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Small-scale poultry enterprises in Kenyan medium-sized cities

Small-scale poultry enterprises in Kenyan medium-sized cities PurposeThe purpose of this paper is to investigate the profitability of urban chicken production in the medium-sized cities of Kisumu and Thika, Kenya.Design/methodology/approachData were collected in 2016 from a sample of 157 indigenous chicken producers in the two cities. Descriptive analyses were used to characterize indigenous chicken production, marketing and profitability. In addition, multivariate regression models were estimated to determine factors influencing profitability of the enterprise.FindingsUrban indigenous chicken production mainly serves a dual role of food provision and income generation. The enterprise is profitable, generating an average gross margin of Ksh. 756/bird. The multivariate regression models show that access to high-value markets, household income level and the type of production system used significantly affect profitability of indigenous chicken farming. However, poultry diseases and high input costs especially feed are the major constraints to poultry farming.Research limitations/implicationsThis study has used cross-sectional data that provides information for only one point in time. Future research should be able to capture the seasonality of indigenous chicken production.Social implicationsThis study has shown that indigenous chicken production in urban areas is a viable and profitable enterprise, which could provide an avenue for employment and income generation.Originality/valueStudies assessing profitability of urban agricultural enterprises are scant. Thus, this study provides insights on the profitability of a common urban agriculture enterprise. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies Emerald Publishing

Small-scale poultry enterprises in Kenyan medium-sized cities

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
2044-0839
DOI
10.1108/JADEE-06-2018-0067
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

PurposeThe purpose of this paper is to investigate the profitability of urban chicken production in the medium-sized cities of Kisumu and Thika, Kenya.Design/methodology/approachData were collected in 2016 from a sample of 157 indigenous chicken producers in the two cities. Descriptive analyses were used to characterize indigenous chicken production, marketing and profitability. In addition, multivariate regression models were estimated to determine factors influencing profitability of the enterprise.FindingsUrban indigenous chicken production mainly serves a dual role of food provision and income generation. The enterprise is profitable, generating an average gross margin of Ksh. 756/bird. The multivariate regression models show that access to high-value markets, household income level and the type of production system used significantly affect profitability of indigenous chicken farming. However, poultry diseases and high input costs especially feed are the major constraints to poultry farming.Research limitations/implicationsThis study has used cross-sectional data that provides information for only one point in time. Future research should be able to capture the seasonality of indigenous chicken production.Social implicationsThis study has shown that indigenous chicken production in urban areas is a viable and profitable enterprise, which could provide an avenue for employment and income generation.Originality/valueStudies assessing profitability of urban agricultural enterprises are scant. Thus, this study provides insights on the profitability of a common urban agriculture enterprise.

Journal

Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging EconomiesEmerald Publishing

Published: Jun 25, 2019

References