced into the model to control for pre-existing differences. Also, the proposed moderated mediation model was supported; solidarity strongly increased job satisfaction when working overtime was low.Research limitations/implicationsBecause of measurement of solidarity, this study results may limit the generalizability. Researchers should explore the relationship between the dimension of solidarity and job satisfaction.Practical implicationsThe paper includes the implications for human resource management, the developing of solidarity at the workplace and for managing the strain of working overtime.Originality/valueThis study was the first to examine the relationship between solidarity at the workplace and job satisfaction and the moderating effects of working overtime. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Workplace Health Management Emerald Publishing

Solidarity, job satisfaction, and turnover intent in employees

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
© Emerald Publishing Limited
ISSN
1753-8351
DOI
10.1108/ijwhm-09-2018-0118
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

While the role of solidarity in the workplace has been examined in previous research, it is still an important component of the workplace for Japanese employees. The purpose of this paper is to integrate findings on solidarity at the workplace, job satisfaction and intent to turnover. A moderated mediation model is hypothesized where solidarity predicts intent to turnover via job satisfaction, but the strength of this whole mediation process is moderated by employees’ length of working overtime or working long hours.Design/methodology/approachThe data analyzed in this study were acquired from the Japanese General Social Survey 2010, which was administered to 527 men and 278 women.FindingsThe results generally supported the assumptions; the proposed mediation model proved to be statistically significant, even when background covariates were introduced into the model to control for pre-existing differences. Also, the proposed moderated mediation model was supported; solidarity strongly increased job satisfaction when working overtime was low.Research limitations/implicationsBecause of measurement of solidarity, this study results may limit the generalizability. Researchers should explore the relationship between the dimension of solidarity and job satisfaction.Practical implicationsThe paper includes the implications for human resource management, the developing of solidarity at the workplace and for managing the strain of working overtime.Originality/valueThis study was the first to examine the relationship between solidarity at the workplace and job satisfaction and the moderating effects of working overtime.

Journal

International Journal of Workplace Health ManagementEmerald Publishing

Published: Aug 13, 2019

Keywords: Job satisfaction; Working hours; Overwork; Intent to turnover; Solidarity at the workplace

References