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She pays her bills, mate

She pays her bills, mate Purpose – This poem aims to offer a concise representation of practised gender bias, in favour of the male, in business dealings, and to challenge that behaviour. Design/methodology/approach – The poem takes a fictional form. Findings – The poem emphasises the value of money as a symbol of power capable of overriding assumptions about the relative dominance of the male in business negotiations, together with assertive behaviour on the part of the female. Research limitations/implications – The poem underlines and challenges the tendency of some men to assume that women have only limited control over wealth in the world of commerce. Originality/value – The brief poem, rendered as an account in the first-person point-of-view, presents an encounter in which a chauvinistic environment must adjust to the reality that women necessarily perform an important financial role. Keywords Business, Women, Money, Respect, Sexual discrimination, Symbolism, Role conflict Paper type Viewpoint None of the stock and station agents Like dealing with a woman Their discomfort audible Over the satellite phone Mrs Er? Put hubby on will ya? I’m placing big orders They want business They’ll serve me And in a hurry When they see money Slowly they’ll come to respect Grudgingly I know what I’m doing I know what I want I can pay for it And I want it now Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal p. 938 q Emerald Group Publishing Limited To purchase reprints of this article please e-mail: reprints@emeraldinsight.com 0951-3574 Or visit our web site for further details: www.emeraldinsight.com/reprints DOI 10.1108/09513571111161675 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal Emerald Publishing

She pays her bills, mate

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal , Volume 24 (7): 1 – Sep 20, 2011

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2011 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0951-3574
DOI
10.1108/09513571111161675
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – This poem aims to offer a concise representation of practised gender bias, in favour of the male, in business dealings, and to challenge that behaviour. Design/methodology/approach – The poem takes a fictional form. Findings – The poem emphasises the value of money as a symbol of power capable of overriding assumptions about the relative dominance of the male in business negotiations, together with assertive behaviour on the part of the female. Research limitations/implications – The poem underlines and challenges the tendency of some men to assume that women have only limited control over wealth in the world of commerce. Originality/value – The brief poem, rendered as an account in the first-person point-of-view, presents an encounter in which a chauvinistic environment must adjust to the reality that women necessarily perform an important financial role. Keywords Business, Women, Money, Respect, Sexual discrimination, Symbolism, Role conflict Paper type Viewpoint None of the stock and station agents Like dealing with a woman Their discomfort audible Over the satellite phone Mrs Er? Put hubby on will ya? I’m placing big orders They want business They’ll serve me And in a hurry When they see money Slowly they’ll come to respect Grudgingly I know what I’m doing I know what I want I can pay for it And I want it now Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal p. 938 q Emerald Group Publishing Limited To purchase reprints of this article please e-mail: reprints@emeraldinsight.com 0951-3574 Or visit our web site for further details: www.emeraldinsight.com/reprints DOI 10.1108/09513571111161675

Journal

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability JournalEmerald Publishing

Published: Sep 20, 2011

Keywords: Business; Women; Money; Respect; Sexual discrimination; Symbolism; Role conflict

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