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Service quality, satisfaction, and behavioural intentions A study of low‐cost airline carriers in Thailand

Service quality, satisfaction, and behavioural intentions A study of low‐cost airline carriers in... Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationships among the constructs of service quality, satisfaction, and behavioural intentions in passengers of three low‐cost carriers (LCCs) offering airline services in Thailand. Design/methodology/approach – A large sample of 1,212 passengers who had travelled on LCCs in Thailand in the preceding 12 months is surveyed to test four hypothesised relationships among the constructs of service quality, satisfaction, and behavioural intentions using structural equation modelling (SEM). Findings – The study finds that the order of importance of the dimensions of service quality tested here is: flight schedules; flight attendants; tangibles; and ground staff. Passenger satisfaction with these service‐quality dimensions is found to be very important in explaining behavioural intentions. Satisfied passengers are mostly influenced by the schedule. Such customers engage in positive word‐of‐mouth communication and have high repurchase intentions. Dissatisfied passengers prefer to change airlines, rather than provide feedback to the LCCs. Research limitations/implications – The study has not definitively established causality among the constructs of service quality, satisfaction, and behavioural intentions. Moreover, satisfaction is based only on service quality. Future research should examine the causality and other possible satisfaction factors. Practical implications – Managers of LCCs who have not traditionally placed a high priority on quality should be aware of the importance of service quality and passenger satisfaction in determining the behavioural intentions of passengers of LCCs. Originality/value – The study provides an example of the use of a revised set of SERVPERF service‐quality dimensions. The study also posits passenger satisfaction and behavioural intentions in a single model in the context of LCCs in Thailand. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Managing Service Quality Emerald Publishing

Service quality, satisfaction, and behavioural intentions A study of low‐cost airline carriers in Thailand

Managing Service Quality , Volume 19 (3): 23 – May 15, 2009

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0960-4529
DOI
10.1108/09604520910955348
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationships among the constructs of service quality, satisfaction, and behavioural intentions in passengers of three low‐cost carriers (LCCs) offering airline services in Thailand. Design/methodology/approach – A large sample of 1,212 passengers who had travelled on LCCs in Thailand in the preceding 12 months is surveyed to test four hypothesised relationships among the constructs of service quality, satisfaction, and behavioural intentions using structural equation modelling (SEM). Findings – The study finds that the order of importance of the dimensions of service quality tested here is: flight schedules; flight attendants; tangibles; and ground staff. Passenger satisfaction with these service‐quality dimensions is found to be very important in explaining behavioural intentions. Satisfied passengers are mostly influenced by the schedule. Such customers engage in positive word‐of‐mouth communication and have high repurchase intentions. Dissatisfied passengers prefer to change airlines, rather than provide feedback to the LCCs. Research limitations/implications – The study has not definitively established causality among the constructs of service quality, satisfaction, and behavioural intentions. Moreover, satisfaction is based only on service quality. Future research should examine the causality and other possible satisfaction factors. Practical implications – Managers of LCCs who have not traditionally placed a high priority on quality should be aware of the importance of service quality and passenger satisfaction in determining the behavioural intentions of passengers of LCCs. Originality/value – The study provides an example of the use of a revised set of SERVPERF service‐quality dimensions. The study also posits passenger satisfaction and behavioural intentions in a single model in the context of LCCs in Thailand.

Journal

Managing Service QualityEmerald Publishing

Published: May 15, 2009

Keywords: Customer services quality; Customer satisfaction; Behaviour; Thailand; Airlines

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