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Self‐esteem development through participation in physical activity

Self‐esteem development through participation in physical activity It is a popular belief that exercise participation has both physical and psychological benefits and, more specifically, that performance at work, cognitive function and overall self‐esteem may be enhanced through exercise. While research in this area is variable, it has been shown that a meta‐analytic approach is likely to provide reliable and valid evidence that exercise benefits extend beyond physical health and fitness. If exercise promotes self‐esteem, it is also appropriate that individual differences in perceived locus of control as an agent of self‐efficacy are recognized by employers in order that exercise programmes are adhered to; otherwise benefits that might accrue could result in the opposite outcome. Briefly discusses the importance of goal setting and the potential role of counselling and draws parallels between aspects of psychology in sport and at work. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Employee Counselling Today Emerald Publishing

Self‐esteem development through participation in physical activity

Employee Counselling Today , Volume 7 (7): 4 – Dec 1, 1995

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 1995 MCB UP Ltd. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0955-8217
DOI
10.1108/13665629510100618
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

It is a popular belief that exercise participation has both physical and psychological benefits and, more specifically, that performance at work, cognitive function and overall self‐esteem may be enhanced through exercise. While research in this area is variable, it has been shown that a meta‐analytic approach is likely to provide reliable and valid evidence that exercise benefits extend beyond physical health and fitness. If exercise promotes self‐esteem, it is also appropriate that individual differences in perceived locus of control as an agent of self‐efficacy are recognized by employers in order that exercise programmes are adhered to; otherwise benefits that might accrue could result in the opposite outcome. Briefly discusses the importance of goal setting and the potential role of counselling and draws parallels between aspects of psychology in sport and at work.

Journal

Employee Counselling TodayEmerald Publishing

Published: Dec 1, 1995

Keywords: Employers; Exercise; Goals; Psychology; Employees

References