Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Relocation of older people to recovery phase rehabilitation wards: adaptation patterns according to the presence of dementia

Relocation of older people to recovery phase rehabilitation wards: adaptation patterns according... Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to use an assessment sheet clarifying the characteristics related to adaptation in order to support the relocation of older people to recovery phase rehabilitation wards (RPRW). Design/methodology/approach – A survey was conducted with older people aged 70 and above two weeks after relocation. Nurses responsible for the older people were asked to complete the sheet. Of the 44 items on the sheet, the 38 items not directly related to basic attributes constituted the scale of the state of adaptation. A total of 336 valid response sheets were analyzed. Findings – Higher scores on the scale represented higher levels of adaptation, and when scores were analyzed, results showed that there was a tendency for the scores of older people aged 80 and above and older people with dementia to be significantly lower. Items that showed differences according to the presence of dementia included those showing adaptive tasks, such as “Condition has deteriorated since the time of relocation” and “Experiencing difficulties when nurses are giving care.” The tendencies of older people to adapt to relocation depending on the presence of dementia were clarified through the items on the scale. Originality/value – It is necessary to pay attention to older people's physical and social environmental factors, adaptive tasks, and coping skills when they relocate to RPRW. The authors suggest that an approach based on the results of this study could help older people adapt to their new environment. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Working with Older People Emerald Publishing

Relocation of older people to recovery phase rehabilitation wards: adaptation patterns according to the presence of dementia

Working with Older People , Volume 18 (4): 9 – Dec 2, 2014

Loading next page...
 
/lp/emerald-publishing/relocation-of-older-people-to-recovery-phase-rehabilitation-wards-K385g9hCiV

References (10)

Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
1366-3666
DOI
10.1108/WWOP-08-2014-0021
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to use an assessment sheet clarifying the characteristics related to adaptation in order to support the relocation of older people to recovery phase rehabilitation wards (RPRW). Design/methodology/approach – A survey was conducted with older people aged 70 and above two weeks after relocation. Nurses responsible for the older people were asked to complete the sheet. Of the 44 items on the sheet, the 38 items not directly related to basic attributes constituted the scale of the state of adaptation. A total of 336 valid response sheets were analyzed. Findings – Higher scores on the scale represented higher levels of adaptation, and when scores were analyzed, results showed that there was a tendency for the scores of older people aged 80 and above and older people with dementia to be significantly lower. Items that showed differences according to the presence of dementia included those showing adaptive tasks, such as “Condition has deteriorated since the time of relocation” and “Experiencing difficulties when nurses are giving care.” The tendencies of older people to adapt to relocation depending on the presence of dementia were clarified through the items on the scale. Originality/value – It is necessary to pay attention to older people's physical and social environmental factors, adaptive tasks, and coping skills when they relocate to RPRW. The authors suggest that an approach based on the results of this study could help older people adapt to their new environment.

Journal

Working with Older PeopleEmerald Publishing

Published: Dec 2, 2014

There are no references for this article.