Satisfaction with mentoring relationships: does gender identity matter?

Satisfaction with mentoring relationships: does gender identity matter? Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of gender identity on protégés' satisfaction with mentoring relationships. More specifically, it aims to investigate whether or not a protégé's feminine or masculine identity, by virtue of emphasizing different criteria, roles, and preferences, impacts his or her satisfaction with the performance of a mentor. Design/methodology/approach – Managers and/or professionals, identified by in‐career MBA students at large universities in the East, completed surveys to assess relationship satisfaction as a mentoring outcome. Findings – The results of this study indicate that masculine protégés, who strongly identify with their career roles, report being more satisfied with mentors who provide career development support. Conversely, feminine protégés, who measure career success using socio‐emotional‐based criteria, report being more satisfied with mentors who provide psychosocial support. Research limitations/implications – The study is limited in its generalizability due to the type of sample studied. The sample consisted of managers from a variety of male‐dominated occupations. In addition, since the data were self‐reported on a single survey, common method bias may also be an issue. Practical implications – Despite limitations, the study implies that assessment of gender identity and related skills can provide organizations with more effective guidance and matching of mentors and protégés to maximize perceived satisfaction on the part of the protégé. Originality/value – Although many studies have investigated a variety of factors that affect mentoring, few have examined the influence of gender identity on the functioning of these relationships. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Career Development International Emerald Publishing

Satisfaction with mentoring relationships: does gender identity matter?

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2010 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1362-0436
D.O.I.
10.1108/13620431011040923
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of gender identity on protégés' satisfaction with mentoring relationships. More specifically, it aims to investigate whether or not a protégé's feminine or masculine identity, by virtue of emphasizing different criteria, roles, and preferences, impacts his or her satisfaction with the performance of a mentor. Design/methodology/approach – Managers and/or professionals, identified by in‐career MBA students at large universities in the East, completed surveys to assess relationship satisfaction as a mentoring outcome. Findings – The results of this study indicate that masculine protégés, who strongly identify with their career roles, report being more satisfied with mentors who provide career development support. Conversely, feminine protégés, who measure career success using socio‐emotional‐based criteria, report being more satisfied with mentors who provide psychosocial support. Research limitations/implications – The study is limited in its generalizability due to the type of sample studied. The sample consisted of managers from a variety of male‐dominated occupations. In addition, since the data were self‐reported on a single survey, common method bias may also be an issue. Practical implications – Despite limitations, the study implies that assessment of gender identity and related skills can provide organizations with more effective guidance and matching of mentors and protégés to maximize perceived satisfaction on the part of the protégé. Originality/value – Although many studies have investigated a variety of factors that affect mentoring, few have examined the influence of gender identity on the functioning of these relationships.

Journal

Career Development InternationalEmerald Publishing

Published: May 25, 2010

Keywords: Gender; Mentoring; Sociology of work; Career guidance; Career development

References

  • Mentors in organizations
    Burke, R.J.
  • Not every managerial woman who makes it has a mentor
    Burke, R.J.; McKeen, C.A.
  • Reexamining a model for evaluating information center success using a structural equation modeling approach
    Chau, P.Y.K.
  • The influence of job and career attitudes on learning motivation and transfer
    Cheng, E.W.L.; Ho, D.C.K.
  • Social support and occupational stress: effects of talking to others
    Fenlason, K.J.; Beehr, T.A.
  • The relationship between mentee‐mentor gender combination and the provision of distinct mentoring functions
    Fowler, J.L.; Gudmundsson, A.J.; O'Gorman, J.G.
  • Work‐family conflict: The effect of job and family involvement
    Frone, M.R.; Rice, R.W.
  • Sex differences in the perceived importance of mentoring functions
    Levesque, L.L.; O'Neill, R.M.; Nelson, T.; Dumas, C.
  • Mentoring relationships and the female managerial career
    Linehan, M.; Walsh, J.S.
  • Perceived mentoring functions: does mentor's gender matter?
    Okurame, D.E.
  • Role stressors, social support, and well‐being among two‐career couples
    Parasuraman, S.D.; Greenhaus, J.H.; Granrose, C.S.
  • Mentorship and career mobility: an empirical investigation
    Scandura, T.
  • Leadership styles, mentoring functions received, and job‐related stress: a conceptual model and preliminary study
    Sosik, J.J.; Godshalk, V.M.
  • The more you can get the better: mentoring constellations and intrinsic career success
    Van Emmerik, H.

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