Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Problems and Progress in Aircraft Design

Problems and Progress in Aircraft Design IF variety is the spice of life, then aircraft engineers have little to complain of in their experience of the last twenty years. It is true that most of the hopes of a sane world, with which we set out after the first wara world in which aircraft would be a powerful influence for good were wearing a bit thin in 1929. It was becoming clear that only the few could afford to fly. There was little prospect of a demand for aircraft as private or public transport vehicles on a scale which would provide a healthy basis for a free competitive industry. Possibly the most surprising phenomenon of those times of depression was the survival of so many aircraft concerns. In the succeeding yearsMr Churchill's locust years 193135darkened by the shadow of coming catastrophe, the meagre defence requirements provided a means of existence. Research, fostered by a few brave spirits, not only lived but made notable strides. Above all, the creative genius of engineers contrived to find means of producing the vital advances upon which, from 1936 onwards, rearmament in the air was founded. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

Problems and Progress in Aircraft Design

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology , Volume 21 (5): 2 – May 1, 1949

Loading next page...
 
/lp/emerald-publishing/problems-and-progress-in-aircraft-design-TJKVCskf2h

References

References for this paper are not available at this time. We will be adding them shortly, thank you for your patience.

Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb031757
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

IF variety is the spice of life, then aircraft engineers have little to complain of in their experience of the last twenty years. It is true that most of the hopes of a sane world, with which we set out after the first wara world in which aircraft would be a powerful influence for good were wearing a bit thin in 1929. It was becoming clear that only the few could afford to fly. There was little prospect of a demand for aircraft as private or public transport vehicles on a scale which would provide a healthy basis for a free competitive industry. Possibly the most surprising phenomenon of those times of depression was the survival of so many aircraft concerns. In the succeeding yearsMr Churchill's locust years 193135darkened by the shadow of coming catastrophe, the meagre defence requirements provided a means of existence. Research, fostered by a few brave spirits, not only lived but made notable strides. Above all, the creative genius of engineers contrived to find means of producing the vital advances upon which, from 1936 onwards, rearmament in the air was founded.

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: May 1, 1949

There are no references for this article.