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Single‐session therapy for teachers with a health disabling condition

Single‐session therapy for teachers with a health disabling condition A recent Alberta teacher health study indicated that teachers on long‐term disability (LTD) benefits are, for the most part, left to their own devices regarding rehabilitation. Subsequently, the authors of that study (Jevne and Zingle, 1990) recommended the development of a “psychologically and educationally sound intervention” to assist the LTD teacher in maximizing recovery. In response to this recommendation, an adaptation of single‐session therapy was developed by Talman (1990) and a pilot intervention was carried out. Thirty‐three LTD teachers, volunteered to become part of this pilot project designed to provide individualized consultation and follow‐up based on an empowerment model. The main focus of these consultations was to determine the present state of wellness and to provide new insights and expand alternatives within a caring and safe therapeutic environment. The follow‐up debriefings and evaluations indicated that most individuals experienced substantive change in many areas of wellness during the time of the study. Without assuming direct causal relationship, it would seem that this single‐session therapy approach has potential as a model of brief intervention for the “disabled” teacher. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Employee Counselling Today Emerald Publishing

Single‐session therapy for teachers with a health disabling condition

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 1995 MCB UP Ltd. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0955-8217
DOI
10.1108/13665629510081511
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A recent Alberta teacher health study indicated that teachers on long‐term disability (LTD) benefits are, for the most part, left to their own devices regarding rehabilitation. Subsequently, the authors of that study (Jevne and Zingle, 1990) recommended the development of a “psychologically and educationally sound intervention” to assist the LTD teacher in maximizing recovery. In response to this recommendation, an adaptation of single‐session therapy was developed by Talman (1990) and a pilot intervention was carried out. Thirty‐three LTD teachers, volunteered to become part of this pilot project designed to provide individualized consultation and follow‐up based on an empowerment model. The main focus of these consultations was to determine the present state of wellness and to provide new insights and expand alternatives within a caring and safe therapeutic environment. The follow‐up debriefings and evaluations indicated that most individuals experienced substantive change in many areas of wellness during the time of the study. Without assuming direct causal relationship, it would seem that this single‐session therapy approach has potential as a model of brief intervention for the “disabled” teacher.

Journal

Employee Counselling TodayEmerald Publishing

Published: Feb 1, 1995

Keywords: Benefits; Canada; Counselling; Empowerment; Illness; Psychology; Rehabilitation; Stress; Teachers

References