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Reducing Stress in NHS Staff

Reducing Stress in NHS Staff There is mounting evidence that working in the NHS is verystressful. To reduce the effects of stress on the health and functioningof hospital staff, counselling services have been introduced, but seldomevaluated. This study evaluates the outcome of such a service for thefirst 100 staff seen. The most frequent problems were work inducedstress, depression, anxiety and relationship problems. Most staff wereseen for three or fewer sessions, with 50 per cent requiring no furtherhelp. Most perceived the sessions as very helpful, both immediately andsix months later. Significant improvements were found in selfreportedanxiety, depression, satisfaction with self and life outside work andfunctioning at work and outside. These were maintained at six monthsfollowup, although functioning outside work was no longer significantlyimproved. Problems of evaluation of this kind of counselling service areaddressed, with suggestions about establishing a control group. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Employee Counselling Today Emerald Publishing

Reducing Stress in NHS Staff

Employee Counselling Today , Volume 4 (1): 4 – Jan 1, 1992

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0955-8217
DOI
10.1108/13665629210011890
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

There is mounting evidence that working in the NHS is verystressful. To reduce the effects of stress on the health and functioningof hospital staff, counselling services have been introduced, but seldomevaluated. This study evaluates the outcome of such a service for thefirst 100 staff seen. The most frequent problems were work inducedstress, depression, anxiety and relationship problems. Most staff wereseen for three or fewer sessions, with 50 per cent requiring no furtherhelp. Most perceived the sessions as very helpful, both immediately andsix months later. Significant improvements were found in selfreportedanxiety, depression, satisfaction with self and life outside work andfunctioning at work and outside. These were maintained at six monthsfollowup, although functioning outside work was no longer significantlyimproved. Problems of evaluation of this kind of counselling service areaddressed, with suggestions about establishing a control group.

Journal

Employee Counselling TodayEmerald Publishing

Published: Jan 1, 1992

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