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Recognizing human concurrent activities using wearable sensors: a statistical modeling approach based on parallel HMM

Recognizing human concurrent activities using wearable sensors: a statistical modeling approach... PurposeIn sensor-based activity recognition, most of the previous studies focused on single activities such as body posture, ambulation and simple daily activities. Few works have been done to analyze complex concurrent activities. The purpose of this paper is to use a statistical modeling approach to classify them.Design/methodology/approachIn this study, the recognition problem of concurrent activities is explored with the framework of parallel hidden Markov model (PHMM), where two basic HMMs are used to model the upper limb movements and lower limb states, respectively. Statistical time-domain and frequency-domain features are extracted, and then processed by the principal component analysis method for classification. To recognize specific concurrent activities, PHMM merges the information (by combining probabilities) from both channels to make the final decision.FindingsFour studies are investigated to validate the effectiveness of the proposed method. The results show that PHMM can classify 12 daily concurrent activities with an average recognition rate of 93.2 per cent, which is superior to regular HMM and several single-frame classification approaches.Originality/valueA statistical modeling approach based on PHMM is investigated, and it proved to be effective in concurrent activity recognition. This might provide more accurate feedback on people’s behaviors.Practical implicationsThe research may be significant in the field of pervasive healthcare, supporting a variety of practical applications such as elderly care, ambient assisted living and remote monitoring. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Sensor Review Emerald Publishing

Recognizing human concurrent activities using wearable sensors: a statistical modeling approach based on parallel HMM

Sensor Review , Volume 37 (3): 8 – Jun 19, 2017

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References (34)

Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0260-2288
DOI
10.1108/SR-01-2017-0003
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

PurposeIn sensor-based activity recognition, most of the previous studies focused on single activities such as body posture, ambulation and simple daily activities. Few works have been done to analyze complex concurrent activities. The purpose of this paper is to use a statistical modeling approach to classify them.Design/methodology/approachIn this study, the recognition problem of concurrent activities is explored with the framework of parallel hidden Markov model (PHMM), where two basic HMMs are used to model the upper limb movements and lower limb states, respectively. Statistical time-domain and frequency-domain features are extracted, and then processed by the principal component analysis method for classification. To recognize specific concurrent activities, PHMM merges the information (by combining probabilities) from both channels to make the final decision.FindingsFour studies are investigated to validate the effectiveness of the proposed method. The results show that PHMM can classify 12 daily concurrent activities with an average recognition rate of 93.2 per cent, which is superior to regular HMM and several single-frame classification approaches.Originality/valueA statistical modeling approach based on PHMM is investigated, and it proved to be effective in concurrent activity recognition. This might provide more accurate feedback on people’s behaviors.Practical implicationsThe research may be significant in the field of pervasive healthcare, supporting a variety of practical applications such as elderly care, ambient assisted living and remote monitoring.

Journal

Sensor ReviewEmerald Publishing

Published: Jun 19, 2017

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