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Security of classified information: one standard or many?

Security of classified information: one standard or many? PurposeThere should be one standard for those with access to classified data. Leadership by example should be required by all managers, supervisors and department heads. The paper aims to discuss this issue.Design/methodology/approachThis paper is a viewpoint and does not have a methodology.FindingsLeaders who work in the public sector have an inherent responsibility to earn and maintain the trust of the public for whom they serve. Regardless of whether one is a career government employee, a politician or a political appointee, all who have access to classified material should respect the necessity of safeguards to keep one’s nation’s secrets – secret.Research limitations/implicationsIf leaders fail to set the example, then nations risk further breaches of their classified information.Practical implicationsThis viewpoint applies to anyone who works in an environment dealing with classified material.Social implicationsThis viewpoint serves to educate the public on maintaining a single standard for those who handle classified material.Originality/valueThe author has yet to see much covered in peer-reviewed publications on this topic and believe that the subject is particularly relevant at this time. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Public Leadership Emerald Publishing

Security of classified information: one standard or many?

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References (7)

Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
2056-4929
DOI
10.1108/IJPL-07-2016-0028
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

PurposeThere should be one standard for those with access to classified data. Leadership by example should be required by all managers, supervisors and department heads. The paper aims to discuss this issue.Design/methodology/approachThis paper is a viewpoint and does not have a methodology.FindingsLeaders who work in the public sector have an inherent responsibility to earn and maintain the trust of the public for whom they serve. Regardless of whether one is a career government employee, a politician or a political appointee, all who have access to classified material should respect the necessity of safeguards to keep one’s nation’s secrets – secret.Research limitations/implicationsIf leaders fail to set the example, then nations risk further breaches of their classified information.Practical implicationsThis viewpoint applies to anyone who works in an environment dealing with classified material.Social implicationsThis viewpoint serves to educate the public on maintaining a single standard for those who handle classified material.Originality/valueThe author has yet to see much covered in peer-reviewed publications on this topic and believe that the subject is particularly relevant at this time.

Journal

International Journal of Public LeadershipEmerald Publishing

Published: Feb 13, 2017

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