Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Self‐perception and library anxiety: an empirical study

Self‐perception and library anxiety: an empirical study The relationship between seven dimensions of self‐perception and five dimensions of library anxiety was studied using canonical correlation analyses. Participants were 148 students enrolled in graduate‐level research methodology courses. The first canonical function revealed that students with the lowest level of self‐perception associated with perceived scholastic competence, perceived intellectual ability, perceived creativity, and perceived social acceptance tended to have the highest level of library anxiety related to affective barriers and comfort with the library. A comparison of the standardized and structure coefficients suggested that perceived self‐worth, barriers with staff, and mechanical barriers served as suppressor variables that assisted in the prediction of library anxiety. Implications of the findings are discussed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Library Review Emerald Publishing

Self‐perception and library anxiety: an empirical study

Library Review , Volume 48 (3): 8 – May 1, 1999

Loading next page...
 
/lp/emerald-publishing/self-perception-and-library-anxiety-an-empirical-study-0uG01FOVhI

References (33)

Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 1999 MCB UP Ltd. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0024-2535
DOI
10.1108/00242539910270312
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The relationship between seven dimensions of self‐perception and five dimensions of library anxiety was studied using canonical correlation analyses. Participants were 148 students enrolled in graduate‐level research methodology courses. The first canonical function revealed that students with the lowest level of self‐perception associated with perceived scholastic competence, perceived intellectual ability, perceived creativity, and perceived social acceptance tended to have the highest level of library anxiety related to affective barriers and comfort with the library. A comparison of the standardized and structure coefficients suggested that perceived self‐worth, barriers with staff, and mechanical barriers served as suppressor variables that assisted in the prediction of library anxiety. Implications of the findings are discussed.

Journal

Library ReviewEmerald Publishing

Published: May 1, 1999

Keywords: Anxiety; Higher education; Library users; Perceptions; Students

There are no references for this article.