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Social capital and team performance

Social capital and team performance Purpose – This article attempts to contribute to the body of knowledge regarding the value of social networks, or social capital, within the group process towards group and team performance by exploring the explicit contribution of social capital towards a group or team's performance. Design/methodology/approach – The research views the potential contribution of social capital through the perspective of the resource‐based view of organizations, where social capital's unique potential contribution to the organization's competitive advantage is highlighted. Data were collected from undergraduate student‐athletes ( n =570) from 23 NCAA colleges and universities across the USA using a multiple hierarchical regression analysis. Findings – Results show a significant connection between social capital and team performance. This contribution is above and beyond other input and process variables, such as past team performance. Research limitations/implications – Data were limited to a cross‐sectional view of social capital and team performance. Results, however, support past theoretical models where social capital maintains a significant presence in overall group effectiveness. Originality/value – While social capital has been connected to team performance conceptually, few research studies have made this connection explicit. This article provides justification for maintaining social capital as a viable and ubiquitous element to the dynamic group process. Findings here also provide additional support for re‐examining social capital as significant contributor to a firm's competitive advantage. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Team Performance Management Emerald Publishing

Social capital and team performance

Team Performance Management , Volume 17 (7/8): 13 – Oct 18, 2011

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2011 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1352-7592
DOI
10.1108/13527591111182634
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – This article attempts to contribute to the body of knowledge regarding the value of social networks, or social capital, within the group process towards group and team performance by exploring the explicit contribution of social capital towards a group or team's performance. Design/methodology/approach – The research views the potential contribution of social capital through the perspective of the resource‐based view of organizations, where social capital's unique potential contribution to the organization's competitive advantage is highlighted. Data were collected from undergraduate student‐athletes ( n =570) from 23 NCAA colleges and universities across the USA using a multiple hierarchical regression analysis. Findings – Results show a significant connection between social capital and team performance. This contribution is above and beyond other input and process variables, such as past team performance. Research limitations/implications – Data were limited to a cross‐sectional view of social capital and team performance. Results, however, support past theoretical models where social capital maintains a significant presence in overall group effectiveness. Originality/value – While social capital has been connected to team performance conceptually, few research studies have made this connection explicit. This article provides justification for maintaining social capital as a viable and ubiquitous element to the dynamic group process. Findings here also provide additional support for re‐examining social capital as significant contributor to a firm's competitive advantage.

Journal

Team Performance ManagementEmerald Publishing

Published: Oct 18, 2011

Keywords: Social networks; Team working; Team performance; United States of America; Group dynamics

References