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Social network knowledge construction: emerging virtual world pedagogy

Social network knowledge construction: emerging virtual world pedagogy Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to identify and explore the dynamics of an emerging form of teaching and learning – social network knowledge construction – associated with the use of social networks, particularly 3D virtual world environments such as Second Life. As social network technologies not only frame the way individuals interact and learn, but actually impact on a learner's thinking process and development of future consciousness, new pedagogies are needed to effectively integrate these communication mechanisms into the learning environment. Design/methodology/approach – The paper discusses the purpose and potential use of these networks in the teaching and learning process. Distinguishing features of social network knowledge construction as an emerging pedagogy are identified. Findings – Strategies for incorporating a variety of identified social networks, both in and out of virtual worlds, for teaching and learning are noted. Research limitations/implications – The focus of this emerging pedagogy is framed within the social networks surrounding Second Life, in particular, although the pedagogical framework could be applied across any set of social networking or virtual world applications. Practical implications – The paper provides critical information currently required by the early to mid‐adopters of social networks and virtual worlds for teaching and learning. Originality/value – This paper identifies an emerging form of pedagogy that has yet to be fully discussed in the literature, and supports the present issue's emphasis on future‐focused learning. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png On the Horizon Emerald Publishing

Social network knowledge construction: emerging virtual world pedagogy

On the Horizon , Volume 17 (2): 13 – May 15, 2009

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References (9)

Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1074-8121
DOI
10.1108/10748120910965494
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to identify and explore the dynamics of an emerging form of teaching and learning – social network knowledge construction – associated with the use of social networks, particularly 3D virtual world environments such as Second Life. As social network technologies not only frame the way individuals interact and learn, but actually impact on a learner's thinking process and development of future consciousness, new pedagogies are needed to effectively integrate these communication mechanisms into the learning environment. Design/methodology/approach – The paper discusses the purpose and potential use of these networks in the teaching and learning process. Distinguishing features of social network knowledge construction as an emerging pedagogy are identified. Findings – Strategies for incorporating a variety of identified social networks, both in and out of virtual worlds, for teaching and learning are noted. Research limitations/implications – The focus of this emerging pedagogy is framed within the social networks surrounding Second Life, in particular, although the pedagogical framework could be applied across any set of social networking or virtual world applications. Practical implications – The paper provides critical information currently required by the early to mid‐adopters of social networks and virtual worlds for teaching and learning. Originality/value – This paper identifies an emerging form of pedagogy that has yet to be fully discussed in the literature, and supports the present issue's emphasis on future‐focused learning.

Journal

On the HorizonEmerald Publishing

Published: May 15, 2009

Keywords: Social networks; Teaching; Epistemology; Social interaction; Learning

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