Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

RFID‐enabled traceability in the food supply chain

RFID‐enabled traceability in the food supply chain Purpose – This paper aims to study the main requirements of traceability and examine how the technology of radio frequency identification (RFID) technology can address these requirements. It further seeks to outline both an information data model and a system architecture that will make traceability feasible and easily deployable across a supply chain. Design/methodology/approach – The design research approach is followed, associating traceability requirements to a proposed system design. Findings – The technological approach used has great implications in relation to the cost associated with a traceability system and the ease of its deployment. Research limitations/implications – Validation of the proposed information data model and system architecture is required through practical deployment in different settings. Practical implications – The paper provides practitioners with insight on how RFID technology can meet traceability requirements and what technological approach is more appropriate. Originality/value – Food quality has become an important issue in the last decade. However, achieving end‐to‐end traceability across the supply chain is currently quite a challenge from a technical, a co‐ordination and a cost perspective. The paper contributes by suggesting a specific technological approach, exploiting the new possibilities provided by RFID technology, to address these issues. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Industrial Management & Data Systems Emerald Publishing

RFID‐enabled traceability in the food supply chain

Loading next page...
 
/lp/emerald-publishing/rfid-enabled-traceability-in-the-food-supply-chain-fCgNkWNJob
Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0263-5577
DOI
10.1108/02635570710723804
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – This paper aims to study the main requirements of traceability and examine how the technology of radio frequency identification (RFID) technology can address these requirements. It further seeks to outline both an information data model and a system architecture that will make traceability feasible and easily deployable across a supply chain. Design/methodology/approach – The design research approach is followed, associating traceability requirements to a proposed system design. Findings – The technological approach used has great implications in relation to the cost associated with a traceability system and the ease of its deployment. Research limitations/implications – Validation of the proposed information data model and system architecture is required through practical deployment in different settings. Practical implications – The paper provides practitioners with insight on how RFID technology can meet traceability requirements and what technological approach is more appropriate. Originality/value – Food quality has become an important issue in the last decade. However, achieving end‐to‐end traceability across the supply chain is currently quite a challenge from a technical, a co‐ordination and a cost perspective. The paper contributes by suggesting a specific technological approach, exploiting the new possibilities provided by RFID technology, to address these issues.

Journal

Industrial Management & Data SystemsEmerald Publishing

Published: Mar 20, 2007

Keywords: Radio systems; Tracking; Supply chain management

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$499/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month