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Person-centred care in Northern Ireland: learning from the experiences of adult social care users

Person-centred care in Northern Ireland: learning from the experiences of adult social care users The move towards a “person-centred” or “personalised” system of adult social care has been at the heart of policy debates in Great Britain. However, policy developments in Northern Ireland are more limited than in other parts of the UK, and less attention has been paid to reforming adult social care. The purpose of this paper is to examine the views and experiences of adult social care users who receive care at home, to explore if and how a person-centred approach might work for older adults in Northern Ireland.Design/methodology/approachUsing a qualitative approach, semi-structured interviews were carried out with 12 people aged over 70 years who receive social care provision at home.FindingsThe empirical findings show that social care users experienced limited involvement in their care planning process, reflecting a predominantly service-led approach. The importance of care worker continuity and consistency was crucial for all participants, particularly for maintaining discreet routines and promoting personal dignity. However many experienced different care workers which presented challenges caused by the inconsistency of carers.Research limitations/implicationsThe majority of participants in the study were women, despite attempts to achieve greater gender diversity. It was also difficult to recruit a range of ethnic groups for the study. It would be important for future studies to include these groups and to ensure their voices are represented in further work in this area. Nonetheless, the findings offer valuable insight into the views of adult social care users and can form a useful basis for future studies.Originality/valueThe findings provide a more nuanced understanding of what people want and expect in social care to generate future policy debates and discussions in planning long-term adult social care provision in Northern Ireland. It also provides important and timely contribution to this area, where there is currently limited research and information available. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Integrated Care Emerald Publishing

Person-centred care in Northern Ireland: learning from the experiences of adult social care users

Journal of Integrated Care , Volume 29 (3): 12 – Jul 19, 2021

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
© Emerald Publishing Limited
ISSN
1476-9018
DOI
10.1108/jica-06-2020-0036
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The move towards a “person-centred” or “personalised” system of adult social care has been at the heart of policy debates in Great Britain. However, policy developments in Northern Ireland are more limited than in other parts of the UK, and less attention has been paid to reforming adult social care. The purpose of this paper is to examine the views and experiences of adult social care users who receive care at home, to explore if and how a person-centred approach might work for older adults in Northern Ireland.Design/methodology/approachUsing a qualitative approach, semi-structured interviews were carried out with 12 people aged over 70 years who receive social care provision at home.FindingsThe empirical findings show that social care users experienced limited involvement in their care planning process, reflecting a predominantly service-led approach. The importance of care worker continuity and consistency was crucial for all participants, particularly for maintaining discreet routines and promoting personal dignity. However many experienced different care workers which presented challenges caused by the inconsistency of carers.Research limitations/implicationsThe majority of participants in the study were women, despite attempts to achieve greater gender diversity. It was also difficult to recruit a range of ethnic groups for the study. It would be important for future studies to include these groups and to ensure their voices are represented in further work in this area. Nonetheless, the findings offer valuable insight into the views of adult social care users and can form a useful basis for future studies.Originality/valueThe findings provide a more nuanced understanding of what people want and expect in social care to generate future policy debates and discussions in planning long-term adult social care provision in Northern Ireland. It also provides important and timely contribution to this area, where there is currently limited research and information available.

Journal

Journal of Integrated CareEmerald Publishing

Published: Jul 19, 2021

Keywords: Adult social care; Northern Ireland; Older people; Personalisation; Person-centred care; Devolution

References