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Safety and MultiEngined Machines

Safety and MultiEngined Machines IN order to obtain machines of large carrying capacity, there is a tendency to increase the number of power units, and it is of great interest to consider the effect of this policy upon safety in flight. It is obvious that, if all the power units are of the same construction, the possibility of failure of one engine in a machine fitted with two engines is twice that in a machine fitted with one engine, so that in general the probability of one unit going out of action in a multiengined machine is proportional to the number of power units employed. In the case of a singleengined machine horizontal flight cannot be maintained after the engine fails, and unless the failure occurs in the vicinity of a safe landing ground disaster may result. In the case of a multiengined machine, however, if level flight can be maintained on the power obtainable from the remaining units, it may bo possible to arrive at a safe landing ground without further trouble. The question, therefore, arises as to which factor is the more important, the increase in the probability of failure, or the ability to fly level with an engine out of action. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

Safety and MultiEngined Machines

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology , Volume 2 (12): 6 – Dec 1, 1930

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb029345
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

IN order to obtain machines of large carrying capacity, there is a tendency to increase the number of power units, and it is of great interest to consider the effect of this policy upon safety in flight. It is obvious that, if all the power units are of the same construction, the possibility of failure of one engine in a machine fitted with two engines is twice that in a machine fitted with one engine, so that in general the probability of one unit going out of action in a multiengined machine is proportional to the number of power units employed. In the case of a singleengined machine horizontal flight cannot be maintained after the engine fails, and unless the failure occurs in the vicinity of a safe landing ground disaster may result. In the case of a multiengined machine, however, if level flight can be maintained on the power obtainable from the remaining units, it may bo possible to arrive at a safe landing ground without further trouble. The question, therefore, arises as to which factor is the more important, the increase in the probability of failure, or the ability to fly level with an engine out of action.

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Dec 1, 1930

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