Should the family or the state provide support for the elderly people? Findings from a two-generational Finnish study

Should the family or the state provide support for the elderly people? Findings from a... PurposeThe purpose of this paper is to investigate public opinions towards elderly care. The authors analysed respondents’ opinions towards financial support, practical help and care for elderly people.Design/methodology/approachThe authors used nationally representative data collected in Finland in 2012. Respondents represent an older generation (born between 1945 and 1950, n=1,959) and their adult children (born between 1962 and 1993, n=1,652).FindingsFirst, the authors compared the opinions of older and younger Finns but did not find that older adults were more likely than younger adults support the state responsibility, or vice versa. It was also when only actual parent-child dyads (n=779) from same families were included. Next, the authors found that several socioeconomic and family-related variables were associated with public opinions of elderly care in both generations. For instance, in both generations lower-income individuals supported the state’s responsibility more compared to their better-off counterparts.Originality/valueThe study provides important knowledge on attitudes towards elderly care using unique two-generational data of younger and older adults. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy Emerald Publishing

Should the family or the state provide support for the elderly people? Findings from a two-generational Finnish study

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0144-333X
DOI
10.1108/IJSSP-06-2018-0102
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

PurposeThe purpose of this paper is to investigate public opinions towards elderly care. The authors analysed respondents’ opinions towards financial support, practical help and care for elderly people.Design/methodology/approachThe authors used nationally representative data collected in Finland in 2012. Respondents represent an older generation (born between 1945 and 1950, n=1,959) and their adult children (born between 1962 and 1993, n=1,652).FindingsFirst, the authors compared the opinions of older and younger Finns but did not find that older adults were more likely than younger adults support the state responsibility, or vice versa. It was also when only actual parent-child dyads (n=779) from same families were included. Next, the authors found that several socioeconomic and family-related variables were associated with public opinions of elderly care in both generations. For instance, in both generations lower-income individuals supported the state’s responsibility more compared to their better-off counterparts.Originality/valueThe study provides important knowledge on attitudes towards elderly care using unique two-generational data of younger and older adults.

Journal

International Journal of Sociology and Social PolicyEmerald Publishing

Published: Mar 11, 2019

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