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Segmenting the market for food shoppers using attitudes to shopping and to time

Segmenting the market for food shoppers using attitudes to shopping and to time Market segmentation in retailing can be based on traditional demographic measures of the customer base or on other measures including shoppers’ motivations. One criticism of existing approaches is that they are not based on a theoretical model of consumer behaviour. In this paper the potential for time allocation theory to provide the necessary theoretical underpinning is investigated. It is argued that attitudes to time underpin attitudes to time‐consuming activities such as food shopping. A questionnaire instrument was developed to measure five time attitudes (past, present and future orientation, time pressure and succession) and five shopping attitudes (apathy, convenience, enjoyment, shopping as a routine activity and as an event). Correlations are hypothesised between the time and shopping attitudes and shopping behaviour. The results of a survey of shoppers are reported to test these relationships. Cluster analysis is used on the shopping and time attitudes to define four segments. The ability of the clusters to identify differences in retail patronage is tested. The relative ability of time and shopping attitudes to predict patronage is compared with traditional demographic measures and the distance from the respondent’s home to the store. Attitudes to time were found to contribute more frequently in describing actual behaviour than other types of variable. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png British Food Journal Emerald Publishing

Segmenting the market for food shoppers using attitudes to shopping and to time

British Food Journal , Volume 102 (2): 21 – Mar 1, 2000

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 MCB UP Ltd. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0007-070X
DOI
10.1108/00070700010313071
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Market segmentation in retailing can be based on traditional demographic measures of the customer base or on other measures including shoppers’ motivations. One criticism of existing approaches is that they are not based on a theoretical model of consumer behaviour. In this paper the potential for time allocation theory to provide the necessary theoretical underpinning is investigated. It is argued that attitudes to time underpin attitudes to time‐consuming activities such as food shopping. A questionnaire instrument was developed to measure five time attitudes (past, present and future orientation, time pressure and succession) and five shopping attitudes (apathy, convenience, enjoyment, shopping as a routine activity and as an event). Correlations are hypothesised between the time and shopping attitudes and shopping behaviour. The results of a survey of shoppers are reported to test these relationships. Cluster analysis is used on the shopping and time attitudes to define four segments. The ability of the clusters to identify differences in retail patronage is tested. The relative ability of time and shopping attitudes to predict patronage is compared with traditional demographic measures and the distance from the respondent’s home to the store. Attitudes to time were found to contribute more frequently in describing actual behaviour than other types of variable.

Journal

British Food JournalEmerald Publishing

Published: Mar 1, 2000

Keywords: Time; Food; Shopping; Retailing; United Kingdom

References