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Recent Technical Developments

Recent Technical Developments 298 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING November, 1931 Petro l Storage—An Engine Starter for Pilots—High- Speed Magnetos—Uses of Rubber STORAG E AND DELIVER Y OF PETROL Th e danger of explosion from fire is entirely Bywater' s hydraulic petrol storage system, as eliminated where the hydraulic system is installed, its name implies, is based on th e us e of wate r power, inasmuc h as no explosive mixture is formed when an d the method adopted is to displace the liquid th e petrol is drawn off, as wate r takes the place of in storage by water, thus obtaining many advan­ wha t in other systems would be vapour. tages, including that of always having storage Th e system, which was in use in a number of tank s full of cither water or the liquid in storage, airshi p stations during the war, is installed at or both in combination, which entirely avoids Hesto n and Broxbourne, and is under construction evaporation . No pumps are used whatever, thus a t Reading and Portsmouth aerodromes. Full savin g power and eliminating all th e upkeep costs detail s can be obtained from Bywater & Co. of 121 an d diiiiculties connected with pumps working in Kingsway, London, W.C. volatile liquids. Labour cost is reduced to a minimu m as th e wate r does al l th e work . A further importan t advantage lies in the fact tha t th e liquid WATFOR D MAGNETOS delivered is entirely free from water and foreign I n the article on the Rolls-Royce "R " engine, matte r owing to the liquid being forced out of th e publishe d in the October issue of AIRCRAFT to p of the storage tank instead of being drawn ENGINEERING , mention was made of Watford b y suction pipe a s in th e case of pumpin g an d other magnetos . It is now known that an Aero Model pressure systems. There being no evaporation, no magnet o of this make was used in the Super- explosive mixture is generated in the tank, thus marin e S.6.B seaplane when it set up the new avoiding an y possibility of fire b y explosion. speed record piloted by Flight-Lieutenant Stainforth . In addition to this, Watford magnetos Numerou s cases have occurred where, with or­ were fitted in Sir Malcolm Campbell's "Bluebird" dinar y pumping systems placed underground, the when it set u p the world's motor record, and in tank s have floated owing to the ground becoming Mr. Kaye Don's "Miss England II " when this waterlogged. The tanks of the hydraulic system boa t gained the world's record for speed on water, alway s being full of liquid, this cannot occur. Th e system consists of a steel storage tank in Nort h & Sons, Ltd., of Whippindale Road, which the petrol is stored. As this is delivered Watford , can, therefore, claim to hold the world's int o the tank , it displaces a like quantit y of water. speed records on land, water, and in th e air . They As it is drawn off, the petrol is in turn displaced also, among other successes, attained first and b y running water into the bottom of the tank, second places in this year's King's Cup Air Race. thu s forcing the liquid out of the top, where it The y also make speedometers and a revolution passes through a meter. indicato r for aero-engines. On this basis it will be seen that a hydraulic syste m can consist either of a single tank and its Th e vapour thus displaced actually represents accompanyin g meters, or an elaborate plant con­ 0·6 of 1 per cent (i.e., one volume of petrol will RUBBE R IN AEROPLANES. sisting of several tanks, meters, etc., merely de­ evaporat e into 163 volumes of vapour), or 6 gallons I n connection with Mr. Handasyde's article in pendin g on the head of water employed to deliver of petrol is lost every time a 1,000-gallon tank is thi s issue it is interesting to note that the Avon th e liquid, duly measured, at any given points, refilled. Indi a Rubber Co., Ltd., of Melksham, Wilts., eithe r in th e hangars or on th e aerodrome. Th e reduction in the cost of labour with the supply rubber fittings of various types to Messrs. An important point regarding petrol storage in hydrauli c system is also important. Practically th e Saunders-Roe. The same firm also contributed to bul k is the question of evaporation. This is a only labour cost for th e handling, delivering, an d th e success of the S.6.B, being suppliers to the little-understoo d subject, and usually dismissed measurin g of petrol and other liquids is th e cost Supermarin e Aviation Company for these seaplanes. a s negligible. However, its continuity makes it of water, which ma y b e take n as from 1s. t o 1s. 6d. I t is not generally realised how much rubber is a matter of importance. It can easily be under­ per 1,000 gallons. That is to say, the hydraulic incorporated in aeroplan e design. Besides th e tyres stood tha t an ordinar y tank when it has once been syste m will deliver to an y given point, or number an d shock absorbers there are less obvious places filled with petrol remains full of vapour when the of points, measure, and total the quantity of in which it is used, such as rubbe r blocks for engine petrol is drawn or pumped out, an d it follows that 1,000 gallons of the liquid in storage for th e su m mounting s and in the upholstery of commercial a fresh supply of petrol will displace this vapour. of 1s. or 1s. 6d. aircraft. VICKER S AEROPLANE ACCESSORIES Vickers (Aviation) Limited, of Weybridge, Surrey, send a copy of the 1931 edition of their catalogue of accessories for aircraft. Prominent amon g them is the Duplex hand compressor, of whic h a description was given on page 210 of the August, 1931, issue of AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING, accompanie d by an illustration showing the com­ pressor installed in an aeroplane. A drawing of thi s handy engine-starter, which only weighs 8¾ lb . and can be operated by one or two men, is given on thi s page. I t is difficult to imagine a more comprehensive guide t o th e various accessories that are necessary for the modern aeroplane than this catalogue, whic h covers 188 quarto pages. The Vickcrs hydrauli c brakes are described, with details of dimensions and weights and a number of in­ formativ e illustrations. Cocks, valves, flow in­ dicators, filters, and pumps for fuel, oil, and wate r systems are next dealt with, followed by variou s metal connections and fittings for fuel pipes . Oleo-pneumatic shock absorbers with capacit y for initial loads of from 1,600 lb. u p to 10,050 1b. can be supplied with manually operated pump s for their maintenance. The Vickers-Potts oil-cooler is now so well known as hardly to need mention . The book concludes with a very com­ prehensive series of useful tables of gauges, con­ stants , weights, etc., including a most valuable set of extended conversion tables. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

Recent Technical Developments

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology , Volume 3 (11): 1 – Nov 1, 1931

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb029479
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

298 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING November, 1931 Petro l Storage—An Engine Starter for Pilots—High- Speed Magnetos—Uses of Rubber STORAG E AND DELIVER Y OF PETROL Th e danger of explosion from fire is entirely Bywater' s hydraulic petrol storage system, as eliminated where the hydraulic system is installed, its name implies, is based on th e us e of wate r power, inasmuc h as no explosive mixture is formed when an d the method adopted is to displace the liquid th e petrol is drawn off, as wate r takes the place of in storage by water, thus obtaining many advan­ wha t in other systems would be vapour. tages, including that of always having storage Th e system, which was in use in a number of tank s full of cither water or the liquid in storage, airshi p stations during the war, is installed at or both in combination, which entirely avoids Hesto n and Broxbourne, and is under construction evaporation . No pumps are used whatever, thus a t Reading and Portsmouth aerodromes. Full savin g power and eliminating all th e upkeep costs detail s can be obtained from Bywater & Co. of 121 an d diiiiculties connected with pumps working in Kingsway, London, W.C. volatile liquids. Labour cost is reduced to a minimu m as th e wate r does al l th e work . A further importan t advantage lies in the fact tha t th e liquid WATFOR D MAGNETOS delivered is entirely free from water and foreign I n the article on the Rolls-Royce "R " engine, matte r owing to the liquid being forced out of th e publishe d in the October issue of AIRCRAFT to p of the storage tank instead of being drawn ENGINEERING , mention was made of Watford b y suction pipe a s in th e case of pumpin g an d other magnetos . It is now known that an Aero Model pressure systems. There being no evaporation, no magnet o of this make was used in the Super- explosive mixture is generated in the tank, thus marin e S.6.B seaplane when it set up the new avoiding an y possibility of fire b y explosion. speed record piloted by Flight-Lieutenant Stainforth . In addition to this, Watford magnetos Numerou s cases have occurred where, with or­ were fitted in Sir Malcolm Campbell's "Bluebird" dinar y pumping systems placed underground, the when it set u p the world's motor record, and in tank s have floated owing to the ground becoming Mr. Kaye Don's "Miss England II " when this waterlogged. The tanks of the hydraulic system boa t gained the world's record for speed on water, alway s being full of liquid, this cannot occur. Th e system consists of a steel storage tank in Nort h & Sons, Ltd., of Whippindale Road, which the petrol is stored. As this is delivered Watford , can, therefore, claim to hold the world's int o the tank , it displaces a like quantit y of water. speed records on land, water, and in th e air . They As it is drawn off, the petrol is in turn displaced also, among other successes, attained first and b y running water into the bottom of the tank, second places in this year's King's Cup Air Race. thu s forcing the liquid out of the top, where it The y also make speedometers and a revolution passes through a meter. indicato r for aero-engines. On this basis it will be seen that a hydraulic syste m can consist either of a single tank and its Th e vapour thus displaced actually represents accompanyin g meters, or an elaborate plant con­ 0·6 of 1 per cent (i.e., one volume of petrol will RUBBE R IN AEROPLANES. sisting of several tanks, meters, etc., merely de­ evaporat e into 163 volumes of vapour), or 6 gallons I n connection with Mr. Handasyde's article in pendin g on the head of water employed to deliver of petrol is lost every time a 1,000-gallon tank is thi s issue it is interesting to note that the Avon th e liquid, duly measured, at any given points, refilled. Indi a Rubber Co., Ltd., of Melksham, Wilts., eithe r in th e hangars or on th e aerodrome. Th e reduction in the cost of labour with the supply rubber fittings of various types to Messrs. An important point regarding petrol storage in hydrauli c system is also important. Practically th e Saunders-Roe. The same firm also contributed to bul k is the question of evaporation. This is a only labour cost for th e handling, delivering, an d th e success of the S.6.B, being suppliers to the little-understoo d subject, and usually dismissed measurin g of petrol and other liquids is th e cost Supermarin e Aviation Company for these seaplanes. a s negligible. However, its continuity makes it of water, which ma y b e take n as from 1s. t o 1s. 6d. I t is not generally realised how much rubber is a matter of importance. It can easily be under­ per 1,000 gallons. That is to say, the hydraulic incorporated in aeroplan e design. Besides th e tyres stood tha t an ordinar y tank when it has once been syste m will deliver to an y given point, or number an d shock absorbers there are less obvious places filled with petrol remains full of vapour when the of points, measure, and total the quantity of in which it is used, such as rubbe r blocks for engine petrol is drawn or pumped out, an d it follows that 1,000 gallons of the liquid in storage for th e su m mounting s and in the upholstery of commercial a fresh supply of petrol will displace this vapour. of 1s. or 1s. 6d. aircraft. VICKER S AEROPLANE ACCESSORIES Vickers (Aviation) Limited, of Weybridge, Surrey, send a copy of the 1931 edition of their catalogue of accessories for aircraft. Prominent amon g them is the Duplex hand compressor, of whic h a description was given on page 210 of the August, 1931, issue of AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING, accompanie d by an illustration showing the com­ pressor installed in an aeroplane. A drawing of thi s handy engine-starter, which only weighs 8¾ lb . and can be operated by one or two men, is given on thi s page. I t is difficult to imagine a more comprehensive guide t o th e various accessories that are necessary for the modern aeroplane than this catalogue, whic h covers 188 quarto pages. The Vickcrs hydrauli c brakes are described, with details of dimensions and weights and a number of in­ formativ e illustrations. Cocks, valves, flow in­ dicators, filters, and pumps for fuel, oil, and wate r systems are next dealt with, followed by variou s metal connections and fittings for fuel pipes . Oleo-pneumatic shock absorbers with capacit y for initial loads of from 1,600 lb. u p to 10,050 1b. can be supplied with manually operated pump s for their maintenance. The Vickers-Potts oil-cooler is now so well known as hardly to need mention . The book concludes with a very com­ prehensive series of useful tables of gauges, con­ stants , weights, etc., including a most valuable set of extended conversion tables.

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Nov 1, 1931

There are no references for this article.