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Providing a learning disability in‐reach service for young adult offenders serving a sentence of Imprisonment for Public Protection

Providing a learning disability in‐reach service for young adult offenders serving a sentence of... Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to report on a three‐year contract to provide learning disability in‐reach to young offenders serving a sentence of Imprisonment for Public Protection (IPP) at HMYOI Aylesbury. Design/methodology/approach – A whole population sample ( n =75) was obtained between December 2009 and July 2011, where all had received an assessment of intellectual functioning using either the in‐reach screening protocol, consisting of the Kaufman Brief Intelligence Test – Version 2 (KBIT‐2) and four background questions, the Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence (WASI) or the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS). Findings – It was found that 5.5 per cent of the population had a standard score of less than 70 (significant impairment) and a further 18.6 per cent fell between 70 and 79 (borderline range). The mean standard score of the KBIT‐2 (85.8) was consistent with previous studies of prison populations. The background had a significant but weak association with the KBIT‐2 scores, but lacked sufficient specificity. Research limitations/implications – Further research is required if these findings are to be generalised to the wider prison population. Practical implications – Systematic screening for learning disability can be of clinical benefit in identifying the needs of young offenders, which is the first step to addressing these needs. Originality/value – A number of publications by the Department of Health, the Home Office and third sector organisations have identified the need for services for offenders with a learning disability. In‐reach provision to prisons is still in its infancy and, currently, no gold standard exists for screening tools. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Learning Disabilities and Offending Behaviour Emerald Publishing

Providing a learning disability in‐reach service for young adult offenders serving a sentence of Imprisonment for Public Protection

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References (31)

Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2012 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
2042-0927
DOI
10.1108/20420921211305882
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to report on a three‐year contract to provide learning disability in‐reach to young offenders serving a sentence of Imprisonment for Public Protection (IPP) at HMYOI Aylesbury. Design/methodology/approach – A whole population sample ( n =75) was obtained between December 2009 and July 2011, where all had received an assessment of intellectual functioning using either the in‐reach screening protocol, consisting of the Kaufman Brief Intelligence Test – Version 2 (KBIT‐2) and four background questions, the Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence (WASI) or the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS). Findings – It was found that 5.5 per cent of the population had a standard score of less than 70 (significant impairment) and a further 18.6 per cent fell between 70 and 79 (borderline range). The mean standard score of the KBIT‐2 (85.8) was consistent with previous studies of prison populations. The background had a significant but weak association with the KBIT‐2 scores, but lacked sufficient specificity. Research limitations/implications – Further research is required if these findings are to be generalised to the wider prison population. Practical implications – Systematic screening for learning disability can be of clinical benefit in identifying the needs of young offenders, which is the first step to addressing these needs. Originality/value – A number of publications by the Department of Health, the Home Office and third sector organisations have identified the need for services for offenders with a learning disability. In‐reach provision to prisons is still in its infancy and, currently, no gold standard exists for screening tools.

Journal

Journal of Learning Disabilities and Offending BehaviourEmerald Publishing

Published: Sep 7, 2012

Keywords: Learning disability; In‐reach; Prisons; Imprisonment for Public Protection; Screening; Young offenders; KBIT‐2; Criminals

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