Research Reports and Memoranda

Research Reports and Memoranda either constant along the blade, variable along the blade, disappearing at the blade tip and hub or attain­ ing maximum value at the hub. Use is made of average induced velocities and local velocities. For the single propeller the local induced velocity is used and the Under this heading are published regularly abstracts of all Reports and Memoranda of the Aeronautical circulation elliptic in (r/R)2. Calculations arc made for heavily loaded propellers. Results of wind tunnel tests Research Council, Reports and Technical Memoranda of the United States National Aeronautics and on propellers arc compared with calculated values. Space Administration and publications of other similar Research Bodies as issued. effect of switching on the field is an increase in the GREAT BRITAIN CANADA larger penetration depth and a decrease of the smaller. NATIONAL RESEARCH COUNCIL AERONAUTICAL RESEARCH COUNCIL The investigation suggests that boundary layer thick­ Ottawa 2 nesses in magneto hydrodynamics will depend on the H.M. Stationery Office, London magnetic field intensity. AERONAUTICAL REPORTS REPORTS AND MEMORANDA LR-269. Brief Experiments on a Flapped Aerofoil TECHNICAL NOTES 3133. Boundary-Layer Measurements on 15-deg. having a Cusped Cavity and a Blowing Jet at the Cusp. and 24·5-deg. Cones at Small Angles of Incidence at 30. On the One-Dimensional Overtaking of a Shock By A. D. Wood. December 1959. M=3I 7 and 3·82 and Zero Heat Transfer. By Wave by a Rarefaction Wave. By I. I. Glass, L. E. Experiments on a simple flapped aerofoil incor­ Heuckroth and S. Molder. July 1959. F . V. Davies and R. J. Monaghan. June 1957. porating a cusped cavity and having a blowing jet at (9s. 6d.) It is shown that four basic wave systems can result the cusp show that it is possible to produce a flow after the interaction consisting of a transmitted shock Transition measurements showed that the transition regime in which the cavity is occupied by a stable front was extremely sensitive to incidence, a four-fold wave and cither a reflected shock or rarefaction wave, trapped vortex. With the aerofoil immersed in a quasi- variation occurring between transition Reynolds num­ or a transmitted rarefaction wave and either a re­ two-dimensional finite stream, greater rotation of the bers on the leeward and windward sides of the 15-deg. flected shock or rarefaction wave. Limiting cases exist resultant force vector was obtained with a flap of this where cither the reflected or transmitted wave or both cone at 2-deg. incidence. At zero incidence the tran­ type than with a flap having no cavity. The results simultaneously can be Mach waves. It is shown that sition Reynolds number was between 2· 5 and indicate that the combination of a blowing jet and a for a monatomic gas and for a gas with a specific 3·0 x 106 and no significant variation was observed trapped vortex may be used to advantage in enabling heat ratio of unity some of the wave systems do not over the test range of stagnation pressures from 2 to 5 an external flow to overcome an adverse pressure exist. atmospheres. gradient. Pitot traverses on the top generator of the 15-deg. cone at Μ=3·17 showed that the effects of small FRANCE LR-271. Turbojet Thrust Augmentation: Flight angles of incidence on the characteristics of the Measurements of the Turbine Blade Cooling Accom­ MINISTÈRE DE L'AIR laminar boundary layer were nearly linear and were panying the Pre-Turbine Injection of Reheat Fuel with in excellent agreement with the theory of F. K. Moore. C.T.O., 2 Ave-de la Porte-d'Issy, Paris, 15 . an Orenda 14 Engine in a Sabre 6 Aircraft. By E . P. Cockshutt, G. G. Levy and С R. Sharp. January 1960. RAPPORTS 3147. A Note on the Theory of the Stanton Tube. Turbine blade temperature data arc presented for 351. Lieu des Racines d'une Equation Algébrique By G. E. Gadd. October 1958. (4s.) an Orenda 14 engine, which was flight tested both Dépendant d'un Paramètre Application a la Stabilité with and without reheat at altitudes ranging from Existing theories for the Stanton tube arc critically et au Guidage des Fusées. (Locus of the Roots of an 20,000 to 50,000 feet. The blade temperatures in the reviewed, and the paper then outlines a simple method Algebraic Equation depending on a Parameter. Appli­ unrcheated engine were found to be determined which predicts the calibration function at high cation to the Stability and Control of Rockets.) By F. primarily by the variation in the turbine outlet (gas) Reynolds numbers to the right order of magnitude. Salles. July 1959. temperature with flight condition. The first-stage tur­ In the first chapter the author examines the locus bine blades were cooled by the pre-turbine injection curves for complex roots of an algebraic equation de­ of the reheat fuel by a maximum of 150 deg. C. under JAPAN pending on a parameter of the first degree. The second sea-level static conditions; as had been predicted from chapter considers the application to the stabilization simple heat transfer theory, the maximum cooling AERONAUTICAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE and control of rockets in near-vertical flight. In the declined to about half this value at 50,000 feet. No UNIVERSITY OF TOKYO third chapter two numerical calculations arc given for significant cooling of the second-stage turbine blades rocket trajectories. Komabu, Meguro-ku, Tokyo was detected at any flight condition. REPORTS 352. Recherches Expérimentales sur Les Ondes LR-273. A Technique for Producing Glass-Rein­ de Choc Produites par les Décharges Condensées dans 350. An Investigation of Sampling Measurement of forced Foam-Filled Plastic Model Propeller Blades. les Gaz Rares. (Experimental Investigations of the Time Varying Random Signals through Information By A. J . Bowker and L. A. J . Pelland. January 1960. Shock Waves Produced by Condenser Discharges in Theory. By Y. Ishii. February 1960. The plastic blade compares favourably to wood and Rare Gases.) By M. Cloupeau. July 1959. In this paper, the average information amount per aluminium in all respects except strength, where Study of the light emission from electrical discharge aluminium proves more advantageous. Also, ex­ unit time obtained through sampling measurement is lamps. It is shown that the shock waves produced by tremely thin blades might be difficult to fabricate presented as a function of the power spectrum of the condenser discharges re-enter the plasma after re­ accurately in plastic. signal to be measured, the sampling frequency and the flexion from the walls of the tube and produce root mean square value (standard deviation) of It would appear, with regard to strength, rigidity, significant variations in the intensity and spectral measurement errors under the assumption that: duplicability, dimensional accuracy and stability, that composition of the radiation. (1) the signal to be measured is Gaussian and random; wood is always inferior and that the expense involved (2) the magnitudes of the measurement errors con­ in reproducing aluminium blades is warranted only 353. Sur Quelques Problèmes Posés par L'Expéri­ stitute a Gaussian distribution statistically and are when excessive stresses or very thin sections are mentation en Soufflerie Aérodynamique. (On Some independent of time as well as signal values. involved. Problems Arising in Aerodynamic Wind Tunnel Experi­ ments.) By A. Martinot-Lagarde. October 1959. INSTITUTE OF AEROPHYSICS 351. Fundamentals of Acoustical Silencers, III: Note on a method for the experimental deter­ Attenuation Characteristics Studied by an Electric University of Toronto mination of the derivative. Design of the profile Simulator. By J. Igarashi and M. Aral. February of a manifold for a wind-tunnel exit, using calcula­ REPORTS 1960. tions for incompressible flow. Similarity of internal 60. Theory of Wings in Slipstreams. By H. S. transonic flows. Spin tests in a vertical tunnel; This paper describes the method of measuring Ribner. May 1959. methods, comparison of results obtained on models attenuation characteristics by an electric simulator. and aircraft. Several acoustic elements were simulated by the A general potential theory has been developed for electric elements and the results obtained agreed well the aerodynamics of a wing in slipstreams of arbitrary to those by the acoustic method. Without constructing 354. Construction et Étalonnage d'une Soufflerie à shape or position. The central idea, involving the use any real models of the silencers we can get the attenu­ Gaz Très Raréfié. (Construction and Calibration of of a reduced potential within the slipstream jet, is ation characteristics by proper selection of the electric a Wind Tunnel for Highly Rarefied Gas.) By F . M. representation of the flow by means of two distribu­ elements. Effect of length of pipe connecting engine Devienne, G. M. Forestier, A. F. Roustan. October tions of vortices: one over the wing and its wake, and and muffler was also studied by this method. the other over the jet boundary. A pair of simultane­ ous integral equations are set up for their determina­ A wind tunnel using highly rarefied gas has been tion. The integrals are reduced to one dimension, constructed in which the static pressure can be varied 352. Deformation and Thermal Stress of Rect­ specialized to a circular jet, and approximated as over some tens of microns of mercury. Low pressure angular Beams or Flat Strips Heated at one Surface. summations. is maintained chiefly by four large three-stage vacuum By M. Uemura. March 1960. pumps. This wind tunnel has been calibrated and from In the structural members under kinetic heating, it 63. The Oscillating Plate in Magneto Hydrodynamics. the results it is concluded that, for air, the Mach is usual that the deformation problems such as buck­ By J . A. Steketee. August 1959. number, near the axis of the throat, is of the order of ling arc considered under uniform temperature dis­ four. The problem of the oscillating plane in a viscous tribution through the thickness and the thermal incompressible fluid is extended to a fluid which is stresses are given only by the temperature distribution 356. Doublet D'Hélices Coaxiales—Hélice Unique. conductive while there is a magnetic field perpendi­ through the thickness without taking account of the (Paired Coaxial Propellers—Single Propeller.) By J. cular to the plane. In the problem appear two penetra­ deformation. However, if there is a temperature Cristescu. December 1959. tion depths which depend on the intensity of the gradient through the thickness, the members may applied magnetic field; if the two penetration depths deflect from the beginning of heating exhibiting no Several methods are given for calculating pairs of are unequal when the magnetic field is absent, the buckling. coaxial propellers, assuming that the circulation is July 1960 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

Research Reports and Memoranda

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, Volume 32 (7): 1 – Jul 1, 1960

Loading next page...
 
/lp/emerald-publishing/research-reports-and-memoranda-tvfbMUjSx5
Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb033278
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

either constant along the blade, variable along the blade, disappearing at the blade tip and hub or attain­ ing maximum value at the hub. Use is made of average induced velocities and local velocities. For the single propeller the local induced velocity is used and the Under this heading are published regularly abstracts of all Reports and Memoranda of the Aeronautical circulation elliptic in (r/R)2. Calculations arc made for heavily loaded propellers. Results of wind tunnel tests Research Council, Reports and Technical Memoranda of the United States National Aeronautics and on propellers arc compared with calculated values. Space Administration and publications of other similar Research Bodies as issued. effect of switching on the field is an increase in the GREAT BRITAIN CANADA larger penetration depth and a decrease of the smaller. NATIONAL RESEARCH COUNCIL AERONAUTICAL RESEARCH COUNCIL The investigation suggests that boundary layer thick­ Ottawa 2 nesses in magneto hydrodynamics will depend on the H.M. Stationery Office, London magnetic field intensity. AERONAUTICAL REPORTS REPORTS AND MEMORANDA LR-269. Brief Experiments on a Flapped Aerofoil TECHNICAL NOTES 3133. Boundary-Layer Measurements on 15-deg. having a Cusped Cavity and a Blowing Jet at the Cusp. and 24·5-deg. Cones at Small Angles of Incidence at 30. On the One-Dimensional Overtaking of a Shock By A. D. Wood. December 1959. M=3I 7 and 3·82 and Zero Heat Transfer. By Wave by a Rarefaction Wave. By I. I. Glass, L. E. Experiments on a simple flapped aerofoil incor­ Heuckroth and S. Molder. July 1959. F . V. Davies and R. J. Monaghan. June 1957. porating a cusped cavity and having a blowing jet at (9s. 6d.) It is shown that four basic wave systems can result the cusp show that it is possible to produce a flow after the interaction consisting of a transmitted shock Transition measurements showed that the transition regime in which the cavity is occupied by a stable front was extremely sensitive to incidence, a four-fold wave and cither a reflected shock or rarefaction wave, trapped vortex. With the aerofoil immersed in a quasi- variation occurring between transition Reynolds num­ or a transmitted rarefaction wave and either a re­ two-dimensional finite stream, greater rotation of the bers on the leeward and windward sides of the 15-deg. flected shock or rarefaction wave. Limiting cases exist resultant force vector was obtained with a flap of this where cither the reflected or transmitted wave or both cone at 2-deg. incidence. At zero incidence the tran­ type than with a flap having no cavity. The results simultaneously can be Mach waves. It is shown that sition Reynolds number was between 2· 5 and indicate that the combination of a blowing jet and a for a monatomic gas and for a gas with a specific 3·0 x 106 and no significant variation was observed trapped vortex may be used to advantage in enabling heat ratio of unity some of the wave systems do not over the test range of stagnation pressures from 2 to 5 an external flow to overcome an adverse pressure exist. atmospheres. gradient. Pitot traverses on the top generator of the 15-deg. cone at Μ=3·17 showed that the effects of small FRANCE LR-271. Turbojet Thrust Augmentation: Flight angles of incidence on the characteristics of the Measurements of the Turbine Blade Cooling Accom­ MINISTÈRE DE L'AIR laminar boundary layer were nearly linear and were panying the Pre-Turbine Injection of Reheat Fuel with in excellent agreement with the theory of F. K. Moore. C.T.O., 2 Ave-de la Porte-d'Issy, Paris, 15 . an Orenda 14 Engine in a Sabre 6 Aircraft. By E . P. Cockshutt, G. G. Levy and С R. Sharp. January 1960. RAPPORTS 3147. A Note on the Theory of the Stanton Tube. Turbine blade temperature data arc presented for 351. Lieu des Racines d'une Equation Algébrique By G. E. Gadd. October 1958. (4s.) an Orenda 14 engine, which was flight tested both Dépendant d'un Paramètre Application a la Stabilité with and without reheat at altitudes ranging from Existing theories for the Stanton tube arc critically et au Guidage des Fusées. (Locus of the Roots of an 20,000 to 50,000 feet. The blade temperatures in the reviewed, and the paper then outlines a simple method Algebraic Equation depending on a Parameter. Appli­ unrcheated engine were found to be determined which predicts the calibration function at high cation to the Stability and Control of Rockets.) By F. primarily by the variation in the turbine outlet (gas) Reynolds numbers to the right order of magnitude. Salles. July 1959. temperature with flight condition. The first-stage tur­ In the first chapter the author examines the locus bine blades were cooled by the pre-turbine injection curves for complex roots of an algebraic equation de­ of the reheat fuel by a maximum of 150 deg. C. under JAPAN pending on a parameter of the first degree. The second sea-level static conditions; as had been predicted from chapter considers the application to the stabilization simple heat transfer theory, the maximum cooling AERONAUTICAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE and control of rockets in near-vertical flight. In the declined to about half this value at 50,000 feet. No UNIVERSITY OF TOKYO third chapter two numerical calculations arc given for significant cooling of the second-stage turbine blades rocket trajectories. Komabu, Meguro-ku, Tokyo was detected at any flight condition. REPORTS 352. Recherches Expérimentales sur Les Ondes LR-273. A Technique for Producing Glass-Rein­ de Choc Produites par les Décharges Condensées dans 350. An Investigation of Sampling Measurement of forced Foam-Filled Plastic Model Propeller Blades. les Gaz Rares. (Experimental Investigations of the Time Varying Random Signals through Information By A. J . Bowker and L. A. J . Pelland. January 1960. Shock Waves Produced by Condenser Discharges in Theory. By Y. Ishii. February 1960. The plastic blade compares favourably to wood and Rare Gases.) By M. Cloupeau. July 1959. In this paper, the average information amount per aluminium in all respects except strength, where Study of the light emission from electrical discharge aluminium proves more advantageous. Also, ex­ unit time obtained through sampling measurement is lamps. It is shown that the shock waves produced by tremely thin blades might be difficult to fabricate presented as a function of the power spectrum of the condenser discharges re-enter the plasma after re­ accurately in plastic. signal to be measured, the sampling frequency and the flexion from the walls of the tube and produce root mean square value (standard deviation) of It would appear, with regard to strength, rigidity, significant variations in the intensity and spectral measurement errors under the assumption that: duplicability, dimensional accuracy and stability, that composition of the radiation. (1) the signal to be measured is Gaussian and random; wood is always inferior and that the expense involved (2) the magnitudes of the measurement errors con­ in reproducing aluminium blades is warranted only 353. Sur Quelques Problèmes Posés par L'Expéri­ stitute a Gaussian distribution statistically and are when excessive stresses or very thin sections are mentation en Soufflerie Aérodynamique. (On Some independent of time as well as signal values. involved. Problems Arising in Aerodynamic Wind Tunnel Experi­ ments.) By A. Martinot-Lagarde. October 1959. INSTITUTE OF AEROPHYSICS 351. Fundamentals of Acoustical Silencers, III: Note on a method for the experimental deter­ Attenuation Characteristics Studied by an Electric University of Toronto mination of the derivative. Design of the profile Simulator. By J. Igarashi and M. Aral. February of a manifold for a wind-tunnel exit, using calcula­ REPORTS 1960. tions for incompressible flow. Similarity of internal 60. Theory of Wings in Slipstreams. By H. S. transonic flows. Spin tests in a vertical tunnel; This paper describes the method of measuring Ribner. May 1959. methods, comparison of results obtained on models attenuation characteristics by an electric simulator. and aircraft. Several acoustic elements were simulated by the A general potential theory has been developed for electric elements and the results obtained agreed well the aerodynamics of a wing in slipstreams of arbitrary to those by the acoustic method. Without constructing 354. Construction et Étalonnage d'une Soufflerie à shape or position. The central idea, involving the use any real models of the silencers we can get the attenu­ Gaz Très Raréfié. (Construction and Calibration of of a reduced potential within the slipstream jet, is ation characteristics by proper selection of the electric a Wind Tunnel for Highly Rarefied Gas.) By F . M. representation of the flow by means of two distribu­ elements. Effect of length of pipe connecting engine Devienne, G. M. Forestier, A. F. Roustan. October tions of vortices: one over the wing and its wake, and and muffler was also studied by this method. the other over the jet boundary. A pair of simultane­ ous integral equations are set up for their determina­ A wind tunnel using highly rarefied gas has been tion. The integrals are reduced to one dimension, constructed in which the static pressure can be varied 352. Deformation and Thermal Stress of Rect­ specialized to a circular jet, and approximated as over some tens of microns of mercury. Low pressure angular Beams or Flat Strips Heated at one Surface. summations. is maintained chiefly by four large three-stage vacuum By M. Uemura. March 1960. pumps. This wind tunnel has been calibrated and from In the structural members under kinetic heating, it 63. The Oscillating Plate in Magneto Hydrodynamics. the results it is concluded that, for air, the Mach is usual that the deformation problems such as buck­ By J . A. Steketee. August 1959. number, near the axis of the throat, is of the order of ling arc considered under uniform temperature dis­ four. The problem of the oscillating plane in a viscous tribution through the thickness and the thermal incompressible fluid is extended to a fluid which is stresses are given only by the temperature distribution 356. Doublet D'Hélices Coaxiales—Hélice Unique. conductive while there is a magnetic field perpendi­ through the thickness without taking account of the (Paired Coaxial Propellers—Single Propeller.) By J. cular to the plane. In the problem appear two penetra­ deformation. However, if there is a temperature Cristescu. December 1959. tion depths which depend on the intensity of the gradient through the thickness, the members may applied magnetic field; if the two penetration depths deflect from the beginning of heating exhibiting no Several methods are given for calculating pairs of are unequal when the magnetic field is absent, the buckling. coaxial propellers, assuming that the circulation is July 1960

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Jul 1, 1960

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off