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Playing truant within organisations Informal relationships, work ethics and absenteeism

Playing truant within organisations Informal relationships, work ethics and absenteeism This study focuses on the relationship between informal relationships, work ethics and (short‐time) absenteeism. According to self‐categorisation theory, which elaborates on the social identity theory, hypotheses were formulated for the relationship between consensus in work ethics within teams, informal relationships (cohesiveness) and short‐term absenteeism. The hypotheses were tested within two Dutch organisations: study 1 concerns a housing corporation ( n =53, eight teams), and study 2 concerns a nursing home ( n =97, nine teams). As expected, consensus in work ethics and cohesiveness within a team were positively related. Results from multi‐level analyses showed as expected, a negative relationship between cohesiveness within a team and short‐term absenteeism of employees. Furthermore, an interaction‐effect was found in the first study, but not in the second: the more cohesive the team, the stronger the relationships between work ethics and short‐term absenteeism. Findings are discussed in terms of recommendations for further research and practical implications. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Managerial Psychology Emerald Publishing

Playing truant within organisations Informal relationships, work ethics and absenteeism

Journal of Managerial Psychology , Volume 19 (2): 20 – Mar 1, 2004

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0268-3946
DOI
10.1108/02683940410526109
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This study focuses on the relationship between informal relationships, work ethics and (short‐time) absenteeism. According to self‐categorisation theory, which elaborates on the social identity theory, hypotheses were formulated for the relationship between consensus in work ethics within teams, informal relationships (cohesiveness) and short‐term absenteeism. The hypotheses were tested within two Dutch organisations: study 1 concerns a housing corporation ( n =53, eight teams), and study 2 concerns a nursing home ( n =97, nine teams). As expected, consensus in work ethics and cohesiveness within a team were positively related. Results from multi‐level analyses showed as expected, a negative relationship between cohesiveness within a team and short‐term absenteeism of employees. Furthermore, an interaction‐effect was found in the first study, but not in the second: the more cohesive the team, the stronger the relationships between work ethics and short‐term absenteeism. Findings are discussed in terms of recommendations for further research and practical implications.

Journal

Journal of Managerial PsychologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Mar 1, 2004

Keywords: Work ethic; Absenteeism; Team working; The Netherlands

References

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