Predicting immediate and longer‐term transfer of training

Predicting immediate and longer‐term transfer of training Describes an exploratory investigation conducted to examine factors affecting the initial and sustained transfer of interpersonal skills training to the workplace. Demonstrates the ongoing role of trainee motivation in the immediate and longer term transfer of learned skills to work. Suggests that initial transfer of skills is an important prerequisite of subsequent skill application in the workplace. Concludes that factors which promote initial transfer of training, such as the perceived relevance/usefulness of the course, appear to have an indirect effect on later use of trained skills. Also concludes that, in the long term, individuals with more autonomy in their jobs are more likely to apply learned skills, perhaps because they are more able to create opportunities for using trained skills at work. This may be especially true for those with high levels of motivation. Discusses the implications of these findings both for individuals learning new skills, and for organizations optimizing the utility of their training provision. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Personnel Review Emerald Publishing

Predicting immediate and longer‐term transfer of training

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Abstract

Describes an exploratory investigation conducted to examine factors affecting the initial and sustained transfer of interpersonal skills training to the workplace. Demonstrates the ongoing role of trainee motivation in the immediate and longer term transfer of learned skills to work. Suggests that initial transfer of skills is an important prerequisite of subsequent skill application in the workplace. Concludes that factors which promote initial transfer of training, such as the perceived relevance/usefulness of the course, appear to have an indirect effect on later use of trained skills. Also concludes that, in the long term, individuals with more autonomy in their jobs are more likely to apply learned skills, perhaps because they are more able to create opportunities for using trained skills at work. This may be especially true for those with high levels of motivation. Discusses the implications of these findings both for individuals learning new skills, and for organizations optimizing the utility of their training provision.

Journal

Personnel ReviewEmerald Publishing

Published: Jun 1, 1997

Keywords: Autonomy; Interpersonal skills training; Motivation; Skills flexibility; Training; Workplace learning

References

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