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Printing from an Applications Program

Printing from an Applications Program Printing from an Applications Program Bill Miller Consultant, Microcomputer Center Federal Library Committee (FEDLINK) Library of Congress Washington, DC 20540 Does your printer work fine with OCLC gram doesn't mean that any other program but not with other software, or vice versa? knows anything about your system printer. To help you understand this situation, let's examine how various software packages DOS a la MODE send output to a printer. Software that uses the operating system Basically, there are two ways that an (prints from DOS) does not have to be applications program can send information configured, at least not not for the printer. to a printer: one is to send it directly to If the printer is not on the parallel port, the port the printer is connected to; the however, you must tell DOS where to other is to pass the output to DOS (the send the printer output. To do this, use Disk Operating System) and ask DOS to the MODE command, options 3 and 4 send it to the printer. Each method has ad­ (the LPT and COM modifications), as dis­ vantages and disadvantages. cussed on pp. 6-11 3 and 6-114 in the IBM Disk Operating System Manual (Ver. 2.0, 1st ed.). Note that you must Configured Programs both initialize the serial port to the cor­ Programs that send output directly to the rect parameters (including baud rate, par­ printer usually have to be configured or ity, stop bits, and data bits) and redirect "installed," so they will know the type the printer output to that port; this re­ and model of the printer and where it is. quires two variations of the MODE com­ Once these programs are configured, it is mand. n o longer necessary to set them up for the printer. The OCLC Terminal Software is an Examples of this type of software excellent example of this type of software. include dBASE II or III, the BASIC inter­ Another advantage of these programs preter, and most spreadsheets. Some wor d processing programs also fall into is that they simplify use of any advanced this category; others (such as WordStar features your printer may have. Printing and WordStar 2000) either have to be from DOS is usually limited to simple ASCII text—no text "attributes" such as configured or will ask you at print time overstriking (boldface) or underscoring, for wher e the printer is. Microsoft Word is example. Configured programs may offer one such program. MM you a menu from which to choose italics and other print capabilities. For example, the just-released Version 3.0 of the OCLC Terminal Software simplifies print feature selection via a menu function. However, if you change your system configuration, you must reconfigure the software. Also, you should be aware that each software package of this type must be This article is adapted from one that origi­ configured individually. Simply because nally appeared in FEDLINK Technical Notes, you have configured one applications pro­ vol. 3, no. 3-4. 12 OCLC Micro Vol. 1, No. 5 Nov. 1985 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png OCLC Micro Emerald Publishing

Printing from an Applications Program

OCLC Micro , Volume 1 (5): 1 – May 1, 1985

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
8756-5196
DOI
10.1108/eb055752
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Printing from an Applications Program Bill Miller Consultant, Microcomputer Center Federal Library Committee (FEDLINK) Library of Congress Washington, DC 20540 Does your printer work fine with OCLC gram doesn't mean that any other program but not with other software, or vice versa? knows anything about your system printer. To help you understand this situation, let's examine how various software packages DOS a la MODE send output to a printer. Software that uses the operating system Basically, there are two ways that an (prints from DOS) does not have to be applications program can send information configured, at least not not for the printer. to a printer: one is to send it directly to If the printer is not on the parallel port, the port the printer is connected to; the however, you must tell DOS where to other is to pass the output to DOS (the send the printer output. To do this, use Disk Operating System) and ask DOS to the MODE command, options 3 and 4 send it to the printer. Each method has ad­ (the LPT and COM modifications), as dis­ vantages and disadvantages. cussed on pp. 6-11 3 and 6-114 in the IBM Disk Operating System Manual (Ver. 2.0, 1st ed.). Note that you must Configured Programs both initialize the serial port to the cor­ Programs that send output directly to the rect parameters (including baud rate, par­ printer usually have to be configured or ity, stop bits, and data bits) and redirect "installed," so they will know the type the printer output to that port; this re­ and model of the printer and where it is. quires two variations of the MODE com­ Once these programs are configured, it is mand. n o longer necessary to set them up for the printer. The OCLC Terminal Software is an Examples of this type of software excellent example of this type of software. include dBASE II or III, the BASIC inter­ Another advantage of these programs preter, and most spreadsheets. Some wor d processing programs also fall into is that they simplify use of any advanced this category; others (such as WordStar features your printer may have. Printing and WordStar 2000) either have to be from DOS is usually limited to simple ASCII text—no text "attributes" such as configured or will ask you at print time overstriking (boldface) or underscoring, for wher e the printer is. Microsoft Word is example. Configured programs may offer one such program. MM you a menu from which to choose italics and other print capabilities. For example, the just-released Version 3.0 of the OCLC Terminal Software simplifies print feature selection via a menu function. However, if you change your system configuration, you must reconfigure the software. Also, you should be aware that each software package of this type must be This article is adapted from one that origi­ configured individually. Simply because nally appeared in FEDLINK Technical Notes, you have configured one applications pro­ vol. 3, no. 3-4. 12 OCLC Micro Vol. 1, No. 5 Nov. 1985

Journal

OCLC MicroEmerald Publishing

Published: May 1, 1985

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