Relationship between occupational commitment and ascribed importance of organisational characteristics

Relationship between occupational commitment and ascribed importance of organisational... Purpose – This purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between dimensions of commitment to the profession of business, and ascribed importance of various organisational characteristics to the first full‐time job following graduation. Design/methodology/approach – Business administration students ( n =446) completed surveys on dimensions of their commitment to the profession of business and the importance they ascribed to having certain organisational characteristics in their first full‐time job ( n =132). Confirmatory factor analysis of commitment scales, principal component analysis of organisational characteristics, and canonical correlations were used. Findings – Affective occupational commitment was differentially, positively associated with the importance ascribed to working in an organisation that offers opportunities for professional development. Normative occupational commitment was differentially, positively associated with the importance ascribed to working in a reputable organisation that is devoted to diversity and social responsibility. Research limitations/implications – Additional evaluation using multi‐source and behavioural data would be useful. Practical implications – Knowledge of the relationship between types of occupational commitment and desired organisational characteristics among university students could inform organisational positioning relative to recruitment. Originality/value – Results reported in this paper demonstrate the potential relevance of occupational commitment components into the processes of recruitment and applicant attraction among university students. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Education + Training Emerald Publishing

Relationship between occupational commitment and ascribed importance of organisational characteristics

Education + Training, Volume 53 (1): 15 – Feb 15, 2011

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2011 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0040-0912
D.O.I.
10.1108/00400911111102379
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – This purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between dimensions of commitment to the profession of business, and ascribed importance of various organisational characteristics to the first full‐time job following graduation. Design/methodology/approach – Business administration students ( n =446) completed surveys on dimensions of their commitment to the profession of business and the importance they ascribed to having certain organisational characteristics in their first full‐time job ( n =132). Confirmatory factor analysis of commitment scales, principal component analysis of organisational characteristics, and canonical correlations were used. Findings – Affective occupational commitment was differentially, positively associated with the importance ascribed to working in an organisation that offers opportunities for professional development. Normative occupational commitment was differentially, positively associated with the importance ascribed to working in a reputable organisation that is devoted to diversity and social responsibility. Research limitations/implications – Additional evaluation using multi‐source and behavioural data would be useful. Practical implications – Knowledge of the relationship between types of occupational commitment and desired organisational characteristics among university students could inform organisational positioning relative to recruitment. Originality/value – Results reported in this paper demonstrate the potential relevance of occupational commitment components into the processes of recruitment and applicant attraction among university students.

Journal

Education + TrainingEmerald Publishing

Published: Feb 15, 2011

Keywords: Job satisfaction; Organizational culture; Professional education; Recruitment; Retention; Social responsibility

References

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