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Reducing the surface deviation of stereolithography using in‐process techniques

Reducing the surface deviation of stereolithography using in‐process techniques Builds on previous research by the authors to establish a mathematical representation of the surface roughness of stereolithography (SL) parts. It is the intention of the research to use this modelling technique as a design tool for defining optimum build orientation and planning post‐process finishing operations. During the development of this model, a number of in‐process attributes inherent in SL were seen to affect surface deviation. Most notably the phenomenon known as “print‐through” on down‐facing planes produces a build orientation envelope of very smooth surfaces. Although capable of providing low roughness over some 50°, print‐through smoothing cannot easily be extended to other angles, hence complementary processes for surface smoothing must be developed. Discusses a number of possible solutions, showing how the generation of a meniscus between layers can prove beneficial in reducing SL surface roughness, hence reducing the need for lengthy manual finishing operations. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Rapid Prototyping Journal Emerald Publishing

Reducing the surface deviation of stereolithography using in‐process techniques

Rapid Prototyping Journal , Volume 3 (1): 12 – Mar 1, 1997

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References (22)

Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 1997 MCB UP Ltd. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1355-2546
DOI
10.1108/13552549710169255
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Builds on previous research by the authors to establish a mathematical representation of the surface roughness of stereolithography (SL) parts. It is the intention of the research to use this modelling technique as a design tool for defining optimum build orientation and planning post‐process finishing operations. During the development of this model, a number of in‐process attributes inherent in SL were seen to affect surface deviation. Most notably the phenomenon known as “print‐through” on down‐facing planes produces a build orientation envelope of very smooth surfaces. Although capable of providing low roughness over some 50°, print‐through smoothing cannot easily be extended to other angles, hence complementary processes for surface smoothing must be developed. Discusses a number of possible solutions, showing how the generation of a meniscus between layers can prove beneficial in reducing SL surface roughness, hence reducing the need for lengthy manual finishing operations.

Journal

Rapid Prototyping JournalEmerald Publishing

Published: Mar 1, 1997

Keywords: Modelling; Prototyping; Surface finishing

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