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Self-initiated expatriates in the local organizations of developing countries

Self-initiated expatriates in the local organizations of developing countries The purpose of this paper is to report three main findings. First, the paper reports why local organizations in developing countries would demand self-initiated expatriates (SIEs); second, the paper reports why SIEs accept employment with such organizations; and third, the paper reports the factors that seem to govern the role allocation to SIEs.Design/methodology/approachThe authors used semi-structured interviews to elicit and collect data. The authors followed the procedures of grounded theory for data analysis.FindingsLocal organizations in developing countries seem increasingly willing to employ SIEs. Emergence of hitherto nonexistent businesses, rapid expansion, global ambition and organizational maturity seem to drive the demand for SIEs. Industrial decline elsewhere, attractiveness of emerging economies, challenging role, prior experience within similar countries and non-working spouse are factors that enable the SIEs’ acceptance of employment with such organizations. Required boundary spanning and repatriation status determine the role allocation for SIEs.Research limitations/implicationsThe findings may be idiosyncratic as they result from a qualitative research design. External validity could, therefore, be low.Practical implicationsManagers can benefit by comprehending the factors motivating SIEs to work for local organizations in developing countries. SIEs can benefit by understanding why such organizations need them, and the roles they are likely to get therein.Originality/valueUnlike the typical SIEs studied in literature, the authors theorize about SIEs who move from developed countries to work in developing countries and occupy senior positions. Additionally, unlike a typical SIE study, the authors gathered the perspectives of both SIEs and organizations. Lastly, the paper is about an emerging trend: SIEs’ employment in the local organizations of developing countries. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Management Decision Emerald Publishing

Self-initiated expatriates in the local organizations of developing countries

Management Decision , Volume 57 (7): 16 – Jul 5, 2019

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
© Emerald Publishing Limited
ISSN
0025-1747
DOI
10.1108/md-04-2017-0432
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to report three main findings. First, the paper reports why local organizations in developing countries would demand self-initiated expatriates (SIEs); second, the paper reports why SIEs accept employment with such organizations; and third, the paper reports the factors that seem to govern the role allocation to SIEs.Design/methodology/approachThe authors used semi-structured interviews to elicit and collect data. The authors followed the procedures of grounded theory for data analysis.FindingsLocal organizations in developing countries seem increasingly willing to employ SIEs. Emergence of hitherto nonexistent businesses, rapid expansion, global ambition and organizational maturity seem to drive the demand for SIEs. Industrial decline elsewhere, attractiveness of emerging economies, challenging role, prior experience within similar countries and non-working spouse are factors that enable the SIEs’ acceptance of employment with such organizations. Required boundary spanning and repatriation status determine the role allocation for SIEs.Research limitations/implicationsThe findings may be idiosyncratic as they result from a qualitative research design. External validity could, therefore, be low.Practical implicationsManagers can benefit by comprehending the factors motivating SIEs to work for local organizations in developing countries. SIEs can benefit by understanding why such organizations need them, and the roles they are likely to get therein.Originality/valueUnlike the typical SIEs studied in literature, the authors theorize about SIEs who move from developed countries to work in developing countries and occupy senior positions. Additionally, unlike a typical SIE study, the authors gathered the perspectives of both SIEs and organizations. Lastly, the paper is about an emerging trend: SIEs’ employment in the local organizations of developing countries.

Journal

Management DecisionEmerald Publishing

Published: Jul 5, 2019

Keywords: India; Developing countries; Emerging markets; Self-initiated expatriates

References