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Rain Erosion Tests on Aircraft Surfaces at Supersonic Speeds

Rain Erosion Tests on Aircraft Surfaces at Supersonic Speeds parachute after it is released, tearing it to shreads. Average recovery rate is 95 per cent. Specimens Rain Erosion Tests on Aircraft are re-fired until complete data are obtained. Parachutes can be re-used about six times. W. L. Dittmann, Convair research group engineer, is in charge of the rain-erosion project Surfaces at Supersonic Speeds being conducted for the Wright Air Development Centre, Materials Laboratory. Dittman reports that a great amount of data is being compiled MONG new problems faced by design nozzles are installed at 10-foot intervals along the which has not been available before. Although engineers of supersonic aircraft and missiles pipe. This produces a continuous uniform rainfall A the test specimens are small in size, an economical is the destructive effect of rain. At transonic rate of 2 inches per hour with an average rain evaluation of many different types of materials and supersonic speeds, rain erosion of aircraft drop diameter of 2 mm. can be made. The best materials can be selected materials may prove to be a limiting factor in After firing about a dozen rounds, Convair for larger scale tests. Good correlation of test data all-weather flying conditions. engineers search the drop area and retrieve the with theoretical analysis being conducted at the In order to determine the best materials for miniature parachutes and specimens for evalua­ National Bureau of Standards is being obtained. missiles and aircraft, the Convair Division of tion. In rare instances a projectile overtakes the General Dynamics Corporation at San Diego, California, has developed a ballistic method of testing specimens. Tests are conducted under controlled rain conditions up to speeds of 1900 miles an hour, approximately Mach 2·5. Test specimens are mounted in the nose of a modified 20-mm. projectile and fired horizontally from a standard 20-mm. aircraft cannon through simulated rainfall. Upon firing, a tracer element in the projectile is ignited and burns for approxi­ mately ¾ second. A black powder separation charge then ignites and expels the test specimen and parachute. Opening loads on the 6-inch vented-canopy nylon parachute are 500 pounds. This load checks the forward velocity of the speci­ men within 10 feet. Parachute and specimen land about 1,500 feet from the firing point. Speed of the projectile can be varied from Mach 1·0 to Mach 2·5 by controlling the main powder charge. Convair is testing two types of projectile heads —ogee, or rounded heads, and dumdum heads, which are disks of metal, plastics, or ceramics. Rainfall is simulated by a 500-foot sprinkling system installed on Camp Elliott property near San Diego. The sprinkling system, operated by a portable pump, consists of a single horizontal pipe mounted three feet above the ground. Spray Fellowship of the Society Dr John Hadji-Argyris THE ROYAL AERONAUTICAL SOCIETY Dr George Steedman Hislop Dr Kenneth Glenny Bergin David James Mr N. E. Rowe has taken office as President of John Cecil Kelly-Rogers George Bruce Bolt the Society. Air Marshal Sir John Nelson Boothman Paget McCormack Dr Norman Adrian de Bruyne Sir Arthur de Terrotte Nevill Horace William Clarke Dr Joseph Henry Preston The following awards have been made: Eric John Earnshaw Thomas Simpson William Marlow Evans Sir Lawrence James Wackett Honorary Fellowship of the Society James Charles Floyd John Leslie Watkins Dr Igor I. Sikorsky, F.I.A.S., M.A.S.M.E. Sir Wilmot Hudson Fysh Frank Leslie Wattendorf Mr H. Grinsted, C.B.E., B.Sc., F.C.G.I., F.R.Ae.S. Esmond Allen Gibson Daniel Howell Williams. Aircraft Engineering http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

Rain Erosion Tests on Aircraft Surfaces at Supersonic Speeds

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology , Volume 27 (6): 1 – Jun 1, 1955

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb032564
Publisher site
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Abstract

parachute after it is released, tearing it to shreads. Average recovery rate is 95 per cent. Specimens Rain Erosion Tests on Aircraft are re-fired until complete data are obtained. Parachutes can be re-used about six times. W. L. Dittmann, Convair research group engineer, is in charge of the rain-erosion project Surfaces at Supersonic Speeds being conducted for the Wright Air Development Centre, Materials Laboratory. Dittman reports that a great amount of data is being compiled MONG new problems faced by design nozzles are installed at 10-foot intervals along the which has not been available before. Although engineers of supersonic aircraft and missiles pipe. This produces a continuous uniform rainfall A the test specimens are small in size, an economical is the destructive effect of rain. At transonic rate of 2 inches per hour with an average rain evaluation of many different types of materials and supersonic speeds, rain erosion of aircraft drop diameter of 2 mm. can be made. The best materials can be selected materials may prove to be a limiting factor in After firing about a dozen rounds, Convair for larger scale tests. Good correlation of test data all-weather flying conditions. engineers search the drop area and retrieve the with theoretical analysis being conducted at the In order to determine the best materials for miniature parachutes and specimens for evalua­ National Bureau of Standards is being obtained. missiles and aircraft, the Convair Division of tion. In rare instances a projectile overtakes the General Dynamics Corporation at San Diego, California, has developed a ballistic method of testing specimens. Tests are conducted under controlled rain conditions up to speeds of 1900 miles an hour, approximately Mach 2·5. Test specimens are mounted in the nose of a modified 20-mm. projectile and fired horizontally from a standard 20-mm. aircraft cannon through simulated rainfall. Upon firing, a tracer element in the projectile is ignited and burns for approxi­ mately ¾ second. A black powder separation charge then ignites and expels the test specimen and parachute. Opening loads on the 6-inch vented-canopy nylon parachute are 500 pounds. This load checks the forward velocity of the speci­ men within 10 feet. Parachute and specimen land about 1,500 feet from the firing point. Speed of the projectile can be varied from Mach 1·0 to Mach 2·5 by controlling the main powder charge. Convair is testing two types of projectile heads —ogee, or rounded heads, and dumdum heads, which are disks of metal, plastics, or ceramics. Rainfall is simulated by a 500-foot sprinkling system installed on Camp Elliott property near San Diego. The sprinkling system, operated by a portable pump, consists of a single horizontal pipe mounted three feet above the ground. Spray Fellowship of the Society Dr John Hadji-Argyris THE ROYAL AERONAUTICAL SOCIETY Dr George Steedman Hislop Dr Kenneth Glenny Bergin David James Mr N. E. Rowe has taken office as President of John Cecil Kelly-Rogers George Bruce Bolt the Society. Air Marshal Sir John Nelson Boothman Paget McCormack Dr Norman Adrian de Bruyne Sir Arthur de Terrotte Nevill Horace William Clarke Dr Joseph Henry Preston The following awards have been made: Eric John Earnshaw Thomas Simpson William Marlow Evans Sir Lawrence James Wackett Honorary Fellowship of the Society James Charles Floyd John Leslie Watkins Dr Igor I. Sikorsky, F.I.A.S., M.A.S.M.E. Sir Wilmot Hudson Fysh Frank Leslie Wattendorf Mr H. Grinsted, C.B.E., B.Sc., F.C.G.I., F.R.Ae.S. Esmond Allen Gibson Daniel Howell Williams. Aircraft Engineering

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Jun 1, 1955

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