Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

Political governance and (account)ability of private universities in developing countries

Political governance and (account)ability of private universities in developing countries PurposeDue to scarcity of research in governance and accountability in private higher education in developing countries, the central aim of the study is to explore the tensions surrounding good governance in legitimizing accountability in private universities in developing countries with reference to Bangladesh. Design/methodology/approachMixed methods are employed: a) a quantitative survey of 1,576 students from all 79 private universities; b) qualitative interviews with 23 stakeholders; and c) policy documents including the Private University Acts, the World Bank Report and newspapers (1992 to 2015) were evaluated. The objectives of these mixed methods in this study are juxtaposed and generate complementary insights that together create a bigger picture surrounding governance and accountability issues.FindingsUsing Clark (1983)’s triangle model (i.e. state control, academic oligarchy and market forces together with the external influence of donors and boards of trustees as internal governance) and new institutional theory (NIT) (DiMaggio and Powell, 1983), the major contributions of this study are explaining the root causes of the poor governance of private universities through three related factors: a) the substantial political power and autonomy held by boards of trustees, b) a lack of enforcement of Private University Act and c) a lack of coordination among stakeholders. The coercive power of the state becomes powerless since the board of trustees ultimately enjoys political power and “does whatever it can.” The lack of coordination of the academic oligarchy (e.g. professors and academics) and market forces (represented by students) by the board of trustees creates a paradox of governance and hence a decoupling of formal policies and actual practice.Practical implicationsThe findings have major policy implications for local and international policymakers for improving good governance in private universities in developing countries.Originality/valueThe novelty of the study’s findings represents an initial effort to understand the complex and persistent phenomenon of prolonged poor governance of private universities in developing countries, which is largely neglected in the literature. This will undoubtedly contribute to literature and policy implications. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Public Sector Management Emerald Publishing

Political governance and (account)ability of private universities in developing countries

Loading next page...
 
/lp/emerald-publishing/political-governance-and-account-ability-of-private-universities-in-N003YywsLt
Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0951-3558
DOI
10.1108/IJPSM-09-2014-0112
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

PurposeDue to scarcity of research in governance and accountability in private higher education in developing countries, the central aim of the study is to explore the tensions surrounding good governance in legitimizing accountability in private universities in developing countries with reference to Bangladesh. Design/methodology/approachMixed methods are employed: a) a quantitative survey of 1,576 students from all 79 private universities; b) qualitative interviews with 23 stakeholders; and c) policy documents including the Private University Acts, the World Bank Report and newspapers (1992 to 2015) were evaluated. The objectives of these mixed methods in this study are juxtaposed and generate complementary insights that together create a bigger picture surrounding governance and accountability issues.FindingsUsing Clark (1983)’s triangle model (i.e. state control, academic oligarchy and market forces together with the external influence of donors and boards of trustees as internal governance) and new institutional theory (NIT) (DiMaggio and Powell, 1983), the major contributions of this study are explaining the root causes of the poor governance of private universities through three related factors: a) the substantial political power and autonomy held by boards of trustees, b) a lack of enforcement of Private University Act and c) a lack of coordination among stakeholders. The coercive power of the state becomes powerless since the board of trustees ultimately enjoys political power and “does whatever it can.” The lack of coordination of the academic oligarchy (e.g. professors and academics) and market forces (represented by students) by the board of trustees creates a paradox of governance and hence a decoupling of formal policies and actual practice.Practical implicationsThe findings have major policy implications for local and international policymakers for improving good governance in private universities in developing countries.Originality/valueThe novelty of the study’s findings represents an initial effort to understand the complex and persistent phenomenon of prolonged poor governance of private universities in developing countries, which is largely neglected in the literature. This will undoubtedly contribute to literature and policy implications.

Journal

International Journal of Public Sector ManagementEmerald Publishing

Published: Aug 8, 2016

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$499/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month