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Siting and Layout of Aerodromes

Siting and Layout of Aerodromes A CONVENIENT method of classification is to group air services according to the length of stages that must be flown, since the length of the stage affectsbroadlythe type of aircraft that must be employed. An aircraft that must fly nonstop distances of between 3,000 and 4,000 miles must carry, in addition to the payload, a very large load of fuel. The total load of payload and fuel is proportional to the gross weight of the aircraft and, therefore, to its dimensions, the horsepower to propel it and the cost of operation. To employ such an aircraft to carry an equivalent payload over a short route of some 200 miles would be uneconomic, for that work could be done more efficiently by aircraft that were smaller, lowerpowered and cheaper to operate, since these need not be designed to carry the very large load of fuel, in addition to payload, that the longrange aircraft must carry. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

Siting and Layout of Aerodromes

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology , Volume 16 (4): 3 – Apr 1, 1944

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb031111
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A CONVENIENT method of classification is to group air services according to the length of stages that must be flown, since the length of the stage affectsbroadlythe type of aircraft that must be employed. An aircraft that must fly nonstop distances of between 3,000 and 4,000 miles must carry, in addition to the payload, a very large load of fuel. The total load of payload and fuel is proportional to the gross weight of the aircraft and, therefore, to its dimensions, the horsepower to propel it and the cost of operation. To employ such an aircraft to carry an equivalent payload over a short route of some 200 miles would be uneconomic, for that work could be done more efficiently by aircraft that were smaller, lowerpowered and cheaper to operate, since these need not be designed to carry the very large load of fuel, in addition to payload, that the longrange aircraft must carry.

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Apr 1, 1944

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