Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Retaining Africa's talent: the role of Africa's higher education

Retaining Africa's talent: the role of Africa's higher education Purpose – Brain drain has become a serious problem on the African continent. Most African migrants initially move out of their countries of origin to pursue higher education studies abroad. Encouraging more African students to study within the continent is seen as one way of dealing with the problem. This paper aims at understanding factors influencing African students to undertake postgraduate studies abroad. Design/methodology/approach – Focus group discussions, in‐depth interviews and an online structured questionnaire were the main approaches used for data collection. A sample of 94 international postgraduate students from Africa studying at University of Witwatersrand in South Africa was used in the analysis. Findings – The results show that conditions in both the students' countries of origin and in the possible hosting countries contribute to the decision to study abroad. Of prime importance among the factors attracting students abroad is the need to acquire an education with world‐wide recognition. Practical implications – The findings have implications for the management of the higher education sector in the continent and the marketing of a country and/or its institutions to international students coming from other African countries. Originality/value – The paper identifies the factors influencing international student mobility among African students and notes the implications of these on attracting African students wanting to study abroad to do so in countries within the continent. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Emerging Markets Emerald Publishing

Retaining Africa's talent: the role of Africa's higher education

International Journal of Emerging Markets , Volume 6 (2): 12 – Apr 12, 2011

Loading next page...
 
/lp/emerald-publishing/retaining-africa-s-talent-the-role-of-africa-s-higher-education-Fr0DHZIhJu

References (32)

Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2011 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1746-8809
DOI
10.1108/17468801111119515
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – Brain drain has become a serious problem on the African continent. Most African migrants initially move out of their countries of origin to pursue higher education studies abroad. Encouraging more African students to study within the continent is seen as one way of dealing with the problem. This paper aims at understanding factors influencing African students to undertake postgraduate studies abroad. Design/methodology/approach – Focus group discussions, in‐depth interviews and an online structured questionnaire were the main approaches used for data collection. A sample of 94 international postgraduate students from Africa studying at University of Witwatersrand in South Africa was used in the analysis. Findings – The results show that conditions in both the students' countries of origin and in the possible hosting countries contribute to the decision to study abroad. Of prime importance among the factors attracting students abroad is the need to acquire an education with world‐wide recognition. Practical implications – The findings have implications for the management of the higher education sector in the continent and the marketing of a country and/or its institutions to international students coming from other African countries. Originality/value – The paper identifies the factors influencing international student mobility among African students and notes the implications of these on attracting African students wanting to study abroad to do so in countries within the continent.

Journal

International Journal of Emerging MarketsEmerald Publishing

Published: Apr 12, 2011

Keywords: Postgraduates; Students; Higher education; Globalization; Africa

There are no references for this article.