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Psychiatric assessment in congenital blindness, ASD and ID: experience from two clinical cases

Psychiatric assessment in congenital blindness, ASD and ID: experience from two clinical cases PurposePsychiatric assessment in adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and intellectual disability (ID) is complex and challenging. With co-occurring congenital blindness, this complexity is increased. Systematic knowledge about psychiatric assessment in this combination of challenges is virtually non-existing, and there is little guidance available for clinicians faced with this task. The paper aims to discuss these issues.Design/methodology/approachExperiences from comprehensive psychiatric assessments in two adults with congenital blindness, ASD, and ID are explored and discussed.FindingsAdaptation of assessment procedures usually employed for individuals with ASD and ID involved no major alteration, but co-operation between mental health and visual impairment professionals was important, as was the involvement of the families of the individuals in question. In both cases, the patient met criteria for an anxiety disorder, underlining the vulnerability and the challenges involved in living with this combination of challenges.Research limitations/implicationsThere is an urgent need for research into mental health issues for this group, including case studies describing successful treatment or intervention for these issues.Practical implicationsPsychiatric assessment in individuals with this combination of challenges may be feasible, but requires involvement of professionals specializing in mental health in developmental disabilities, and professionals in visual impairment. Assessments need to be individually adapted.Originality/valueThis is the first study systematically describing psychiatric assessment in this group involving the use of checklists and assessment tools. Strategies and tools that were useful are described and discussed to aid other clinicians faced with similar challenges. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities Emerald Publishing

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
2044-1282
DOI
10.1108/AMHID-03-2019-0007
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

PurposePsychiatric assessment in adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and intellectual disability (ID) is complex and challenging. With co-occurring congenital blindness, this complexity is increased. Systematic knowledge about psychiatric assessment in this combination of challenges is virtually non-existing, and there is little guidance available for clinicians faced with this task. The paper aims to discuss these issues.Design/methodology/approachExperiences from comprehensive psychiatric assessments in two adults with congenital blindness, ASD, and ID are explored and discussed.FindingsAdaptation of assessment procedures usually employed for individuals with ASD and ID involved no major alteration, but co-operation between mental health and visual impairment professionals was important, as was the involvement of the families of the individuals in question. In both cases, the patient met criteria for an anxiety disorder, underlining the vulnerability and the challenges involved in living with this combination of challenges.Research limitations/implicationsThere is an urgent need for research into mental health issues for this group, including case studies describing successful treatment or intervention for these issues.Practical implicationsPsychiatric assessment in individuals with this combination of challenges may be feasible, but requires involvement of professionals specializing in mental health in developmental disabilities, and professionals in visual impairment. Assessments need to be individually adapted.Originality/valueThis is the first study systematically describing psychiatric assessment in this group involving the use of checklists and assessment tools. Strategies and tools that were useful are described and discussed to aid other clinicians faced with similar challenges.

Journal

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual DisabilitiesEmerald Publishing

Published: Aug 21, 2019

References