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REDUCING ORGANIZATIONAL CONFLICT THE ROLE OF SOCIALLYINDUCED POSITIVE AFFECT

REDUCING ORGANIZATIONAL CONFLICT THE ROLE OF SOCIALLYINDUCED POSITIVE AFFECT Two studies were conducted to investigate the impact of sociallyinduced positive affect on organizational conflict. In Study I, male and female subjects were provoked or not provoked, and then exposed to one of several treatments designed to induce positive affect among them. Results indicated that several of these procedures e.g., mild flattery, a small gift, selfdeprecating remarks by an opponent increased subjects' preference for resolving conflict through collaboration, but reduced their preference for resolving conflict through competition. In addition, selfdeprecating remarks by an opponent actually an accomplice increased subjects' willingness to make concessions to this person during negotiations. In Study 2, male and female subjects were exposed to two treatments designed to induce positive affect humorous remarks, mild flattery. These were presented before, during, or after negotiations with another person an accomplice. Both treatments reduced subjects' preferences for resolving conflict through avoidance and increased their preferences for resolving conflict through collaboration, but only when delivered during or immediately after negotiations. Together, the results of both studies suggest that simple interventions designed to induce positive affect among the parties to conflicts can yield several beneficial effects. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Conflict Management Emerald Publishing

REDUCING ORGANIZATIONAL CONFLICT THE ROLE OF SOCIALLYINDUCED POSITIVE AFFECT

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
1044-4068
DOI
10.1108/eb022677
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Two studies were conducted to investigate the impact of sociallyinduced positive affect on organizational conflict. In Study I, male and female subjects were provoked or not provoked, and then exposed to one of several treatments designed to induce positive affect among them. Results indicated that several of these procedures e.g., mild flattery, a small gift, selfdeprecating remarks by an opponent increased subjects' preference for resolving conflict through collaboration, but reduced their preference for resolving conflict through competition. In addition, selfdeprecating remarks by an opponent actually an accomplice increased subjects' willingness to make concessions to this person during negotiations. In Study 2, male and female subjects were exposed to two treatments designed to induce positive affect humorous remarks, mild flattery. These were presented before, during, or after negotiations with another person an accomplice. Both treatments reduced subjects' preferences for resolving conflict through avoidance and increased their preferences for resolving conflict through collaboration, but only when delivered during or immediately after negotiations. Together, the results of both studies suggest that simple interventions designed to induce positive affect among the parties to conflicts can yield several beneficial effects.

Journal

International Journal of Conflict ManagementEmerald Publishing

Published: Feb 1, 1990

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