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POSTWAR TRADE PROSPECTS

POSTWAR TRADE PROSPECTS March, 1944 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERIN G 63 already developed and the situation has been most wisely tackled. The Department concerned has set up an organization for collecting Aircraft Engineering stocks and storing them in a central Government warehouse. Th e Monthly Scientific and Technical Further manufacture of these products has been prohibited, without specific permission, and all demands for supplies must be sent Orga n of the Aeronautical Engineering not to manufacturers but to " DISPOSALS LTD.", the Professio n specially constituted Government concern formed to control the Editor: Lieut.-Col. W. Lockwood Marsh, O.B.E., F.R.Ae.S.,M.S.A.E.,F.I.Ae.S. stocks and meet requirements, so far as is possible, from them. This seems to us a most wise and statesmanlike step which augurs Vol. XVI. No . 181 March, 1944 well for the times when similar situations develop in other trades. I t is, of course, reminiscent of the formation in 1919 of the company called—if memory serves aright—AIRCRAFT DISPOSALS LTD. which took over all aircraft material from the MINISTRY OF MUNITIONS ANY of us remember the remarkable development during and gradually released it in the ensuing years; with, we recall, the Four Years War of what was then practically a new considerable success in tempering the wind. British industry engaged upon the design and manufacture of scientific instruments, particularly of the optical variety. With­ A Sound Principle out belittling in any way the pioneer work of many famous scientists in certain fields—some whose names remain enshrined in the The formation of a series of Government disposal companies, titles of honoured units in the industry—it is tru e to say that in 1914 as is presumably proposed, to deal with this problem in all industries we were largely dependent on Germany for instruments of precision seems to us an admirable project and well calculated to "cushion" and tha t the "capacity"—to use the present-day jargon—available in the change-over from war production to peacetime sales by providing this country was very small and quite inadequate to cope with the a chain of "buffers." They should largely eliminate the post-war demands from the three Services, to say nothing of industry. By profiteer and black-market operator and provide a control that, 1918, however, a large and flourishing industry turning out products however unwelcome, will obviously be necessary. The provision of the highest class had been built up which retained its reputation of a flow of much-needed supplies to the countries released from through the period between the two wars. Though, like other enemy occupation without hampering the legitimate activities of industries—and none more so than the aircraft world—cut down manufacturers will not be easy and this seems the only possible in proportions, the instrument firms continued to evolve tools of basis on which to start meeting the rival claims. We are not, quality and were among the enlightened communities which formed in the normal way, believers in Government control, nor lovers a research association for their mutual benefit and the public of bureaucracy, but in this sphere we believe so much measure of regu­ advantage. lation will be necessary. An Essential Industry Limitations of Trade There is no branch of engineering which is more dependent on So far as concerns export trade, the possible effect of two arti­ instruments than the aircraft industry and we are glad, therefore, to ficial restrictions on overseas markets—nor even the fact of their be privileged to publish the tribute to the trade organization present existence—is not nearly so widely realized as it should be. dealing with them, and plea for its support and recognition, which Both, and the two are complementary to each other, are the con­ appears in this issue. TH E SCIENTIFIC INSTRUMENT MANUFACTURERS' comitants of Lend-Lease. On the face of it legitimately, taking ASSOCIATION OF GREAT BRITAIN is constituted in four sections, a narrow superficial view, the export from Great Britain is at present on the activities of each of which the aircraft industry is equally prohibited of any class of article which is being imported to this dependent. Among the instruments covered by. Section 1 are country from the United States under Lend-Lease arrangements. such items as microscopes, optical elements, cameras and projection Less understandably, it is equally against the regulations to export apparatus; Section 2 is for specifically, among others, aeronautical, any article to a locality which is deemed to be predominantly the survey and meterological instruments; Section 3 deals with sphere of operations, or in the occupation, of the armed forces of the industrial precision instruments; and Section 4 interests itself in United States. Remarking, en passant, that the latter is a most laboratory and medical research apparatus. In one sphere or striking adoption of the old tag, on which the scarcely-to-be-men­ another, aeronautics calls upon the services of each of these sections tioned British Empire was built, tha t "trade follows the flag", it may and neither Industry nor Service could exist without their aid. be pointed out that the combined effect of these two regulations is, in The instrument industry is concerned about two dangers: the practice, to cut out all possibility of present-day British export flooding of the market with goods surplus to requirements at the end trade except with countries comprising what we are now required to call by the cumbersome title, the British Commonwealth of of the war and the need to obtain an adequate share in the world's markets for export. As its members must, of course, be aware, Nations. They, on the other hand, grant in effect for the duration neither of these problems is peculiar to themselves. Both of them of the war a world monopoly of the export of certain goods to any are matters of grave import to almost every industry in this country. part of the world and of all goods to certain places on the globe. A present danger of the first of these prohibitions is that an astute American business man will have every incentive to refuse to cancel Surplus Disposal forward contracts for, and continue to send to, England Lend-Lease The question of the disposal of the surplus stocks of all classes of articles of which we may no longer be in short supply, in order goods is a matter that obviously needs a great deal of thought and to maintain his advantageous position in regard to exporting—and very careful handling if all manufacture is not to cease, possibly indeed we believe that this attitude has already been adopted. for a number of years, while the surplus is liquidated. It is quite clearly an affair of high policy for the Government and is one which presumably is exercising the mind of the MINISTER OF RECONSTRUC­ Need for Vigilance TION and the PRESIDENT OF THE BOARD OF TRADE, who is, we Whatever be the immediate justification for these regulations, it understand, charged with the disposal of all factories and business is quite clear that they are not calculated—to put it euphemistically premises, as they become redundant to war needs. —to further British post-war export trade and there is every reason to fear that they may lead to some of our most important pre-war An Existing Precedent overseas markets being to all intents and purposes lost to us. In case they do not already know it, we can offer some comfort I n view of the vital need for this country to be in a position to pay to the members of the S.I.M.A. in the fact that there is already for its necessary imports by the sale of exports, this development is evidence that this matter is being dealt with. In one industry, of extremely serious and one which all trade associations need to which we have knowledge, a surplus of a certain type of product has watch. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

POSTWAR TRADE PROSPECTS

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology , Volume 16 (3): 1 – Mar 1, 1944

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb031100
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Abstract

March, 1944 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERIN G 63 already developed and the situation has been most wisely tackled. The Department concerned has set up an organization for collecting Aircraft Engineering stocks and storing them in a central Government warehouse. Th e Monthly Scientific and Technical Further manufacture of these products has been prohibited, without specific permission, and all demands for supplies must be sent Orga n of the Aeronautical Engineering not to manufacturers but to " DISPOSALS LTD.", the Professio n specially constituted Government concern formed to control the Editor: Lieut.-Col. W. Lockwood Marsh, O.B.E., F.R.Ae.S.,M.S.A.E.,F.I.Ae.S. stocks and meet requirements, so far as is possible, from them. This seems to us a most wise and statesmanlike step which augurs Vol. XVI. No . 181 March, 1944 well for the times when similar situations develop in other trades. I t is, of course, reminiscent of the formation in 1919 of the company called—if memory serves aright—AIRCRAFT DISPOSALS LTD. which took over all aircraft material from the MINISTRY OF MUNITIONS ANY of us remember the remarkable development during and gradually released it in the ensuing years; with, we recall, the Four Years War of what was then practically a new considerable success in tempering the wind. British industry engaged upon the design and manufacture of scientific instruments, particularly of the optical variety. With­ A Sound Principle out belittling in any way the pioneer work of many famous scientists in certain fields—some whose names remain enshrined in the The formation of a series of Government disposal companies, titles of honoured units in the industry—it is tru e to say that in 1914 as is presumably proposed, to deal with this problem in all industries we were largely dependent on Germany for instruments of precision seems to us an admirable project and well calculated to "cushion" and tha t the "capacity"—to use the present-day jargon—available in the change-over from war production to peacetime sales by providing this country was very small and quite inadequate to cope with the a chain of "buffers." They should largely eliminate the post-war demands from the three Services, to say nothing of industry. By profiteer and black-market operator and provide a control that, 1918, however, a large and flourishing industry turning out products however unwelcome, will obviously be necessary. The provision of the highest class had been built up which retained its reputation of a flow of much-needed supplies to the countries released from through the period between the two wars. Though, like other enemy occupation without hampering the legitimate activities of industries—and none more so than the aircraft world—cut down manufacturers will not be easy and this seems the only possible in proportions, the instrument firms continued to evolve tools of basis on which to start meeting the rival claims. We are not, quality and were among the enlightened communities which formed in the normal way, believers in Government control, nor lovers a research association for their mutual benefit and the public of bureaucracy, but in this sphere we believe so much measure of regu­ advantage. lation will be necessary. An Essential Industry Limitations of Trade There is no branch of engineering which is more dependent on So far as concerns export trade, the possible effect of two arti­ instruments than the aircraft industry and we are glad, therefore, to ficial restrictions on overseas markets—nor even the fact of their be privileged to publish the tribute to the trade organization present existence—is not nearly so widely realized as it should be. dealing with them, and plea for its support and recognition, which Both, and the two are complementary to each other, are the con­ appears in this issue. TH E SCIENTIFIC INSTRUMENT MANUFACTURERS' comitants of Lend-Lease. On the face of it legitimately, taking ASSOCIATION OF GREAT BRITAIN is constituted in four sections, a narrow superficial view, the export from Great Britain is at present on the activities of each of which the aircraft industry is equally prohibited of any class of article which is being imported to this dependent. Among the instruments covered by. Section 1 are country from the United States under Lend-Lease arrangements. such items as microscopes, optical elements, cameras and projection Less understandably, it is equally against the regulations to export apparatus; Section 2 is for specifically, among others, aeronautical, any article to a locality which is deemed to be predominantly the survey and meterological instruments; Section 3 deals with sphere of operations, or in the occupation, of the armed forces of the industrial precision instruments; and Section 4 interests itself in United States. Remarking, en passant, that the latter is a most laboratory and medical research apparatus. In one sphere or striking adoption of the old tag, on which the scarcely-to-be-men­ another, aeronautics calls upon the services of each of these sections tioned British Empire was built, tha t "trade follows the flag", it may and neither Industry nor Service could exist without their aid. be pointed out that the combined effect of these two regulations is, in The instrument industry is concerned about two dangers: the practice, to cut out all possibility of present-day British export flooding of the market with goods surplus to requirements at the end trade except with countries comprising what we are now required to call by the cumbersome title, the British Commonwealth of of the war and the need to obtain an adequate share in the world's markets for export. As its members must, of course, be aware, Nations. They, on the other hand, grant in effect for the duration neither of these problems is peculiar to themselves. Both of them of the war a world monopoly of the export of certain goods to any are matters of grave import to almost every industry in this country. part of the world and of all goods to certain places on the globe. A present danger of the first of these prohibitions is that an astute American business man will have every incentive to refuse to cancel Surplus Disposal forward contracts for, and continue to send to, England Lend-Lease The question of the disposal of the surplus stocks of all classes of articles of which we may no longer be in short supply, in order goods is a matter that obviously needs a great deal of thought and to maintain his advantageous position in regard to exporting—and very careful handling if all manufacture is not to cease, possibly indeed we believe that this attitude has already been adopted. for a number of years, while the surplus is liquidated. It is quite clearly an affair of high policy for the Government and is one which presumably is exercising the mind of the MINISTER OF RECONSTRUC­ Need for Vigilance TION and the PRESIDENT OF THE BOARD OF TRADE, who is, we Whatever be the immediate justification for these regulations, it understand, charged with the disposal of all factories and business is quite clear that they are not calculated—to put it euphemistically premises, as they become redundant to war needs. —to further British post-war export trade and there is every reason to fear that they may lead to some of our most important pre-war An Existing Precedent overseas markets being to all intents and purposes lost to us. In case they do not already know it, we can offer some comfort I n view of the vital need for this country to be in a position to pay to the members of the S.I.M.A. in the fact that there is already for its necessary imports by the sale of exports, this development is evidence that this matter is being dealt with. In one industry, of extremely serious and one which all trade associations need to which we have knowledge, a surplus of a certain type of product has watch.

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Mar 1, 1944

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