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Rare instances of individuals with autism supporting or engaging in terrorism: a response to Lino Faccini and Clare Allely

Rare instances of individuals with autism supporting or engaging in terrorism: a response to Lino... Rare instances of individuals with autism supporting or engaging in terrorism: a response to Lino Faccini and Clare Allely Nicholas Paul Chown, Luke Beardon and Kleio Cossburn The authors of the above article were careful, both in the title of their article, and in the main body text, to make it clear to readers that the involvement of persons with autism in terrorism is a rare occurrence. Our analysis of the case studies in the article suggests that concurrence of autism per se and terrorism may actually be even less than is implied by the authors. We felt compelled to write to you in view of the potential for autism to be wrongly associated with terrorism in the minds of the public despite attempts to ensure objectivity. In a journal with a focus on intellectual disability[1] (ID), the authors should make it clear that autism per se is not an ID. Where there is co-morbid ID in addition to autism, the situation is more complex and conclusions cannot be drawn so easily about autism (or ID). We believe that the following points support our view that the concurrence of autism and terrorism is likely to be significantly less than http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour Emerald Publishing

Rare instances of individuals with autism supporting or engaging in terrorism: a response to Lino Faccini and Clare Allely

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
2050-8824
DOI
10.1108/JIDOB-06-2017-0012
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Rare instances of individuals with autism supporting or engaging in terrorism: a response to Lino Faccini and Clare Allely Nicholas Paul Chown, Luke Beardon and Kleio Cossburn The authors of the above article were careful, both in the title of their article, and in the main body text, to make it clear to readers that the involvement of persons with autism in terrorism is a rare occurrence. Our analysis of the case studies in the article suggests that concurrence of autism per se and terrorism may actually be even less than is implied by the authors. We felt compelled to write to you in view of the potential for autism to be wrongly associated with terrorism in the minds of the public despite attempts to ensure objectivity. In a journal with a focus on intellectual disability[1] (ID), the authors should make it clear that autism per se is not an ID. Where there is co-morbid ID in addition to autism, the situation is more complex and conclusions cannot be drawn so easily about autism (or ID). We believe that the following points support our view that the concurrence of autism and terrorism is likely to be significantly less than

Journal

Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending BehaviourEmerald Publishing

Published: Mar 12, 2018

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